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Kazmir says he’s available to pitch if needed after ejection

Scott Kazmir is ready to pitch again if needed.

Scott Kazmir is ready to pitch again if needed.

Scott Kazmir had been looking forward to pitching Saturday as much as he’d looked forward to any start this season.

He was in the Cleveland starting rotation in 2013 and this was going to be his one chance to pitch against the Tribe in Cleveland this season as a member of the A’s rotation.

Then he got ejected in the second inning by umpire Jerry Layne.

“It’s very frustrating,’’ Kazmir said of being tossed after getting only four outs. “I was looking forward to this start. I actually felt really good.

“Actually this was the best I’ve felt going out there. I was hitting all my spots. It just didn’t work out.’’

Kazmir kicked the dugout garbage can on his way to the clubhouse, and the usually soft-spoken Kazmir was regretting that after the game.

“I want to go apologize to the trash can,’’ he said. “It did nothing wrong.’’

The question now is just how this screws up the A’s pitching plans. Dan Otero threw 3.2 innings, Fernando Abad one, Luke Gregerson two and Sean Doolittle one as the A’s closed out the 6-2 win.

Normally covering 6.1 innings of relief work will tax a bullpen, but Fernando Rodriguez, Joe Savery and Jim Johnson didn’t pitch at all, and while Abad and Doolittle could come back after pitching just one inning, Otero said that because he only threw 32 pitches “I don’t know, I might be able to throw (Sunday).’’

Manager Bob Melvin would probably hesitate at having Otero do that, but there is another source of innings, should one be needed. Kazmir said that he’d be available.

“Could I pitch? Sure,’’ he said. “I’d be willing to.’’

The A’s have the series finale in Cleveland Sunday with Jesse Chavez starting, then have a day off Monday, so the pitching situation isn’t particularly dire, even after Kazmir’s early ejection.

John Hickey

Returning to the Oakland A's beat after a dozen years covering the Seattle Mariners. Covered the A's through the late 1980s and 1990s.