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Listen to what your pets have to say

By Gary Bogue
Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 at 1:25 pm in animal communication, Animals, Cats, Pets.

We need to pay close attention to our pets. They communicate with us in a lot of obvious ways with their body posture, tail movements, special sounds (purrs, whines, growls, meows) and in the ways they look at us. But it’s the subtle and unusual things they do that we need to be particularly alert for. They usually indicate something’s wrong.

My Abyssinian cat, Tut, has been following me around and meowing at me for the last couple of days. Not a lot, and nothing really obvious. A soft mew here, a gentle bump against my leg there. I really didn’t give it much thought until the other morning when I got up in the predawn darkness to go to work. Tut was waiting for me outside our bedroom door to give me a bump against my leg with his head. Hum. OK, now I’ve noticed.

Last night I brought it up with my wife, Lois. "Maybe he’s cold," she said. "I nearly froze last night."

So we got the wool comforter out of the closet and fixed up a nice warm nest for Tut in the area of the couch where he usually sleeps at night. He climbed in it right after dinner. Later, just before we went upstairs to bed, I carefully tucked the comforter over and around Tut until we could only see his eyes peering back at us out of his woolen cave.

This morning Tut was still in his warm cave as I left for work. And Lois said he was still there when she got up an hour so so later. Obviously nice and warm and happy.

Keep that in mind the next time you feel a little bump against your leg.

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4 Responses to “Listen to what your pets have to say”

  1. Janice R. Linn Says:

    TUT needs a pal to lay with. Mine get chummier in the cold weather. Their bedroom in in my laundry where I keep a couple of rugs on the washer and dryer for them. They share one, when it gets cold. The furnace is also in there, so they have a vent within a foot of them, that gets warm air first in the house. Leo is getting old and I’m looking to the day when he has trouble jumping up there. A box on the floor with a heating pad on low will be there for him when that happens. I’ll probably put it on a timer like I did when my last old cat got infirm. Tigger his buddy will probably outlive me, and I’ve shown my kids that article about the Berekely Humane Society taking care of Pets of older people, if needed. Got dogs too, but they sleep with me. ();-)

  2. Pat in Antioch Says:

    Aren’t animals amazing? How some people can say they (the animals) don’t think is beyond me! I’m sure that Tut is patting himself on the back for how well he’s got you trained Gary! I try to keep your column (and blog)out of the paws of my group; I can just imagine them emailing back & forth, comparing notes on their humans….we’d be in BIG trouble!! :-)

    Pat in Antioch

  3. Lesley A. Prentice Says:

    My 17 year old Abyssinian cat, Weazer, has a pet heating pad in his chair in the winter, they are designed for cats and dogs, and can be bought on-line from Omaha Vaccine Company for about $23.00. My 2 small dogs have them in their beds as well. As Weazer is getting older he really feels the cold….

  4. Lesley A. Prentice Says:

    My 17 year old Abyssinian cat, Weazer, has a pet heating pad in his chair in the winter, they are designed for cats and dogs, and can be bought on-line from Omaha Vaccine Company for about $23.00. My 2 small dogs have them in their beds as well. As Weazer is getting older he really feels the cold….

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