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Vogt’s hilarious referee routine helps ease some tensions in the A’s clubhouse … including his own

In the Oakland A’s victorious clubhouse Thursday night, a replay of Stephen Vogt’s appearance on the MLB Network’s Intentional Talk was being shown on the big screen TV, and players were reveling in its madcap majesty all over again. Nobody was laughing at it any harder than Jon Lester, who had just thrown a complete-game three-hit shutout at the Minnesota Twins. Lester threw one of the gems of the year for the A’s, and he talked about the significance of it in the game story here.

But even Lester would probably prefer to hear the details of Vogt’s incredibly funny bit imitating an NBA referee’s antics (this has got to be Joey Crawford) while making various game calls, which he broke out on national TV with the help of Jonny Gomes. Gomes saw the routine in the clubhouse a few days ago, and was so bowled over in hysterics that when he got the call to be interviewed by Chris Rose and Kevin Millar, he decided Vogt’s act needed a bigger audience. After a few questions from the show’s hosts about his readjustment to being back in Oakland, Gomes brought Vogt on camera dressed in makeshift referee garb. The rest is history. Watch and enjoy here. Vogt comes in at 2:45.

Bob Melvin had seen the bit live, and before he was even asked a question in his pre-game press conference, the manager had to hype it.

“Did anybody see Intentional Talk today?” he said. “Oh my god, Vogt and Gomes, it was unbelievable. Best I’ve ever seen. Vogter wore his basketball referee outfit and put on quite the show. Between the two of them, it was very entertaining.”

MLB.com wisely put the video up ASAP, and it’s sure to increase the stature of Vogt’s vast comedic talents. Seriously, if this guy wasn’t a baseball player, he could probably get a cast spot on Saturday Night Live. One of his favorite routines, in fact, is his Chris Farley “down by the river” reprise that it is a total gut-buster. We haven’t seen it here in Oakland, but when Vogt was with Tampa, he nailed an impression of Rays manager Joe Maddon that is still legendary down in those parts.

So how did this latest national breakout take place?

“Jonny texted me at 12:30 today and said, `Do you want to go on with me as the ref, and I said YES,” Vogt said. “He was nice enough to include me in his interview today. I enjoy that kind of stuff. In this job, we are 30-year-old men, but we get to act like 5 year olds. It’s pretty fun.”

Before the second game of the series against Tampa Bay, Vogt was in the clubhouse and noticed things were kind of quiet, possibly even a little tense. After all, the A’s are still adjusting to life without Yoenis Cespedes, and it’s shown at the plate. Vogt has been perhaps the most notable victim of the tension, heading into Thursday night in an 0-for-23 slump. Anyway …

“I just brought my whistle out and started calling fouls,” Vogt recalled. “You’ve got to save it for times when guys are maybe a little nervous or there are times when it’s kind of quiet and dead in here, and you try to liven things up a little bit and have some fun. That’s something I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to do.”

It not only worked on the A’s, it worked on Vogt himself. He slammed a two-run homer in his first at-bat, and as he said, he felt like his old self for a change at the plate.

“I don’t think I necessarily corrected anything, so to speak,” he said. “Over the last week or so, I’ve gotten away from who I am as a hitter. I’m trying too hard to do what I did tonight, get a big hit, forgetting that I’m not a home run hitter. I’m a guy who waits for a good pitch and hit it hard. If it goes out of the yard, it goes out of the yard. I was trying create more than I needed to create. But I felt great tonight. I just need to be sure I’m seeing the ball and being selective, swinging at good pitches. I feel like I did that tonight. I felt like I was back to my normal self.”

Vogt not only snapped out of his 0 for 23, Brandon Moss and John Jaso also broke out from 0 for 18s, Moss with a double and Jaso a single. For Vogt’s part, he said it’s all part of how baseball plays with the psyche.

“This game is funny,” he said. “Myself, I was locked in for 90 days. You go four days without a hit and all of a sudden there’s panic. Why? Why? But that’s just the nature of this game. It’s a game where you fail 70 percent of the time, but we expect to be perfect with results. I just need to relax and not be as hard on myself. It’s a mental battle, and particularly at this point in the season, we know what the ramifications are if we don’t win. There’s a lot of pressure we put on ourselves we don’t normally need to.”

Now if Vogt can only sell his referee routine to his wife Alyssa, who will start her first season as head girls basketball coach at Tumwater High this winter up in Washington state.

“She doesn’t think it’s funny,” he said. “Obviously, she’s a coach, and she keeps telling me, `I honestly don’t know why people think it’s funny.’ I think she just likes to give me a hard time by saying that.”

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Punto placed on DL, Freiman recalled

As expected, the A’s placed infielder Nick Punto on the 15-day disabled list Sunday. He suffered a strained right hamstring Saturday while rounding third base in the fifth inning of an 8-3 victory over the Kansas City Royals.

The A’s recalled first baseman Nate Freiman from Triple-A Sacramento to take Punto’s place on the active roster. He was batting .284 for the River Cats, with 15 home runs and 74 RBI.

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A’s finally cut the cord on Jim Johnson, designate $10 mil reliever for assignment, plus good news on Cespedes

The A’s finally put struggling high-priced reliever Jim Johnson out of his Oakland misery Thursday, designating the right-hander for assignment after his latest in a series of mound meltdowns.

Johnson, 31, entrusted with a 9-2 Oakland lead against Houston Wednesday night, gave up four straight hits – in just 11 pitches – and was quickly removed by A’s manager Bob Melvin. All four runs eventually scored as the A’s hung on for a 9-7 victory at the Coliseum.

It was just the latest in a long list of setbacks, starting with a loss in his first A’s appearance on March 31 and a blown save in his second.

Johnson, 4-2 with a 6.92 ERA and just two saves before losing his job as the closer, was a major disappointment for the A’s this year. Signed to a $10 million one-year deal after the departure of Grant Balfour in free agency, the A’’s looked secure with a pitcher who had saved 101 games in his previous two seasons with the Baltimore Orioles.

A’s manager Bob Melvin said it was difficult giving Johnson the bad news.

“It was very tough,” Melvin said. “There’s a human side to all this, too. The performance wasn’t great, but it’s not like he wasn’t accountable. I just couldn’t get him in a spot where he could get on a roll, and I feel awful about it, too, because it’s my job to get him in a position to succeed, and it just didn’t happen here.”
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After an even 100 games, A’s still have enough questions to make fans nervous

Yoenis Cespedes had a big breakout with two home runs, but a thumb injury put a damper on his great night.

No one should be complaining about the A’s after a 62-38 record after 100 games, right? This is more than anybody had any right to expect at season’s outset, when the A’s were two starters down and they were still playing Daric Barton at first base with a straight face. While the division title still figures to be a fight with the Angels, Oakland is better positioned to win it schedule-wise and it would require a monumental collapse to miss the playoffs altogether.

But worry? Yes, it’s OK to worry, and there are plenty of things to worry about.

It’s OK to worry about the unpredictability of Yoenis Cespedes, who hit his first home runs in 25 games (102 at-bats), but promptly got injured in the same game. The A’s absolutely need Cespedes to be a driving force in any deep playoff run, and things were looking great until he left the game Wednesday night with a thumb injury of uncertain seriousness. Cespedes is just now getting his stroke where he wants it, and another health setback could derail him from being the difference-maker he needs to be when it matters most, down the stretch and in the postseason.

It’s OK to worry about the A’s starting staff being to maintain its brilliance to this point (Jim Johnson excepted). Can Sonny Gray and Jesse Chavez handle a heavy innings load down the stretch, or will Oakland have to scale them back. And really, Scott Kazmir probably should be added to that list since he hasn’t pitched more than 200 innings since 2007.
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A’s can make hay vs. losing clubs, but Astros not the pushovers they once were, plus Melvin on chat with Milone

Carl Steward here. Tuesday night’s game ran way late, so my final game story didn’t make the actual print newspaper. Here’s the final version, plus the expanded notes from the early version.

OAKLAND – As good as the A’s have been, gaining ground on the Los Angeles Angels has proved to be quite problematic for them for nearly two weeks now.

Oakland hasn’t picked up a full game on the Angels since July 8, when they upped their American League West lead to 4 ½ games after a win over the Giants. Since then, L.A. has been hovering at 1 ½ games behind before a loss on the A’s off day Monday made it a two-game deficit.

The A’s had a great opportunity to make it three Tuesday night after the Angels suffered a 4-2 home loss to Baltimore, but Houston’s L.J. Hoes spoiled the chance to widen the gap. Hoes’ 12th inning first-pitch solo homer off Fernando Abad gave the Astros a rare 3-2 win at the Coliseum before 22,908.

It was a missed chance for Oakland, but the A’s will have more opportunities coming on the horizon. The opening game against the Astros marked a stretch where Oakland plays 20 straight games against teams with sub-.500 records while the Angels must contend with the Orioles, the Detroit Tigers, the Los Angeles Dodgers and the rejuvenated Tampa Bay Rays and Boston Red Sox over the same stretch.

That said, the Astros clearly aren’t a team that’s just going to roll over anymore for the A’s, who were 25-7 against Houston all-time before this defeat.
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A’s, Melvin enjoy impressing big crowds, even dogs

Josh Donaldson gave A's fans (human and canine) a reason to go home happy Friday night. (Staff photo/Jose Carlos Fajardo)

Josh Donaldson gave A’s fans (human and canine) a reason to go home happy Friday night. (Staff photo/Jose Carlos Fajardo)

Not much in the way of pregame news today from A’s manager Bob Melvin. Josh Reddick, who homered for the Stockton Ports last night, will play twice more with them and they’ll discuss the next move after Sunday’s game. Coco Crisp, bothered by a neck injury, will D.H. tonight. The neck figures to bother him for a little while. There’s still no timetable for Kyle Blanks, who has been able to do some running on the field.

Melvin did speak again about how much he enjoys his team putting on a show when the A’s do have a big crowd on hand. Last night, 27,232 were in the house and were rewarded with Josh Donaldson’s walk-off home run. With it being Bark at the Park night and dogs on hand, Melvin hopes to have snagged a few future customers.

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Vogt has a dream couple of days at the park of his youthful dream, while Donaldson realizes own dream

Josh Donaldson whacked his 20th homer Thursday and also was named to the A.L. Home Run Derby squad.

Growing up in Visalia, Stephen Vogt was a big Giants fan. So were his parents. They even had season tickets at AT&T Park, so to hit a home run on Wednesday night and then drive in three runs with a pair of two-out singles Thursday in the A’s 6-1 victory left him feeling a bit high.

Vogt has been on a high for awhile, pretty much since his recall. He’s hitting .367, for crying out loud. During his current 10-game hitting streak, he’s hitting .457, and .412 with two outs and runners in scoring position. Bob Melvin has to have him in the lineup right now somewhere — right field, catcher, and now first base. He played some third base in college, so maybe second? Could he turn the DP?

But to do what he’s done at AT&T the past two days has been the highlight of his return to the majors.
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Loss aside, Hammel looks like a keeper

Just a few quick notes with a short turnaround to Thursday’s afternoon game at AT&T, the last between the A’s and Giants in 2014 unless they meet in October (and you know what that would mean).

As I wrote in the game story, Jason Hammel had a tough act to follow before he even took the mound Wednesday night. First start for the A’s, and he was making it on the road against a Giants team that knows him reasonably well. But most of all, he was following up a six-game string in which Oakland starters gave up one run or less and pitched at least six innings.

That streak was destined to end, and alas, the A’s now can’t finish the season at 129-33.

But if Hammel’s start didn’t measure up to the unreal standards of the past week, he showed reasonably well. Five innings, three runs (only two earned) and he kept the A’s in the game even though, as he said, he didn’t have command of his signature slider and walked more guys (three) than he’d walked in any start since April 16. Look, it’s not an open competition for the fifth spot — yet. Let’s see what Hammel does over his next three or four starts and possibly more. Tommy Milone threw four innings in Sacramento Wednesday night and gave up one run in four innings. Drew Pomeranz could be coming off the disabled list within the week, and with a rehab start or two, he could be ready to go. But it’s Hammel’s job until he loses it, and he didn’t do anything to suggest he can’t be a very solid fourth or fifth guy after one performance. His velocity was consistently in the 93-mph range and he did battle through a very tough 37-pitch third inning and allowed just one run. He did make a bad home run pitch to Hunter Pence, but that was really his only bad mistake.

What’s remarkable is that as rosy as things have looked for the A’s, their margin for error in the A.L. West still isn’t all that great. The Angels, who have the second-best record in baseball, keep applying the pressure, winning again Wednesday and cutting the Oakland division lead back to 3 1/2 games. With 71 games to go, there should be no breathing easy. While they would seem a virtual lock for the postseason, the A’s can’t let off the pedal or they could find themselves in that unenviable one-game wild-card playoff come October.

In other words, they could use the series wrapup before they head to Seattle for a very challenging weekend series that will end the first half. Scott Kazmir against Tim Hudson, facing his old team. Should be fun.