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ALDS Game 2 wrapup: A’s show their fight once again; Coliseum had room for more than baseball

This was what Raul Ibanez meant.

Last week when I was talking with the Mariners outfielder, he praised the A’s mental toughness, their inability to stop fighting. He called them one of the grittiest clubs he had ever seen.

Saturday’s 1-0 win over Detroit was the personification of that game. They scored not a run against former Cy Young Award winner Justin Verlander for seven innings, then didn’t score in the eighth after putting two men on base.

Come the ninth inning, the A’s were still clawing. Yoenis Cespedes and Seth Smith backed up doubles, and after Josh Reddick was intentionally walked, Stephen Vogt came up with the game-winner.

On paper, the Tigers may have the better team. They certainly hit for a better average, and as good as the A’s starting pitching is, the Tigers will say theirs in better. There is no Miguel Cabrera or Justin Verlander in Oakland.

But as Ibanez was pointing out, some things can’t be measured in statistics alone.

The result makes for some very good baseball. Saturday’s game was as good an exhibition of high-quality baseball as you’re likely to see.

As Tigers manager Jim Leyland said, “This is post-season pitching. That’s what you saw tonight at its best.’’

This kind of victory actually speaks well for the A’s going forward. The Tigers have sent their best two starters at Oakland and only got a split of the games. Jarrod Parker, who pitched a solid Game 1 in Comerica Park last year, goes against the Tigers in a day game Monday, and Dan Straily, whose win on Aug. 28 came at the expense of the pitcher he’ll oppose Tuesday, Doug Fister, has been pitching as well as anyone.

–Billy Beane was asked how Saturday’s scoreless battle between starters Verlander and Sonny Gray matched up with A’s post-season pitching matchups.

Misunderstanding the question, Beane said it reminded him of the 1991 Jack Morris 10-inning 1-0 win, outlasting Atlanta’s John Smoltz, who like Morris did not allow a run.

After that, Beane came up with Barry Zito vs. Mike Mussina of the Yankees in the 2001 playoffs, and Tim Hudson vs. the Yankees Andy Pettitte, also in 2001.

The fact is this one was a classic, for most of us anyway.

Late in the game the A’s general manager brought his kids down to manager Bob Melvin’s office where they, along with A’s managing partner Lew Wolff broke out the crayons and did some coloring.

The preschoolers (not including Beane Sr. and Wolff) “didn’t even know when we scored the winning run,’’ Beane said.

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Comparing stats of the ‘Big Three’

In light of reports that former A’s pitcher Mark Mulder is retiring, I thought it’d be fun to compare the stats of the Big Three (Mulder, Tim Hudson and Barry Zito) from their Oakland careers. These are solely the numbers they compiled with the A’s, not counting their time w/other teams.

Tell us which guy you would have chosen if you needed to win one game …

Career games started
Zito 222 (4th on Oakland list)
Hudson 183 (7th)
Mulder 150

Career wins
Zito 102 (4th on Oakland list)
Hudson 92 (6th)
Mulder 81 (7th)

Career strikeouts
Zito 1,096 (4th on Oakland list)
Hudson 899 (5th)
Mulder 668 (9th)

Career ERA
Hudson 3.30 (10th on Oakland list, min. 400 innings pitched)
Zito 3.55
Mulder 3.92

Career shutouts
Hudson 8
Mulder 8 (both tied for 8th on Oakland list)
Zito 4

Career won-loss pct.
Hudson 92-39, .702 (1st on Oakland list)
Mulder 81-42, .659 (2nd)
Zito 102-63, .618 (6th)

Career Cy Young Awards
Zito 1 (2002)
Hudson 0 (finished 2nd in 2000)
Mulder 0 (finished 2nd in 2001)