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Alameda Museum Sale Draws Crowd

Dozens of Alamedans and other Bay Area residents visited Alameda Museum this past Saturday (off Park Street on Alameda Avenue) for a special sale of items once owned by a three generations of a Los Angeles-based family that traces its roots to Southern California pioneers. 

There were also items from the museum’s own reserve of goodies.

Museum curator George Gunn eagerly shared his thoughts on various quilts, chairs, tables and other furnishings. One “crazy quilt” dated from the 1800s and included feather stitching. 

“People know we do a lot of research. And we tag items with historical information,” Gunn says. “If it costs several hundred dollars, people want to know that a piece is authentic.”

 There were several Victorian chairs for sale, some dating from 1870. And a Leopold Stickley Cherry Valley table, two leaves and four chairs were offered for just $800.

“We price to sell,” said Gunn, who notes that 40 percent of the proceeds from estate sales go to the museum.

For those looking to remodel or rework a home, there were several antique doors on sale. And a rickshaw was priced at just $65.

A couple from Berkeley admired an old adding machine, but declined to buy it as a key was missing. 

The modern-day register kept humming along, though, as visitors found items from the past to take home with them and enjoy in the future.

Janet Levaux