Part of the Bay Area News Group

Cat is completely toilet trained. No more litter boxes!

By Gary Bogue
Friday, March 16th, 2012 at 6:49 am in Cats.

Mr. Busy, the toilet trained cat. Photo by Lydia Larson, San Leandro, CA
1cat lydia larson san leandro

Gary:
Here are a couple of pictures of our toilet trained kitty.

Our wonderful 11-month-old kitty, “Mr. Busy,” is completely “toilet” trained.

WOW… no litter box ever again!
Lydia Larso, San Leandro, California

Lydia:
Wow is right! Does he also flush?

How about visiting my blog and adding your comments (below) on how you taught Mr. Bush to use your toilet? I suspect there are a lot of curious people, out there who would like to know! Thanks. /Gary

Mr. Busy, the toilet trained cat. Photo by Lydia Larson, San Leandro, CA
1cat2 lydia larson san leandro

[You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.]

6 Responses to “Cat is completely toilet trained. No more litter boxes!”

  1. Gayle Says:

    I thought cat feces going into the toilets was determined responsible for sea otters getting sick. Cat feces contains Toxoplasma gondii which isn’t killed at the treatment plants. Therefore it gets flushed into the ocean and potentially threatens our sea otters with the Toxo diease. Believe me, I’d love my cat box duty to be over!

  2. Joann Ludwig Says:

    From the lower picture it looks like he’s trying to figure out how to use the toilet paper, too.

    We have a cat who hops up on one side of the toilet, takes a big drink, then walks to the other side and pees in it.

  3. Rattakin Says:

    Unfortunately, I think Gayle is right. This would probably be okay with a septic tank, but the otters don’t need any more problems, thanks.

    Other than that, this is seriously cool!

  4. bette Says:

    How about getting kitty tested and treated for toxoplasmosis so its not a problem?

  5. Barbara Says:

    I think that “toxoplasmosis theory” is a little off. Not all cats carry toxoplasmosis. If they’re indoor cats it’s even more unlikely. They *can* get it by eating infected outdoor wildlife. Naturally, the very rare instance would be if the indoor cat ate an infected rodent in the garage.

    Besides, why would people waste the time toilet training an outdoor cat?

    I’d be concentrating more on NOT dumping pills down the toilet.

    Lydia — that’s one super kitty! Let me know if you’re willing to train two! : )

  6. Gary Bogue Says:

    Seems like it would be a good idea to test any cats that are using your toilet for toxoplasmosis by your vet. You don’t want any of that stuff being flushed out into the wide-wild-world … AND … you don’t want anyone in the family possibly picking it up from the toilet bowl./Gary

Leave a Reply