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Ken Korach back as the A’s radio voice, but for how long?

Ken Korach, the radio voice of the A’s for 20 seasons, was scheduled to move back behind the microphone on 95.7 The Game, the A’s flagship station for the first time Friday night for Oakland-Minnesota second-half opener.

Korach has been hobbled by pain in his left knee, which he has been rehabbing since suffering an off-season injury. He isn’t pain free, but with the A’s schedule keeping the team in the Bay Area for most of the next three weeks, he, his doctors and the A’s decided to see how it goes.

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Radio voice Korach on DL, will miss first homestand, road trip

Ken Korach will miss the first homestand and first road trip of the year while he rehabs his knee. His goal is to be back April 24.

Ken Korach will miss the first homestand and first road trip of the year while he rehabs his knee. His goal is to be back April 24.

The number of A’s on the disabled list has gone up by one; radio play-by-play man Ken Korach will miss this week’s Bay Bridge Series, the first homestand against Texas and Seattle and the first road trip as well.

Korach, who had a left knee replacement in 2012, has been rehabbing the knee since suffering an injury. The rehab is progressing, but Korach, entering his 20th year doing A’s radio work, isn’t ready at this point for a grueling 162-game season on 95.7 The Game, the A’s flagship station.

“I’ve wanted to find a way,” Korach told this newspaper Monday. “But it became clear there wasn’t, not with the amount of time I still need to get healthy.”

Korach and A’s vice president of communications and broadcasting Ken Pries have been talking this over for more than a month. At one time, it seemed like Opening Day April 6 against the Texas Rangers in Oakland was a goal worth working toward, but “I am getting, better just not that fast,” Korach said.

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Knee injury will keep Korach off A’s early spring broadcasts

Ken Korach, the longtime voice of the A’s radio broadcasts, will not be in Arizona for at least the first few weekend radio games on 95.7 The Game due to a knee injury.

It’s problematic when Korach will be able to make it to Arizona as he recovers from what he terms a “significant’’ knee injury on his left knee, which he had replaced in 2012.

Vince Cotroneo and Ray Fosse will handle the broadcasts in Korach’s stead.

Here’s the text of the letter Korach sent out through the A’s Wednesday morning:

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Series vs. A’s started Tigers’ September stumble; Legendary radio voice Bill King on Hall list again

In looking to the playoffs, how much meaning can be put in the regular season games?

The A’s and Tigers open a best-of-five American League Division Series Friday in Oakland. The last time they met was in Detroit in August. The A’s won the first three games by a cumulative 28-13 score and had a 6-3 lead in the ninth inning of the fourth game before the sweep slipped away.

One thing about the Tigers is that they haven’t been the same since that series, even though they went on to sew up the American League Central with a 93-69 record.

To that point of the season, the Tigers had played 130 games, had a 77-54 record (the A’s were 72-57), had a team batting average of .283 and had scored 662 runs or 5.1 runs per game while averaging 1.2 homers per game. The Detroit pitchers had a 3.49 ERA and had allowed less than 0.8 homers per game.

Starting with the A’s series, the Tigers hitters were never the same. Detroit’s average actually went up, to .284, but they averaged just 4.2 runs per game and less than 0.8 homers per game. And the Tigers were 16-16 during the push to October.

Not all of that can be pinned on the A’s, to be sure. Miguel Cabrera has been dealing with an abdominal injury that has limited him to just one September homer. But the fact is September has been bad for the Tigers as a whole, and the series against the A’s from Aug. 26-29 was when the downturn started.

The A’s aren’t going to assume that’s going to continue, but the Tigers are more than a little concerned. This world-wrecking offense scored one or zero runs in seven September games.

“We’ve got to score runs,’’ Tigers manager Jim Leyland told the Detroit Free Press late last month. “That’s as simple as it is. We need to get on the board with some runs.’’

That could change the way the A’s attack the Tigers. In the August series, Oakland manager Bob Melvin intentionally walked Cabrera (.348, 44 homers) on Aug. 26 in the first game of the series with runners on first and second.

That loaded the bases in a game the A’s led 8-4 to face Prince Fielder, the Tigers’ cleanup hitter and a serious home run threat. Sean Doolittle came out of the bullpen to get Fielder to fly out and the A’s went on to an 8-6 win.

On Wednesday Melvin said he ordered the walk by reliever Dan Otero because of how hot Cabrera was at the time. With Cabrera decidedly cooler, the A’s might choose to pitch to the Detroit third baseman in a similar situation this time around.

It seemed a bit of a stretch to walk Cabrera with a man on first base in August. It would seem that in the course of six weeks, it would be a sizeable stretch to do it now.

 

–It seems ridiculous that it’s taken this long for him to win, but legendary A’s radio voice Bill King was named a finalist for the Hall of Fame’s Ford C. Frick Award yet again.

Making the list of 10 is nothing new for King. It’s the seventh time he’s landed there. But he keeps getting bypassed, to the consternation of A’s fans who grew up listening to the complete radio experience that was Bill King, who also did the radio work for the Warriors and Raiders.

It’s possible there’s a game-change this year in the fact that Ken Korach just published a book about his late radio partner, “Holy Toledo,’’ that has stirred the memories of the fine broadcaster King was.

Others on the list for the award (it will be announced Dec. 11): Duane Kuiper of the Giants broadcast crew, Joe Castiglione, Jacques Doucet, Ken Harrelson, Eric Nadel, Eduardo Ortego, Mike Shannon, Dewayne Staats and Pete van Wieren.

Those choosing the winner are the 16 living recipients of the award and four broadcast historians/columnists.

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On Springer and more

The A’s apparently are closing in on a deal with free agent reliever Russ Springer. Forgive me if I don’t go overboard with anticipation.

Don’t get me wrong. Springer has had two very good years in a row. But relief pitchers are a little bit like the economy. You can use your best data to get an idea of what will happen in the coming 12 months, but in reality, it’s far too unpredictable to know for sure. So while Springer will add a nice veteran presence for a young bullpen, it’s worth noting that he hasn’t pitched in the American League — generally considered superior offensively to the National League — since he was with the then-Anaheim Angels in 1995.

That said, the A’s usually do a nice job of finding setup men. Jim Mecir, Jeff Tam, Chad Bradford, Mike Magnante, and even Ricardo Rincon (for a time) have been the right men at the right time through the years. It’ll be interesting to see if Springer can do the same.

— No brainer call by the A’s brass to re-up play-by-play man Ken Korach for another couple of seasons. I did not envy Korach when he had to step in for Lon Simmons back in 1995, but through the years, he has established himself as one of the best in the game. I’m not sure how much the kids out there still listen to games on the radio, but broadcasting that way has become a lost art. Korach maintains objectivity (a nearly extinct quality these days), regularly gives props to opponents and does a fantastic job of painting a picture. Now that the A’s are on a radio station that can be heard outside the Coliseum parking lot, do yourself a treat and tune in.

— One last note on the Jay McGwire/Mark McGwire news item last week. I asked Matt Holliday at a luncheon last Thursday whether he would care if it was revealed officially that McGwire used steroids. Holliday, who has worked on his hitting with Big Mac, predictably didn’t comment. But it seems to me that, at this point, why would we care? It would be a bit like condeming somebody for smoking in the 1950s or not wearing their seat belts in the ’70s. Mark McGwire was a product of his time and seems to have made some mistakes with his choices along the way. That would put him in company with, oh, the entire human race. But what bothers me is his lack of forthrightness. If he truly wants to help people, he needs to be honest about his experience, whatever it may have been. Living a lie, if that’s indeed what he’s doing, is an extremely dark place to be.