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Zito makes it official, announces his retirement

Barry Zito announced his retirement from baseball Monday.

Barry Zito announced his retirement from baseball Monday.

Left-handed pitcher Barry Zito, who spent a decade and a half in the starting rotation of both the Oakland A’s and San Francisco Giants, announced his retirement Monday.

Writing for the website www.theplayerstribune.com, Zito said “I am retiring today from baseball, but I’ll never be too far away from the game that made me who I am.’’

Zito spent the entire 2015 season pitching in Triple-A Nashville, and thought his career would end with a one-inning relief appearance for the Sounds Sept. 6.

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Vogt comes back to life with a pair of awards and a return to the field

Stephen Vogt missed 12 games with one of the worst foul tip shots to the groin you are ever likely to see on a baseball field. I hadn’t actually seen the video until Tuesday night, and it was hard to watch. You’d like to say you feel Vogt’s pain, but … uh, no thanks.

“I don’t wish that on my worst enemy,” Vogt said. “It was the worst 10 days of my life, and I don’t ever want to go through it again.”

But he’s finally getting back to normal. After a couple of games at designated hitter, Vogt was at first base against the Rangers and he could be getting back behind the plate sometime this weekend, perhaps for Barry Zito’s momentous Saturday start against old pal Tim Hudson.

W”e’re pretty much healed, we’re glad to be back in there,” he said. I want to play every day. I’m glad that it wasn’t anything more than it was. I’m glad it was a two-week thing and not a life thing. I’m very blessed and lucky that it wasn’t anything worse.”

Vogt also has been prepping for getting behind the plate both mentally and physically. He caught what he said was an hour’s worth of bullpen sessions Tuesday, because the biggest challenge is overcoming the psychological aspects of the hit he took. You get a little gun-shy after what he went through, and he wants to break through those mental barrier.
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Early returns on Danny Valencia continue to be positive

Danny Valencia is impressing the A's already. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Danny Valencia is impressing the A’s already. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

OAKLAND — The A’s are building for next year and beyond, so self-scouting is a big part of that.

Danny Valencia is a player Oakland wants to learn more about and the early returns continue to be positive after he knocked in two first-inning runs in the A’s 2-1 win Saturday over the Houston Astros.

“He’s been great,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said of Valencia. “Knocking in runs and that’s what you want guys in the middle of the order to do. We want to give him some opportunities here against righties and we gave him a big one today and he came through for us.”

Valencia’s solo home on Friday night proved to be the winning run and his two-run double in the first inning Saturday had the same effect as the A’s (50-62) won their second straight against the first-place Astros. Continue Reading

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A’s send O’Flaherty to Mets for player to be named later

The A’s packed left-handed reliever Eric O’Flaherty and cash and sent him to the Mets Tuesday in a deal announced in the third inning of the A’s-Orioles game at the Coliseum.

The Mets had been looking for someone to serve as a specialist to get left-handed hitters out, and the A’s, who were not going to resign him at the end of the season, had been looking to get rid of what was left of O’Flaherty’s two-year, $7 million contract.

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Ryan Cook trade was quietly made, but he was just one of the big reasons A’s have failed this year

In for John Hickey …

People forget just how good Ryan Cook was in 2012. Really good, and really nasty. He was 6-2 with a 2.09 ERA and 14 saves, only allowed 42 hits in 73 1/3 innings and struck out 80 with a 0.914 WHIP. He made the All-Star Game, where he pitched a 1-2-3 inning and struck out Bryce Harper and David Wright looking. He was a mainstay in the A’s power bullpen along with Sean Doolittle and Grant Balfour and one of the big reasons the A’s wound up winning the American League West.

“He was paramount to the success we’ve had here the last three years,” said manager Bob Melvin. “We don’t accomplish what we did, certainly in ’12.”

But Friday, just before the trade deadline, Cook was dealt to the Boston Red Sox for a player to be named later, who is not likely going to be anyone you’ve ever heard of. It was done swiftly, quietly, and without much emotional reflection.

But really now, what the heck happened to Cookie?

He still had the stuff, as he showed in spring training. He just didn’t know where it was going. He pitched in just four games for the A’s this season, and gave up runs in three of them. He was dispatched to Triple-A Nashville, where he was on-again, off-again, and never returned to Oakland. He was 4-1 with eight saves but had a 4.05 ERA and his hits-to-innings pitched ratio was almost dead even. His strikeouts were down, and his WHIP was a less than imposing 1.380.

It’s easy to dismiss Cook as a non-factor in 2015, but he should have been. He’s only 28, should be in the prime of his career, and had he even been close to his form in 2012 and 2013, he really would have helped this ’15 club. With Doolittle out, he conceivably could have stepped in as the closer as hard as he threw. It never came close to materializing, which makes you wonder why the A’s could never get him straightened out.

“Sometimes when you sent down, you can get a little bogged down with your confidence and your motivation,” Melvin said. “Sometimes a change of scenery in a new organization can really invigorate you. I think that will be the case with him. I know he’s excited about the opportunity.”

But what happened?

“Baseball’s about making adjustments and being consistent, and this year, he was not as consistent as we’d seen in the past,” Melvin said. “Maybe a little at the end of last year, too, the command issues ended up biting him a little bit. I think more than anything, it was the command issues, because the stuff was pretty close to the same.”


Coco Crisp played nine innings at Class A Stockton Thursday night, was scheduled to play another nine Friday night and may play another game over the weekend, then he’ll return to Oakland on Sunday and possibly play on Monday.

Melvin said the A’s don’t yet have a plan for left-hander Felix Doubront, acquired from the Toronto Blue Jays for cash considerations just before the trade deadline, but he’s inclined to think Doubront will get some starting opportunities, if for no other reason that the A’s have no left-handed starters at the moment. A 25-man move will be made once Doubront arrives in Oakland.

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Changes galore for A’s: Brooks to start, Mujica to be closer; Lawrie may see extended time at second base

Edward Mujica will get a chance to close for A's now that Tyler Clippard has been traded.

Edward Mujica will get a chance to close for A’s now that Tyler Clippard has been traded.

In the last five days the A’s have lost their No. 2 starter, who also happens to have the league’s best ERA, their full-time utility player and their closer.

Think there might be a few jobs up for grabs with Oakland?

There are.

The first man to get a crack at taking over in the rotation for Scott Kazmir will be Aaron Brooks, the right-handed pitcher picked up Tuesday as part of the Ben Zobrist trade with the Royals.

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A’s talking about business side of baseball after wave of trades

Brett Lawrie was one of many A's to talk about the business side of the game Tuesday after three trades in five days.

Brett Lawrie was one of many A’s to talk about the business side of the game Tuesday after three trades in five days.

There’s nothing like an unpopular trade to get players to talk about how “baseball is a business.’’

When that phrase is uttered, it’s a good bet the player is going for the easiest justification.

And when there have been three trades in five days as has been the case with the A’s, with three proven and popular big leaguers shipped off to make pennant race runs elsewhere, that baseball-as-business is the handiest crutch around.

The way to have prevented the trades of Scott Kazmir, Tyler Clippard and now Ben Zobrist would have been to win more. And not all that much more, either, If the A’s, a Major League-worst 10-24 in one-run games, had won say six more of those, games they had a legit chance to win,  they be a .500 team and they’d have been close enough that general manager Billy Beane might have gone in another direction.

That would mean turning one-in-three of their one-run losses into wins. I you’ve been watching the A’s, you know it wouldn’t have taken that much. A few big hits and a few clutch pitches would have gotten the job done.

That didn’t happen.

“At the end of the day, baseball is a business,’’ third baseman Brett Lawrie said. “This is what happens. You hate to lose the guys we lost, guys we’d built relationships with, but this is what’s happened, and there’s nothing we can do about it now.’’

DH Billy Butler signed a three-year contract with the A’s last winter, and the team he is playing with now doesn’t look anything like the one he thought he’d be playing with. Yet he has taken it in stride.

“I’ve been through this a few times in Kansas City,’’ he said. “If you’re not in contention, then players who are in the last years of their contracts are going to be traded. There’s a lot of frustration because we didn’t play better.

“We lost a lot of those one-run games that we should have won.’’

Catcher Stephen Vogt said he’d spotted Zobrist Tuesday morning in the hotel with his family, well before the trade went down.

“I was thinking I should say goodbye, just in case,’’ Vogt said. “I’m sorry I didn’t.

“The frustrating thing is we put ourselves in this position. But we still have 60-some games to play, and I think I speak for everyone in this clubhouse that we will be trying to win each one.’’

Right fielder Josh Reddick echoed that.

“We still have a lot of games to play, and we’re going to go out every day like we have,’’ Reddick said. “We haven’t had our best year, and that’s one of the reasons we’re here now.’’

If it was up to Reddick, he would have held off on making the trades, although he says he realizes the July 31 trade deadline waits for no one.

“I would have liked to us see have more time,’’ he said.

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Burns is sore, but feeling better; Doolittle throws off flat ground, bullpen scheduled for Thursday

Billy Burns is feeling better Saturday morning after fouling a ball off himself Friday night.  (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

Billy Burns is feeling better Saturday morning after fouling a ball off himself Friday night. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

SAN FRANCISCO — A’s outfielder Billy Burns said he feels better Saturday than he did the night before but he’s out of the starting lineup for the second game of this series with the Giants.

“I told the trainer I think I can play today, but he thinks it’s best if I rest,” Burns said. “I can still feel a little soreness but it’s a lot less pain than last night, so I think I’m good to go.”

Burns’ cringe-worthy injury was termed a testicular contusion and the rookie said it won’t cause to him to change his mind and begin wearing a cup.

A’s manager Bob Melvin won’t force him or any of his players to do so either. Continue Reading

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As strange as season has been, Billy Burns offers great hope for long-range future

I Believe In Billy Burns. And so does Stephen Vogt.

“He’s been a consistent, solid baseball player all season,” Vogt said Saturday night. “He’s the Rookie of the Year, in my opinion.”

Burns should be the Rookie of the Year in a lot of people’s opinions by now. If he’s not, they’re not paying close enough attention, and that’s entirely possible considering Oakland’s standing in the American League. But the campaign needs to start now, because there is not a better candidate out there, and he may need some public relations to drive home the obvious.

Burns scored the game-winning run in the A’s 3-2 10-inning victory on Vogt’s first-pitch single, and if Rickey Henderson was watching at home, you know he was saying, “Yeah, kid.”

Vogt got the Gatorade shower and the shaving cream pie, but Burns was the true hero of the winning rally. He not only opened the bottom of the 10th with a double in the right-center gap, he boldly bolted for third with nobody out and stole the base. Maybe not the proper play with the meat of the A’s order coming up, but no question, once he made it, the odds increased significantly that Oakland would get him home.

“I tried to time it up to get a good jump and I feel like I did get a good jump, so I just carried through with it,” Burns said. “Sometimes I’ll shut it down but I felt with the timing I had I thought I had a good shot at it, so I just took a chance.”
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Ken Korach back as the A’s radio voice, but for how long?

Ken Korach, the radio voice of the A’s for 20 seasons, was scheduled to move back behind the microphone on 95.7 The Game, the A’s flagship station for the first time Friday night for Oakland-Minnesota second-half opener.

Korach has been hobbled by pain in his left knee, which he has been rehabbing since suffering an off-season injury. He isn’t pain free, but with the A’s schedule keeping the team in the Bay Area for most of the next three weeks, he, his doctors and the A’s decided to see how it goes.

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