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Alameda Election Results 2010: Gilmore, Bonta & Johnson

With votes at 48 precincts counted, Marie Gilmore had more than 6,700 votes, putting her in the Alameda mayor’s slot in 2011.

Alameda rivals and fellow City Councilmembers Frank Matarrese had 4,400, with Doug DeHaan in third place at 4,300.

In the City Council race, newcomer Rob Bonta picked up about 6,600 votes, while the current Mayor Beverly Johnson received some 5,700.

Councilmember Lena Tam, who’d been under investigatation earlier this year by the city, had about 5,500 votes. Thus, Tam looks poised to complete the last two years of Gilmore’s unexpired term on the council.

On the school board, newcomer Margie Sherratt had nearly 10,300 votes, while incumbent Mike McMahon had about 6,550.

So there’s a bit of the old and new in store for Island politics next year.

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Alameda Elections 2010: Preliminary Results Coming In

The Alameda County Registrar’s count of mail-in ballots and about half of the Island’s precincts shows Marie Gilmore well ahead of Frank Matarrase, Doug DeHaan and other candidates in the mayoral race.

The City Council, however, is a much tighter race with Rob Bonta in the lead. Lena Tam and Beverly Johnson are (somewhat ironically) neck in neck for the second slot, and Jean Sweeney not too far behind.

The school board slots are tilting toward incumbent Mike Mcmahon and Margie Sherratt.

It’s still early, of course, and the county registrar’s website is being overloaded at times — so we’ll have to be patient.

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Alamedans Get Political Survey Calls From ???

Oakland-based EMC Research called this Alameda resident last night, August 29, to see if I would answer a brief survey on issues and candidates. But since the kids had to go back to school early today, August 30, I declined.

The survey group called back this evening, at about 7 p.m. and asked again if I would take a “short survey.”

I was asked for my reactions to mayoral candidate statements, opinions on  the mayoral and council candidates, the fire chief, interim city manager, Alameda Point, SunCal, unions, etc.

With the long list of candidates, hot issues and questions in the survey, I really had to narrow down my preferences, define my opinions and figure out what was influencing my choices. This was certainly educational — though I wouldn’t call the process “brief.”   

(The only controversy that wasn’t included in the survey was the new restricted schedule for our bridge openings.) 

About 15 or 20 minutes later, I was told that my survey information was confidential. But the survey-taker could not (or would not) tell me who was paying for the “research.”

Does anyone in or around the Island know who is responsible for the query?  

Or, better said, would the candidate responsible for this “research” come forward when the results are ready — and share both the data and the financial resources behind it?

This hometown voter wants to know … as I’m sure others do.

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Bike Share Alameda?

One of the things that causes me confusion these days is how we Americans/Alamedans can absorb almost daily doses of really bad environmental news and do so little to alter our behaviors. Even here in liberal/relatively-environmentally-aware Alameda we seem to be resistant—sometimes even hostile—to modifying our transportation-related behavior. But, thinking outside of our regular boxes, there certainly are options. By way of example, Sunday’s New York Times had a piece about European bike-sharing programs:

In increasingly green-conscious Europe, there are said to be only two kinds of mayors: those who have a bicycle-sharing program and those who want one…In Barcelona, streets during rush hour are lined with commuters and errand-goers on the bright red bicycles of Bicing, the city’s program, which began 18 months ago. Bicing offers 6,000 bicycles from 375 stands, which are scattered every few blocks; the bikes seem to be in constant motion.

Though bike-sharing programs are taking off in Europe, in the United States Continue Reading