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Alameda Library to Showcase Victorians, Music

By Janet Levaux
Monday, November 15th, 2010 at 10:35 pm in Uncategorized.

victorian

A lecture on Alameda architecture of the Victorian Era (1837-1901) takes place at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 17, at the Main Library.

Though Alameda mirrored many American cities by imitating styles popular during Queen Victoria’s reign, the Island has retained its Victorian-era charm, say local architecture and history buffs Eric J. Kos and Dennis Evanosky.

The two speakers plan to explore Victorian-era domestic architecture and how the various styles prevalent during her reign took root and flourished in Alameda.

This is the first of a series of four programs that will cover the background of Alameda’s rich architectural diversity and its influences on Alameda. Other themes to be discussed in upcoming meetings are Greek Revival on December 15, Gothic Revival on January 19 and Italianate on February 16.


Also coming up at the library is the final LIVE @ the Library 2010 Concert Series.

This Saturday, November 20, the Alameda Library Foundation, Friends of the Alameda Library and the City Library Board Art Committee present Rick Dougherty of the Kingston Trio, who will share a cabaret evening of songs from jazz to folk served with sides of humor and wit.

The event sponsors are Perforce Foundation, Wells Fargo, Clear-Com, Bank of Alameda, and Burma Superstar. In-kind donors include Cairdea Design & Marketing, R&B Cellars, Books Inc., and Dewey’s Friends Café.

All concerts are at the Alameda Main Library in the Regina K. Stafford Rooms.

Doors open at 7:00 p.m., while the concert starts at 8:00 pm. Light refreshments and R&B Cellars wine available.

Tickets are $25 and all proceeds go to benefit the library foundation and supporting organizations. They can be bought at Books Inc. at 1344 Park Street, Dewey’s Friend’s Café in the Alameda Main Library and online.


Thanks to Beth Bourland for the illustration of the Alameda home; Beth’s art is on display at High Street Station coffeehouse as part of the Frank Bette Center’s second satelitte gallery.

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