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Reddick hasn’t lost his touch for delivering a pie in the face

Coco Crisp circles bases after walkoff homer. Minutes later, he'd be hit by a whipping cream pie in the face and take a Gatorade bath.

Coco Crisp circles bases after walkoff homer. Minutes later, he’d be hit by a whipping cream pie in the face and take a Gatorade bath.

Right fielder Josh Reddick was in the Oakland clubhouse in the 12th inning Thursday when Coco Crisp delivered the walkoff homer that made the A’s 3-2 winners over the Mariners.

Not being on the field didn’t stop Reddick from doing what he knew he had to do.

“I was too late for the (home run) tunnel,’’ Reddick said, “but there was enough time for everything else.’’

The “everything else’’ Reddick referred to was the tradition of loading up a paper plate with whipping cream and catching Crisp flush in the face with it during the post-game television interview on the field.

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A dozen innings in 36 hours for bullpen, but situation not dire

Drew Pomeranz threw the 12th inning for the win Thursday and could be ready to pitch again Friday.

Drew Pomeranz threw the 12th inning for the win Thursday and could be ready to pitch again Friday.

In the space of 36 hours, the A’s have played 30 innings of baseball.

The good news is that the club has won two of three games, including Thursday’s 3-2 win over Oakland on the strength of Coco Crisp’s first-ever walkoff homer, a solo shot to start the bottom of the 11th inning.

The bad news is that they’ve had to use a ton of relief pitching. The A’s got six almost-perfect innings of relief Thursday, four A’s relievers combining to allow one hit and one walk.

That’s as many innings as the bullpen had to work in Wednesday’s day/night doubleheader against the Indians. The question now is how the bullpen sets up for Game 2 of the A’s-Mariners series Friday.

The answer is that even after those 12 innings of bullpen work, the relievers aren’t in bad shape. It seems unlikely that the A’s will feel pressured into bringing up some relief help for Friday, which will see Dan Straily get his first start of the season.

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`Let It Go’ from `Frozen’ is soundtrack of A’s first week

There is always music going in the A’s clubhouse before a game, but this first week of the season it’s been a little odd.

Or one thing, the usual hip-hop and rock has been replaced by old school rhythms dating back to the 70s, including Fleetwood Mac, which was at its peak when most of the members of the roster were busy being born.

But mixed into all of the old-ish tunes is the extremely current `Let It Go,’’ the song by Idina Menzel from the animated film “Frozen,’’ which given it’s pedigree as a song from a movie marketed to kids doesn’t seem like a song one would typically hear in the A’s clubhouse.

Guess again.

It’s in the music rotation every day, and with “Frozen’s’’ target audience is a bit younger than the A’s 20-someting average, so we asked about it.

“It is awesome,’’ first baseman Brandon Moss said. He’s seen the movie three times. “It’s very empowering. But I’d have to say it’s very un-us.’’

“It’s a good life lesson,’’ second baseman Eric Sogard said of the tune’s lyrics, which talks of putting the past behind, of ridding oneself of one’s fears and moving forward while the storm rages on.

Infielder Nick Punto doesn’t have a problem with the song, per se. But he is starting to burn out on it, nonetheless.

“We have two daughters,’’ he said. “That means I hear it maybe five times a day. And that’s before I get here and hear it again.’’

First baseman Daric Barton, who says he hasn’t seen the movie, said simply of the song’s popularity in the clubhouse, “I don’t get it.’’

The suggestion that the song was atypical for a Major League clubhouse struck reliever Sean Doolittle funny.

“Does this,’’ he said looking around the aging digs the A’s call home 81 games a year, “remind you of a normal clubhouse?’’

If you want to check out what the A’s have been listening to, you can click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moSFlvxnbgk

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Doubleheader wrap: Johnson should get it figured out, but it needs to happen in a hurry

After a very long 13-hour day at the ballpark, a very short blog post.

You can give Jim Johnson credit for one thing after his disastrous opening series with the A’s. The new closer isn’t afraid to face the music for a bad effort, whether it be a torrent of boos or a probing media horde wanting to know how a guy who saved 50 games last year suddenly looks like he’s lucky when he gets an out.

Johnson, who didn’t have a great spring, is off to an even worse start in the regular season. As he admitted himself after Wednesday night’s three-run blow-up when he was entrusted with a 4-3 lead in the ninth, the A’s should be 3-0 and they’re 1-2 primarily because of him. I wouldn’t go quite that far, but the fact is Oakland has been exceedingly fortunate with closers over the last several years, so to see Johnson blow games in his first two appearances is a bit shocking.

And the fans, what few of them showed for this latest disaster, don’t like it one bit. They started booing after Johnson gave up a leadoff hit to start the inning, and it only got louder as the inning progressed. It’s tough enough to blow a couple of games, but Johnson’s predecessor, Grant Balfour, was an extremely popular guy and his rage act won over the fans.
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Donaldson crushed it, but sometimes Coliseum is too tough

Josh Donaldson was surprised his ball in eighth inning Monday didn't clear center field wall at Coliseum

Josh Donaldson was surprised his ball in eighth inning Monday didn’t clear center field wall at Coliseum

Josh Donaldson came within inches of a three-run homer in Monday’s opener. The fact that he wound up with a single says everything you need to know about the Coliseum when it is cold and wet.

“I couldn’t believe that ball didn’t go out,’’ Donaldson said Tuesday, hours before the A’s were rained out of a Coliseum game for the first time since 1998. “I don’t know what else I can do.’’

Donaldson felt the same in the end of July and early August when he was hammering the ball with his 32-ounce bat “and it was just winding up on the warning track.’’

To combat that problem, Donaldson switched to a bat weighing another 1½ ounces. He wound up hitting .309 the rest of the year with eight homers and 32 RBIs in his last 52 games.

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Rules on blocking the plate very much still a work in progress

A's catcher John Jaso got his first taste of the new home plate collision rules in the sixth inning Monday vs. Cleveland

A’s catcher John Jaso got his first taste of the new home plate collision rules in the sixth inning Monday vs. Cleveland

Baseball is trying to reinvent the game, or at least smooth out some of the rough spots, and in Monday night’s opener between the A’s and the Indians, it’s clear that there is still a ways to go.

To combat the spate of concussions and severe injuries that have come from collisions at home plate, the rulebook has been rescripted to make sure the base runner has access to the plate.

However, changing the rule and making the rule second nature are not the same thing. In the sixth inning Monday A’s starter Sonny Gray picked up a deflected grounder and threw the ball to catcher John Jaso.

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Kazmir has the inside scoop on pitching to the Indians

On Tuesday night, Scott Kazmir will be trying to grind Cleveland bats into dust in his first-ever start for the A’s.

On Sunday night, the Oakland left-handed pitcher was sitting down at dinner with a group of those same Indians hitters, including Nick Swisher and Jason Kipnes, two of Cleveland’s most productive batsmen.

Kazmir clearly enjoyed his year in Cleveland, where he resuscitated a career that had hit the skids during a tour of duty in Anaheim. His fastball came back. His control came back. His confidence came back.

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Griffin trying not to think about not pitching these days

Even among all the rain and the chance that there would be no game at the Coliseum Monday, the A’s were mostly upbeat.

A.J. Griffin is trying to join in. But with the certain knowledge that he’s unlikely to pitch in the big leagues before May, it’s not easy.

Griffin missed the last two weeks of spring training with elbow and forearm troubles, and while the original schedule called for him to be start throwing as early as this weekend, he doesn’t know when he’s going to throw.

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Straily, Milone make best of rain with extended side work

Tommy Milone had to get his work in on the side after Saturday rainout.

Tommy Milone had to get his work in on the side

 

The rain that washed out Saturday’s Giants-A’s game at the Coliseum made for a long day for most of the A’s.

For pitchers Tommy Milone and Dan Straily, it was longer still. They were supposed to share the pitching duties against the Giants, Straily getting five innings and Milone four.

When the rain made sure that wouldn’t happen, it was off to plan B – each taking turns in the bullpen – the rain had stopped just about the time the game was called off – to get to their desired pitch count.

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Vogt takes demotion to Sacramento hard, but with grace

It was a great spring for Stephen Vogt. Right up until Saturday, when he got the word he was being sent down to Triple-A Sacramento.

Catcher Stephen Vogt got the bad news Saturday he is off to Sacramento.

Catcher Stephen Vogt got the bad news Saturday he is off to Sacramento.

It wasn’t unexpected, even if it was undeserved. Manager Bob Melvin said it was perhaps the most difficult end-of-spring conversation he’d ever had with a player.

It wasn’t just that Vogt hit .364 with three homers and a dozen RBIs. It was that he’s developed a bond with the A’s pitching staff, he is genuinely liked by A’s teammates and he was a major part of the Oakland success the second half of 2013.

But the decision to go with two left-handed hitting first basemen, Brandon Moss and Daric Barton, meant the squeeze for roster space was on. Vogt, part of a three-man catching rotation last year, was odd man out when the A’s went with two catchers, John Jaso and Derek Norris, leaving Vogt to start in Sacramento.

And he took it hard. He badly wanted to be in Oakland, to the point where “you never want to believe it will happen until it happens,’’ he said.

Melvin took it hard, too.

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