Part of the Bay Area News Group

Wisconsin lawmakers cut union bargaining rights

By Katy Murphy
Wednesday, March 9th, 2011 at 9:15 pm in politics, teachers.

The standoff is over, the New York Times reports.

Tonight, while the state’s Democratic senators were out of state in an attempt to block the vote on a proposal to curtail the rights of public workers, their Republican counterparts managed to push it through in less than 30 minutes.

Here’s how the Times summarizes the bill:

The bill makes significant changes to most public-sector union rules, limiting collective bargaining to matters of wages and limiting raises to changes in the Consumer Price Index unless the public approves higher raises in a referendum. It requires most unions to hold votes annually to determine whether most workers still wish to be members. And it ends the state’s collection of union dues from paychecks.

[You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.]

  • Nextset

    A great piece of work, a nice start.

    I believe the workers had better unite, but the unions have reached the point where there is a fidelity problem – the union works for it’s own management first and the workers maybe.

    Every state should be a right to work state.

  • TheTruthHurts

    It is sad that the legislature is so bought off by corporate interests that workers need unions to protect rights and a chance at the American Dream. This may help Wisconsin’s budget in the short term, but it will damage its quality of life (except for the rich) in the medium term.

    However, unions should take note that it is their overreaching that has led to this unnecessary backlash. Workers in the public sector can no longer ignore what their private sector brethren have dealt with. Private sector workers better recognize that we’ll soon get manufacturing back in the US but only because we’ll be able to compete with China on wages.

    Compromises are due all around.

  • J.R.

    Truth,

    “It is sad that the legislature is so bought off by corporate interests that workers need unions to protect rights and a chance at the American Dream”.

    Your statement does not in any way shape or form reflect reality, California’s budget for education has been at or near 50% for a great many years. The money is and has always been there, the question is where is it being allocated and how wisely.