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Oakland Fine Arts Summer School: Your (parcel) tax dollars at work

By Katy Murphy
Thursday, July 21st, 2011 at 8:05 am in budget, elections, students, the arts, Uncategorized.

So often these days, I find myself writing about the end of things. But city’s fine arts summer school — free for any child who lives in Oakland — has weathered the downturn and years of budget cuts. Why? Measure G, a $195 school parcel tax that voters renewed (and made permanent) in February 2008, in part, to support fine arts in schools.

The program moved this year from Glenview Elementary to the Fruitvale-area campus of Think College Now and International Community School. This summer, it has more than 300 kids from public and private schools. I visited with photographer Laura Oda. You can find the story here.

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  • frustrated mom

    Thanks for highlighting this camp Katy. I have tried for three years to sign up my two children who attend an Oakland public school. I am proud of my resourcefulness, but even after trying to get information as early as January to sign up, I find that the camp is full before we even have a chance. We need more camps like this for children in Oakland, so there is really space for everyone that wants to participate. When I asked why it’s so hard to get in, I was told that students who attend the school where it is held get priority.

  • Katy Murphy

    Hmm… Deitra Atkins said she let everyone in this year. There were even students from outside of Oakland, whose parents work in the city. And private schools. I wonder what happened.

  • OUSD Mom

    My experience with OUSD after six years is that programs are not widely advertised. Even if you know about a program there are usually a limited number of spots available. As was the case for summer school this year at Chabot. Spots were distributed. I agree with Frustrated Mom, we need more programs like the Arts Program as well as a summer school option for all our children in Oakland.