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Hahn wants to steal a little something from Gray’s playbook plus assorted opening notes from A’s opener with Rangers

Jesse Hahn will watch Monday's game with an idea of seeing what works for Sonny Gray against the Rangers.

Jesse Hahn will watch Monday’s game with an idea of seeing what works for Sonny Gray against the Rangers.

Jesse Hahn will be watching Sonny Gray tonight with a more discerning eye than most.

Hahn is starting the season’s second game Tuesday against the Rangers for Oakland, and he wants to see how A’s opening day starter Gray gets it done to take what he can from the performance.

Both are right-handed, but where Gray goes to his fastball first, Hahn is a sinker specialist. That doesn’t mean there isn’t something to learn.

“I’ll be looking to see what works for him,’’ Hahn said before Monday’s opener. “There are a lot of differences between us and the way we throw, but we are both aggressive and try to get outs early in the count by attacking hitters.

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Absence of Doolittle, Cook make gives A’s bullpen new look

Sean Doolittle will start the season on the disabled list, and with Ryan Cook sent to Triple-A, A's bullpen will have a different look to start 2015.

Sean Doolittle will start the season on the disabled list, and with Ryan Cook sent to Triple-A, A’s bullpen will have a different look to start 2015.

The A’s came into the spring with a surplus of bullpen arms, but February and March have whittled down at the A’s excess, although not to the point where manager Bob Melvin is particularly worried.

First the A’s learned that shoulder problems would mean that Sean Doolittle, their lefty closer, wouldn’t be able to start the season with the club. Doolittle is getting closer to playing catch, but he’s unlikely to be ready to be competitive before May.

And on Tuesday, 2012 All-Star Ryan Cook was sent to Triple-A Nashville’s roster, meaning he won’t be eligible to be in the big leagues, barring injury to someone else, for the first 10 days of the season.

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A’s hoping Crisp’s time out due to pinkeye will be short; Muncy’s RBI single drives in only run of intrasquad game

Coco Crisp will miss some time after coming down with conjunctivitis, also known as pinkeye.

Coco Crisp will miss some time after coming down with conjunctivitis, also known as pinkeye.

The A’s are looking at being without Coco Crisp for Tuesday’s start of the Cactus League season after the center fielder missed Saturday’s workout having come down with a case of pinkeye.
“He wasn’t here today; we hope he’ll be here tomorrow, but we don’t know,’’ manager Bob Melvin said.
Crisp didn’t start for nine consecutive days from Sept. 19-27, 2012, with the same problem.
“We’re hoping we’ve caught it early,’’ Melvin said. “He came in with it yesterday and we’ve got him at home now hoping this resolves itself quickly.’’
Pinkeye, known medically as conjunctivitis, manifests itself in redness as swelling of the eyelid and eye surface, which becomes red and swollen. It’s a contagious affliction, but is usually not serious and goes away in 7-10 days without medical treatment.
Crisp, who was wearing sunglasses indoors Thursday, when he talked with the media about his new iPhone game app, Coco’s Fro Patrol, didn’t start a game from Sept. 19-27 in 2012 because of pinkeye as the A’s were in the middle of their dramatic rally to edge Texas on the season’s last day for the American League West title.
“We’re hoping very much that it’s not going to take him that long this time,’’ Melvin said. “But if it had to happen, this is a good time, with so much of the spring left.’’
Even before this, Melvin wasn’t planning on putting Crisp in center field in the early going of the Cactus League, which opens Tuesday with the A’s hosting the Giants with lefty Brad Mills on the mound.
Craig Gentry and Sam Fuld have plenty of experience in center field, but Melvin pointed to infielders Matt Olson, Tyler Ladendorf, Andy Parrino and Alden Carrithers as being likely to pick up playing time with Crisp out.
The manager said he felt Crisp, who has a history of being able to return to play quickly after being sidelined, would only need one or two nine-inning games to be ready to go for the season.
Crisp, 36, is the A’s leadoff hitter and the man who usually makes the offense go. Oakland is protective of his health, and the A’s would love to see him start more than the 126 games in which he played last year.
Since 2010, the A’s are 303-252 with Crisp in the lineup, a .546 winning percentage, and 130-125 without him, .510.

–Threatening skies held off Saturday morning and early afternoon as the A’s got in a four-inning intrasquad game.
Only one run was scored, that on an RBI single by minor league infielder Max Muncy, who drove in Billy Burns. Burns was hit by a Brock Huntzinger pitch in the second, took second on an Eric Sogard single and scored on Muncy’s one-out hit.
The game was played with particular attention to the new baseball rules on batters staying in the batter’s box between pitches if they don’t swing.
“We’re just trying to get a feel for the new rules,’’ Melvin said.
Fernando Rodriguez, who threw a scoreless second inning, was singled out by the manager for his performance, as was R.J. Alvarez, who walked the first two men he faced, then came back to strike out the next two before getting an inning-ending grounder.
And then there was switch pitcher Pat Venditte. He warmed up as a left-hander, then started the inning as a right-hander against right-hander Rangel Ravelo before moving back to the left side to close out the inning.
Melvin also singled out the defensive work of outfielders Gentry and Fuld and infielders Brett Lawrie and Marcus Semien.

–Chad Smith, claimed off waivers from the Tigers, reported to camp Saturday. The A’s will work him into the pitching mix in the next day or two.
“I’m excited to be here,’’ Smith said. “You really don’t expect to be traded. You think it will be the other guy. But I have some family in the Bay Area, which is nice.

–The A’s starters for the first three games of the Cactus League season will be lefty Brad Mills, right-hander Jesse Chavez and lefty Barry Zito.
–Ryan Doolittle, the right-handed brother of A’s lefty Sean Doolittle, pitched the final half inning Saturday and showed a lively fastball.
–Alex Hassan, picked up on a waiver claim from the Orioles, should be in the A’s camp Sunday

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Alvarez no fish out of water in debut spring with A’s

R.J. Alvarez brings explosive fastball and dreams of being in A's bullpen in 2015.

R.J. Alvarez brings explosive fastball and dreams of being in A’s bullpen in 2015.

When you hear that a baseball player was just born to play the game, metaphor is in play.

In the case of A’s relief pitcher R.J. Alvarez, it’s true.

Roy and Susie Alvarez both are baseball fanatics. When their son R.J. (Roy Jr., of course) was born on June 8, 1991 in West Palm Beach, Fla., Roy Sr. met him for the first time with a gift – a baseball glove.

“I think Susie kind of expected it,’’ he said. “We dated in high school, and it was always about baseball.’’

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Alvarez a natural lefty, but he’ll stick with throwing righty

A's bullpen candidate R.J. Alvarez won't be borrowing Pat Venditte's ambidextrous glove any time soon.

A’s bullpen candidate R.J. Alvarez won’t be borrowing Pat Venditte’s ambidextrous glove any time soon.

It’s well-reported by now that they have the only ambidextrous pitcher in a big league camp in Pat Venditte.

Less well known is that they almost have two. R.J. Alvarez is a candidate to come out of the bullpen who throws touches 99 mph on the radar gun and who routinely pitches at 95 mph. He does it all from the right side.

He’s a natural left-hander, however. His father, Roy, a collegian at North Florida with an abiding passion for the game, thought R.J. was going to be an infielder, so he taught him to throw right-handed. When Alvarez turned to pitching instead midway through high school, he continued to throw right-handed.

The lefty leanings have not left him entirely, however.

“Even now when I pick up a baseball, I’ll pick it up with my left hand,’’ Alvarez said. “A lot of the time I’ll be shagging in the outfield, and I’ll do it as a left-hander.’’

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