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Football: Lupoi exit fallout

WITH UPDATES

Still awaiting a response from Cal and coach Jeff Tedford, who we are told was on a plane this morning. Expect to talk with him later when the question of the day, of course, is to what lengths did he and Cal go to keep Tosh Lupoi from bolting to Seattle.

It seems not all the current players knew this was coming.

Redshirt freshman defensive lineman Gabe King, on Twitter this afternoon, said of Lupoi’s exit: “he bounced, no call, no text, no subtle insinuation… Nothing.”

In the meantime, quick reaction from Cal commits:

WR Bryce Treggs tweeted: “Tosh leaving has no affect on my recruitment. I’m still solid with Cal”

And he added: “No disrespect to Coach Lupoi though. He was a great coach and a even better person”

And: “Cal’s ranking as the #1 public university in the world can’t leave and go to another school.”

From another Cal recruit whose dad played for the Bears: “@HardyNickerson: Nothing will make me change my mind I committed to cal not to a person so it’s #calgang for life”

For others, the choice is now less clear.

Arik Armstead, who may have planned to commit this morning to Cal, tweeted: “ish just got real”

Reached by the Sacramento Bee, Armstead said, “Tosh was a big reason I’d go 2 Cal.”  Added, now “I’ve got more to think about.” Armstead told the Bee he may announce Tuesday now.

This, regarding safety Shaq Thompson: @TaraFOXSports Just got off the phone with 5-star S Shaq Thompson, who says he is now torn,”I am 50-50 between #Cal and #Washington.”

Obviously, Cal’s coaches are already in damage-control mode. And if you’re defensive coordinator Clancy Pendergast or DBs coach Ashley Ambrose, you’re telling Thompson that he wasn’t going to be playing for Lupoi anyway, unless he was bulking up and moving to D-line. So why would Lupoi’s departure cause him to change schools.

There will be panic in the air about this for the short term, but if Cal’s coaches play this right they have time to patch things up. This is why oral commitments are non-binding. Teen-agers change their minds. Nothing is official until papers are signed on Feb. 1.

 

Jeff Faraudo