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Harmful algae bloom: Coast Guard rescues distressed seabirds

Coast Guard rescues seabirds in Oregon

Astoria, Oregon — Coast Guard members from Air Station Sacramento, California, load cold and wet seabirds suffering from exposure onto an HC-130 plane for transport to International Bird Rescue Research Center (IBRRC) in Fairfield, California. The federally protected loons, murrers, scoters and other seabirds were rescued by the Wildlife Center of the North Coast in Astoria, after becoming soiled by unusual sea slime caused by a harmful algae bloom along the Oregon coastline. (U.S. Coast Guard video by Petty Officer Shawn Eggert)

The staff and volunteers at IBRRC are having trouble covering the costs of saving these large numbers of distressed seabirds. You can help — please do! http://www.ibrrc.org/donate.html

Thanks for caring.You can find out lots more about this in yesterday’s (Tuesday) blog. /Gary

Posted on Wednesday, October 28th, 2009
Under: Algae, International Bird rescue research Center, Seabirds | 1 Comment »

International Bird Rescue Research Center to the rescue: Seabirds in trouble.

Stranded by harmful sea foam, caged murres waiting to be checked in at IBRRC in Fairfield. (Paul Kelway/IBRRC)
murres1 paul kelway ibrrc

The International Bird Rescue Research Center needs your help. So do a lot of seabirds that are in BIG trouble.

I just got a call from my friend Jay Holcomb, executive director of International Bird Rescue Research Center.

Jay works out of IBRRC’s bird center in Fairfield. When the Cosco Busan hit the Bay Bridge on Nov. 7, 2007, and spilled oil in the Bay, the oiled birds were taken to IBRRC for care. In my opinion, Jay and his staff and volunteers are the best in the business when it comes to caring for oiled and distressed seabirds. Jay travels all over the world to assist and advise when there’s a big spill.
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Posted on Tuesday, October 27th, 2009
Under: Algae, International Bird rescue research Center, Seabirds | No Comments »