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SALVIA: A legal drug growing in popularity with teens

By asoglin
Monday, May 18th, 2009 at 9:52 am in Health & Safety, Parenting Issues, Teens.

Contra Costa Times has this story about salvia, something your kids may be using:

Parents worry about salvia, a legal hallucinogen big on YouTube

Bill Cooper hardly expected to dial into a world of Mazatec Indian shamanism when his phone went dead and he reached to borrow his son’s.

Then he saw one of the text messages: “hey, when were you fixen to blaze the salvia.”

Salvia divinorum, which local smoke shops sell in packets of dark, crushed-leaf extract — with a “strictly for incense use only” disclaimer — has spurred new laws in more than a dozen states in recent years amid a slew of online videos showing youths speaking or acting bizarrely after smoking it; and the well-publicized suicide of a Delaware teen in 2006, with the coroner listing salvia as a contributing cause.

In many of the videos, the smokers often start laughing uncontrollably, then are rendered incoherent by a forceful high that users describe as much shorter than LSD, but often more intense. …

According to a federal drug use survey … , an estimated 1.8 million people age 12 or older used Salvia divinorum at some point, including 750,000 that used it in the past year … . Contrast that with ecstasy, which was used by 2.1 million people in the same one-year period.

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9 Responses to “SALVIA: A legal drug growing in popularity with teens”

  1. al Says:

    I am a 30 year pot smoker, i own my home i was able to retire at the age of 43. I have tried this stuff. It is incence it tastes like it too. More importantly it does nothing, this is another “refer madness all over the place

    (NOTE: Edited for language.)

  2. Concerned Citizen Says:

    Dangers of salvia have been way overblown. Surely not too many parents would be happy with their children experimenting with psychedelics but there are some of us adults who use it responsibly.

    Salvia has helped me deal with many problems in my life — not Paxil, not Xanax but salvia.

    So please don’t be so quick to judge things you don’t know much about. Salvia is a blessing, not a curse.

    I suggest anyone who might disagree with me to go read Genesis 1:12.

  3. Ryan Says:

    This stuff is no joke. I wouldnt wish a trip on this stuff to my worst enemy. Out of body experience, no control of anything, it was trulty one of the scariest things ever experoenced.

  4. The Real Concerned Citizen Says:

    Anything that may partially inhibit some individuals ability to control their will is bad for society, period. Even if it doesn’t affect some individuals, this is not a reason for making it illegal.

    In response to the potsmoker Al… who is going to pay your social security benefits if we all retired at 43? The answer is you’re a sponge, and we responsible citizens should be able to declare your kind as dependents on our tax forms. Or, you should be deported to China or another socialist mecca for the same reason.

  5. Join Says:

    To “The Real Concerned Citizen”,

    You enjoy being mean? Tone it down a bit and provide thought-out viewpoints expressed in a professional manner, OK?

    “who is going to pay your social security benefits if we all retired at 43? The answer is you’re a sponge”

    I think you should reconsider your viewpoint. Someone who retires at 43 has all the money they need. They won’t “sponge” off of anyone.

    “…and we responsible citizens…”

    I think someone who has earned enough money at 40-something to retire can be considered “responsbile citizen”

    “Anything that may partially inhibit some individuals ability to control their will is bad for society, period.”

    Really? There are hundreds, if not thousands of different drugs which are prescribed by physicians that “partially inhibit” people.

    Ever had your wisdom teeth pulled? The drugs prescribed by the dentist effect your ability to drive, concentrate and even speak. Is that “bad for society, period” ???

  6. Bruno Marchal Says:

    I have intensely studied Salvia Divinorum. I read four books, hundreds of papers and I tested it on myself and many people. I have not find the slightest reason to make it illegal. It is a powerful medication for migraine, diarrhea, physical or moral or spiritual depression, sleep trouble, drug addiction, and nasal congestion. I think it is one of the safest product on this planet. Like oral tobacco and cannabis it seems it could help to prevent brain degeneration like Alzheimer. The reason to make it illegal are based on the usual error in logic and statistic, and on ignorance about trance states. It is estimated that 2 millions of Americans have smoked Salvia, and there are just no complaints. The youtube video are impressive but they illustrate well the fact that, even when used in the most debilitating conditions, the worst which can happen is some bruises and nightmare recall. This happens all the time with sober mind states. To ban Salvia is just an illustration that some politicians do not care at all about health, but only on their demagogical way to gain power by selling fear. Banning Salvia would introduce problems where there are none. It would be a shame. It is not even comparable to alcohol or smoked tobacco. It is safe, and if you don’t like it, like many, you will just not used it. I love it, because I see only great benefits.

  7. Responsible Parent Says:

    While Salvia could be described as “psychoptic”, its effects really bear about as much similarity to LSD as alcohol does to cannabis – ie, the two are not really comparible (not that I’m knocking the classic psychedelics, mind you – they have immense benefits when used correctly). Making it illegal – as seems to be inevitable in a world where a few people want to control the will of many others (take note “The Real Concerned Citizen”) may go some way to making it less available to some people, but like the criminalization of virtually every other psychoactive substance, will really do nothing to wipe out its use – this stuff grows like a weed, does well in shade / indoors, and looks very similar to a wide variety of common plants. I imagine that other green-thumbed people like myself are doing their utmost to plant it in as many outdoor public and wild locations as possible, so as to ensure supply when we are no longer able to grow it in the back (and front) yard. For a smoother experience, I’d suggest making a distilled acetone extract, evaporating off the acetone completely and making an alcohol solution (effectivly a tincture) and holding 1-2ml in the mouth for 20 minutes, whilst lying down listening to Beethoven’s Pastoral (6th) Symphony: A-M-A-Z-I-N-G !!! If you don’t like it, don’t do it, and try to convince your kids that temporary ego-loss and transcendence of the self (a lack of which is basically the main reason we are in the early stages of a long-term global climatic and ecological disaster) is a bad thing – but don’t try to turn me into a criminal for choosing to use (and not abuse) it!

  8. morgan Says:

    Although smoking salvia can be described as a hallucinogenic and sometimes fearful mind trip, I do not see a reason why it should not be legalized. Pharmacologists believe salvia could open new frontiers for the treatment of addiction, depression and pain. The unfavorable side effects vanish in under a few minutes. Also, salvia can have vastly different effects depending on dose, potency and the mindset and tolerance of its users. I think that salvia is legalized because it can be controlled and the “trip” experienced by smoking this herb only lasts ten minutes at most.

  9. Bruno Marchal Says:

    Responsible Parent says: ‘… Beethoven’s Pastoral (6th) Symphony: A-M-A-Z-I-N-G !!! If you don’t like it, don’t do it, and try to convince your kids that temporary ego-loss and transcendence of the self (a lack of which is basically the main reason we are in the early stages of a long-term global climatic and ecological disaster) is a bad thing – but don’t try to turn me into a criminal for choosing to use (and not abuse) it!’

    I so agree with you. And the real problem is not prohibition. The deeper problem is the mentality which makes prohibition looks respectable. Lincoln and Jefferson made it clear that prohibition of substance can only impoverish every one, though. Including as you say the whole planet indeed). Drugs are a construct of prohibition. Prohibition *is* the dangerous thing.

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