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This Should Make You Very Angry

Ever wondered why, even though endangered California condors are dying in droves from lead poisoning, that hunters have NOT been banned from using lead shot in the supposedly protected areas where only 70 of these precious birds still live in our state?

Did you know that one Fish and Game Commissioner, Judd Hanna, just got “kicked” off the Commission by Gov. Schwarzenegger because he was in favor of banning lead shot in the condor refuge?

Hint: Think special interest groups, like the National Rifle Association.

Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, will be happy to take you on a very smelly and politically enlightening trip through his own blog on the subject if you click on: http://hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2007/09/ca-nra-adidas.html

After reading that, do you really think the Gov. is going to sign AB 821, a bill sitting on his desk that would ban hunters from using lead shot in areas populated by endangered condors? What a stupid, stupid mess. Poor condors, dying from something they don’t even understand. Sadly, neither do I.
/Gary Bogue

Posted on Friday, September 14th, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | No Comments »

KANGAROO ALERT!

SB 880 would allow the importation of kangaroo skins from Australia.
Eric Mills, coordinator of ACTION FOR ANIMALS in Oakland, sent me the following letter this morning, asking for help in defeating a state Senate bill that would contribute to the killing of thousands of Australian kangaroos. If you care about this, please make a call, send a fax, or send an e-mail protesting SB 880 and asking that it be opposed. Information on how to do this is below:

Gary:
Calls/faxes/e-mails are needed immediately.

In an unfortunate recent development, Assemblyman Fabian Nunez, Speaker of the state Assembly, has agreed to present SB 880 (Calderon) on the Assembly floor. (The bill has already passed the Senate.) As you know, SB 880 would allow the importation of kangaroo products (hides for soccer cleats, meat for pet food, back scratchers made from kangaroo forearms, coin purses made from kangaroo scrotums, etc. I’m not making this up!).

TALKING POINTS:
This bloody and inhumane trade has been banned since 1970, due to the cruelty involved. The adult kangaroos are spotlighted at night, then shot to death. Many will escape wounded, to suffer a lingering death. The joeys (babies) routinely have their heads smashed or stomped. Can you imagine the public outcry if we were to treat America’s national emblem like this? And once the animals are dead and skinned, it will be impossible to tell endangered and threatened species from the would-be “legal” trade. There’s also a concern that even more kangaroos would be killed, for the current “take” in Australia is considerably less than the given “quota.”

As Speaker of the Assembly, Mr. Nunez is the 2nd or 3rd most powerful legislator in Sacramento. We need to inundate his offices with calls/letters/e-mails of protest, both in Sacramento and in his Los Angeles home district. He especially needs to hear from his L.A. constituents.

The Assembly floor meets today (Monday, 8/27) at 1 p.m., and the bill could come up then; if not then, probably soon thereafter.

Please make those calls ASAP, and continue to urge your own Assembly member to vote NO on SB 880.

Please disperse this alert to all interested parties.

Many thanks, Eric Mills, coordinator, ACTION FOR ANIMALS

Assemblyman Fabian Nunez, Speaker of the Assembly
SACRAMENTO OFFICE
tel. 916-319-2046
fax 916-319-2146
e-mail — assemblymember.nunez@assembly.ca.gov

LOS ANGELES OFFICE
tel. 213-620-4646
fax 213-620-6319

Thanks for caring! /Gary

Posted on Monday, August 27th, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | 1 Comment »

NO MORE LIONS & TIGERS, OH MY!

Thursday, after a mysterious delay of almost four years, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service FINALLY finalized its long-awaited regulations to implement the Captive Wildlife Safety Act which Congress passed unanimously AND President Bush signed into law waaay back in late 2003.

This law prohibits interstate commerce in lions, tigers and other big cats AS PETS.

FINALLY!

This morning, The Humane Society of the United States sent me the following update on the Captive Wildlife Safety Act, which saves me a whole LOT of personal research to pull all this stuff together for you to read. Thank you, HSUS!

The HSUS says:
“Lions and tigers kept as pets in our communities are time bombs waiting to explode,” said Michael Markarian, HSUS executive vice president. “People get these animals as cubs and then are not equipped to care for them as they grow larger, but there is no place for them to go. It’s time the government cracked down on this dangerous and inhumane trade.”

Ten people have been killed by captive big cats in the United States since 2001, and many more have been injured. An estimated 10,000 to 15,000 big cats are kept in private hands in the United States, and they are readily available at exotic animal auctions and over the Internet.

The new federal rule complements the laws many states have enacted to prohibit private possession of big cats as pets. It targets the pet trade and has no impact on federally licensed facilities such as zoos. It also exempts legitimate wildlife sanctuaries, but does not exempt pseudo-sanctuaries that breed or trade the animals.

“Not only are these animals incredibly dangerous when held privately, but they hold no conservation value in backyards and basements,” noted Adam Roberts, vice president of Born Free USA. “We live in a world where lions in Africa and tigers in India are facing a downward spiral toward extinction. Our national efforts must be devoted toward saving these species in the wild.”

Similar legislation is under consideration by the U.S. Congress to protect monkeys, chimpanzees, and other primates. The Captive Primate Safety Act was introduced by Senators Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) and David Vitter (R-La.) in the Senate (S. 1498) and Representatives Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Tex.) and Mark Steven Kirk (R-Ill.) in the House (H.R. 2964). The Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works approved the bill unanimously on July 31, and it now moves to the full Senate for consideration.

Timeline for the Captive Wildlife Safety Act:
September 17, 2007 — Captive Wildlife Safety Act becomes effective
August 16, 2007 — Final regulations published in the Federal Register
January 31, 2006 — Regulations proposed for 30-day comment period
December 19, 2003 — Captive Wildlife Safety Act signed into law

You’ll find more interesting stuff about what’s happening with animals at http://www.hsus.org

Posted on Friday, August 17th, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | 5 Comments »

GET THE LEAD OUT!

Condors are dying from lead poisoning … and there aren’t … very … many … left.
Thought this letter might interest you (see below). Please do as Eric says and write your legislators and ask them to support AB 821. This is a VERY important bill. Thanks!

From Eric Mills, Action for Animals:
Assemblyman Pedro Nava (D-Santa Barbara) has introduced AB 821, which would ban the use of lead shot for hunting big game and coyotes in condor habitat. The bill has passed the Assembly, and is now on the Senate floor. It deserves broad public support.

It is enlightening to consider the dozen organizations which have submitted letters of opposition to this commonsense legislation:
California Association of Firearms Retailers, California Outdoor Heritage Alliance, California Rifle & Pistol Association, California Sportsman’s Lobby, Crossroads of the West Gun Shows, Dept. of Fish & Game, Gun Owners of California, National Rifle Association, National Shooting Sports Foundation, Outdoor Sportsmen’s Coalition of California, Safari Club International, Sporting Arms & Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute.

So much for “hunter ethics.” All legislators may be written c/o The State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814.
Sincerely, Eric Mills, coordinator ACTION FOR ANIMALS, P.O. Box 20184, Oakland, CA 94620 — 510-652-5603

As I said above, please write your legislators and ask them to save the lives of the VERY FEW remaining California condors and SUPPORT AB 821.
Thanks! /Gary

(PS: Don’t you just LOVE that list of organizations OPPOSING this bill?? Curious)

More on lead exposure and condors: http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/swcbd/species/condor/Condor-Lead-Science.pdf

Posted on Thursday, July 26th, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | No Comments »

NEW STATE ANIMAL LEGISLATION

Status of some of the California animal bills in Sacramento as of July 16
To express support or opposition for a particular bill, please write or call the bill’s author, committee chair and members of the committee where the bill will be heard (see committee list below), your own Assembly member and Senator, and the Governor.

The address for all Legislators and the Governor: (Name), State Capitol Bldg., Sacramento, CA 95814.

Phone Directory: 916-322-9900. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger: 916-445-2841.

COMMITTEES:
Assembly Appropriations Committee: Mark Leno, Chair. Mimi Walters, Anna Caballero, Mike Davis, Mark DeSaulnier, Bill Emmerson, Jared Huffman, Betty Karnette, Paul Krekorian, Doug La Malfa, Ted Lieu, Fiona Ma, Alan Nakanishi, Pedro Nava, Sharon Runner, Jose Solorio.

Senate Appropriations Committee: Tom Torlakson, Chair. Dave Cox, Sam Aanestad, Roy Ashburn, Jim Battin, Gil Cedillo, Ellen Corbett, Bob Dutton, Dean Florez, Sheila Kuehl, Jenny Oropeza, Mark Ridley-Thomas, George Runner, Joe Simitian, Darrell Steinberg, Mark Wyland, Leland Yee.

SOME OF THE BILLS MAKING THEIR WAY THROUGH THE ASSEMBLY:

*** AB 449 by Assemblywoman Audra Strickland re: Trapping. Support.
Requires trappers who trap animals for a fee (such as raccoons, opossums, coyotes, etc.) to follow American Veterinary Medical Assn. guidelines if animals are killed. Clients must be informed of options, including releasing the animals on the property.
Next Hearing: Senate Appropriations. No date. Tell the legislators trapped animals should be released and if it isn’t possible they should be killed humanely. The list of animals covered should be expanded to include bats and other animals already included in the training and testing for Fish and Game trapping licenses. See AB 1477.

*** AB 821 by Assemblyman Pedro Nava re: Hunting with Lead Shot. Support.
Enacts the Condor Preservation Act to prohibit lead shot within condor habitat.
Next Hearing: Senate Appropriations. July 16 (that’s TODAY!). NO TIME FOR MAIL, YOU NEED TO CALL. Tell them condors cannot survive against lead shot. It is banned for waterfowl hunting and should be banned for all hunting.

*** AB 828 by Assemblyman Ira Ruskin re: Wildlife Corridors. Support.
Requires the Wildlife Conservation Board to determine what areas are most essential as wildlife corridors and utilize the California Comprehensive Wildlife Action Plan to protect those corridors.
Next Hearing: Senate Appropriations. No date. Tell the legislators wildlife corridors are essential to allow migrations and prevent isolated populations.

*** AB 1477 by Assemblywoman Nell Soto re: Trapping. Support.
Requires trappers who trap animals for a fee (such as raccoons, opossums, coyotes, etc.) to have continuing education courses, release non-target animals, take injured/sick non target animals to a vet, animal control, or wildlife rehabilitation facility, and inform their clients of non lethal control options.
Next Hearing: Senate Appropriations. No date. Tell them non target animals should be immediately released and trappers should have continuing education. Non lethal methods to avoid wildlife conflicts are best for everybody. See AB 449.

*** AB 1614 by Assemblywoman Audra Stickland re: Rodeos. Support.
Lowers the definition of rodeo from four events to three in order to cover all rodeos under existing law requiring a veterinarian, or a vet on call, to treat injuries to animals and report those injuries to the Veterinary Medical Board. AB 1614 also requires a conveyance for injured animals so they are not dragged and bans electric prods.
Next Hearing: Senate Floor. No date. All rodeos should be regulated equally and all the animals deserve equal protection and veterinary care.

SOME OF THE BILLS MAKING THEIR WAY THROUGH THE SENATE:

*** SB 353 by Senator Sheila Kuehl re: Restraint Orders. Support.
Authorizes the court to add animals to restraint orders to protect them from possible harm from domestic abuse.
Next Hearing: Passed Senate and Assembly. Write Governor Schwarzenegger. Tell him animals, like other family members, are victims of revenge and abuse.

*** SB 880 by Senator Ron Calderon re: Kangaroos. Oppose.
Removes the protection, since 1970, of kangaroos by allowing the importation of their skins (used for athletic shoes) and meat (possibly pet and/or livestock food) into California as long as the kill quota is not raised in Australia.
Next Hearing: Assembly Floor. Tell your Assemblymember and Governor Arnold Schwarznegger kangaroos need California’s continued protection from cruel killing and the danger of killing/importing endangered species of kangaroo. Since the killing never meets the quota, hundreds of thousands more kangaroos can be killed for the California market. Sponsored by Adidas, they have spent over $435,000, thus far, to pass SB 880. (Kangaroo skin shoes?)

*** California Budget re: Fish and Game Wardens
Requests $3 million to fund “relocating and expanding the Warden Academy, improving the warden hiring system and pay for overtime.” It will not be spent on hiring additional wardens.
Next Hearing: Tell Governor Schwarzenegger wildlife depend on the enforcement of hunting, trapping, and fishing laws and the protection of endangered wildlife and wildlife in captivity. Fish and Game wardens are underpaid and understaffed.

CALIFORNIA FISH & GAME COMMISSION
1416 9th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

*** Turtles and Frogs in Live Animal Markets.
In August 2006 the Commission voted to “go to notice” to pass a regulation to prohibit the importation of turtles and frogs. But no action has been taken.
Write: California Fish & Game Commission. Tell them to protect our native wildlife from non-native turtles and frogs who are imported by the hundreds of thousands and commonly released depleting populations of native wildlife such as the Western Pond Turtle and the Red Legged Frog.

Many thanks to Virginia Handley of PawPAC* for compiling this information.
*PawPAC is California’s Political Action Committee for Animals. You can reach PawPAC at 415-646-0622; info@pawpac.org; http://www.pawpac.org

You can obtain official legislative information on ALL bills by going to this web site: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/bilinfo.html. By entering the number of the bill, you can access the bill text, status, committee analysis and roll call votes.

NOTE: Your non tax deductible donation to Paw PAC, PO Box 475012, San Francisco, California 94147 helps makes these alerts possible. Thanks for caring.

Posted on Monday, July 16th, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | No Comments »

ANIMAL WELFARE AND AB 1614

On-call vets to treat injured animals at rodeos
I just received this letter from my friend Eric Mills of ACTION FOR ANIMALS, who is the sponsor of AB 1614. Eric has been working hard for ages to try and make sure veterinarians are always present or on-call at rodeos so they can treat the animals that are frequently injured at such events. He has done a good job on this legislation, but needs to get one more little bill passed (AB 1614) so that charreadas (Mexican-style rodeos) will also be included in the veterinarian requirement.

Here’s what Eric has to say on the matter. He also asks for some letter writing support at the end of his letter. If you care about the welfare of animals, please take a few moments to write one of those letters. It will REALLY help! Thanks. /Gary

Dear animal person:
Anyone concerned about the welfare of animals used in rodeos and charreadas (Mexican-style rodeos) will be pleased to learn that Assembly Bill 1614 recently passed the Assembly floor by a 60:7 vote. If signed into law, the bill would amend state rodeo law (Penal Code 596.7) so as to include charreadas, now exempt by definition. The main purpose of the law is to provide for an “on call” veterinarian to treat injured animals. Seems little to ask, no?

This humane legislation, introduced by Assemblywoman Audra Strickland (R-Moorpark), is co-authored by Assembly members Lloyd Levine (D-Van Nuys), Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) and Joe Coto (D-San Jose). Mr. Coto is also chair of the 26-member Latino Caucus.

It is rare in Sacramento politics for an animal welfare bill to enjoy such bipartisan support. In the 5/24 floor vote, with one abstention, all members of the Latino Caucus voted in favor of the bill, as did the majority of the Republican Caucus. Heartfelt thanks to them all. As the late Cesar Chavez wrote to me on 12/26/90, “Kindness and compassion toward all living things is a mark of a civilized society.” Words to live by.

AB 1614 now goes to the Senate, and people are urged to write their own State Senator in support of the bill. All state legislators may be written c/o The State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814.

Eric Mills, coordinator, ACTION FOR ANIMALS, and sponsor of AB 1614

Posted on Monday, June 4th, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | 2 Comments »

California Animal Legislation as of April 1, 2007

Here are a few of the latest animal-related bills that are trying to become laws in Sacramento. Do you want them to become laws? Got a problem with one of them? Here’s your chance to let your Assemblyperson or Senator know how you feel. Address for all legislators is: State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814. Phone Directory: 916-322-9900.

** To express support/opposition to a bill: write or call the bill’s author, Committee Chair and members, and your own Assembly Member and Senator.

** Many thanks to Virginia Handley of PawPAC* for compiling this information.

*PawPAC is California’s Political Action Committee for Animals. You can reach PawPAC at 415-646-0622; info@pawpac.org; http://www.pawpac.org.

** You can obtain official legislative information by going to this web site: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/bilinfo.html. By entering the number of the bill, you can access the bill text, status, committee analysis and roll call votes.

** Your non tax deductible donation to Paw PAC, PO Box 475012, San Francisco, California 94147 helps makes these alerts possible.

ASSEMBLY BILLS
AB 594 by Assemblyman Mervyn Dymally re: Farm Animals (Support).
Mandates farm animals must be able to stand, lie down, get up, move their heads freely, rest, turn around, and extend all limbs and wings by 2013. Exempts farm animals in transportation, research, rodeos, fairs, 4-H, slaughter, vet care, and 7 days prior to pigs giving birth.
Hearing: Assembly Agriculture. April 10. Tell them all animals deserve the basic right to move freely even when confined.

AB 777 by Assemblyman Lloyd Levine re: Elephants.
Prohibits bullhooks, chaining unless for medical treatment, and mandates enrichments, seven feet deep pools, soft flooring, and the ability to walk five miles a day. Requirements on enrichments, pools, flooring, and space do not apply to existing facilities unless they expend capital funds.
Hearing: Assembly Public Safety. No date set. Also, Assembly Arts and Entertainment. Tell them elephants deserve a quality of life with enrichments (with or without expending capital funds) and freedom from cruel bullhooks and chains.

AB 821 by Assemblyman Pedro Nava re: Hunting with Lead Shot (Support).
Enacts the Condor Preservation Act to prohibit lead shot within condor habitat and, as funding is available, provide hunters with free non-lead ammunition.
Hearing: Assembly Water, Parks, and Wildlife. No date set. Tell them condors cannot survive against lead shot. It is banned for waterfowl hunting and should be banned from all hunting.

AB 828 by Assemblyman Ira Ruskin re: Wildlife Corridors (Support).
Requires the Wildlife Conservation Board to determine what areas are most essential as wildlife corridors and utilize the California Comprehensive Wildlife Action Plan to protect those corridors.
Hearing: Assembly Water, Parks, and Wildlife. April 24. Tell them wildlife corridors are needed to allow migrations and prevent isolated populations.

AB 923 by Assemblywoman Lois Wolk re: Wildlife Action Plan (Support).
Requires the Department of Fish and Game to create an advisory committee to implement the California Wildlife Action Plan to protect and conserve nongame species not covered under the Endangered Species Act.
Hearing: Assembly Water, Parks, and Wildlife. April 10. Tell them the Wildlife Action Plan needs implementation and guidance from environmentalists.

AB 1634 by Assemblyman Lloyd Levine re: Spay/Neuter (Support).
Requires any four month old dog or cat to be spayed or neutered unless he/she is a purebred registered with a purebred organization or a service dog. Expect amendments.
Hearing: Assembly Business and Professions. April 10. Tell them pet overpopulation costs hundreds of thousands of lives and millions of dollars. But being a purebred is no assurance of health, mental or physical.

SENATE BILLS
SB 695 by Senator Pat Wiggins re: Game Wardens (Support).
Makes pay to Fish and Game wardens equal to other law enforcement.
Hearing: Senate Public Employment. No date set. Tell them our wildlife depend on wardens for
protection from poaching and our underpaid wardens risk their lives to do their jobs.

SB 880 by Senator Ron Calderon re: Kangaroos (Oppose).
Removes the prohibition on the importation of kangaroo products unless they are endangered.
Hearing: Senate Natural Resources. May 8. Tell them kangaroos need California’s continued
protection from cruel killing and importation for sports shoes.

Posted on Tuesday, April 3rd, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | No Comments »

California Animal Legislation as of March 8, 2007

Here are the latest animal-related bills that are trying to become laws in Sacramento. Got a problem with one of them? Would you like any of them to become laws? Let your Assemblyperson or Senator know how you feel. Address for all legislators is: State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814.

Many thanks to Virginia Handley of PawPAC* for compiling this information.

*PawPAC is California’s Political Action Committee for Animals. You can reach PawPAC at 415-646-0622; info@pawpac.org; http://www.pawpac.org.

You can obtain official legislative information by going to this web site: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/bilinfo.html. By entering the number of the bill, you can access the bill text, status, committee analysis and roll call votes.

ASSEMBLY BILLS
AB 31 by Assemblyman Kevin DeLeon re: Urban Parks.
Increases the number of counties who can apply for grants under the Urban Park Act of 2006 by lowering the definition of “heavily urbanized county” from a population of 500,000 to 350,000, thus increasing wildlife habitat.

AB 64 by Assemblywoman Patty Berg re: Emergencies.
Enacts the Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act, including licensed veterinarians and vet techs from out of state, to allow them to practice in California during emergencies. AB 64 can help to implement last year’s AB 450 to include animals in disaster plans.

AB 222 by Assemblyman Bill Emmerson re: Undomesticated Burros.
Authorizes the capture, removal, and relocation of undomesticated burros from private land at the request of the landowner if the burros are at risk of injury from dangers such as traffic or insufficient habitat. The burros may not be sold for slaughter but may be moved to a sanctuary.

AB 594 by Assemblyman Mervyn Dymally re: Farm Animals.
Mandates farm animals must be able to stand, lie down, get up, move their heads freely, rest, turn around, and extend all limbs and wings by 2013. Exempts farm animals in transportation, research, rodeos, fairs, 4-H, slaughter, vet care, and 7 days prior to pigs giving birth.

AB 667 by Assemblyman Cameron Smyth re: Police Dogs and Horses.
Increases the penalty for anyone who strikes, beats, kicks, cuts, stabs, shoots, poisons, or in any manner seriously injures a police horse or dog from 16 months in jail to three, five or seven years.

AB 670 by Assemblyman Todd Spitzer re: Animal Bites.
Requires an owner of an animal who has bitten someone to provide the person who has been bitten his/her name, address, telephone, name and breed of the animal, and proof of rabies vaccination. The bite need not to have broken the skin.

AB 777 by Assemblyman Lloyd Levine re: Elephants.
Prohibits bullhooks, chaining unless for medical treatment, and mandates enrichments, seven feet deep pools, soft flooring, and the ability to walk five miles a day. Requirements on enrichments, pools, flooring, and space do not apply to existing facilities unless they expend capital funds.

AB 815 by Assemblyman Tom Berryhill re: Hunting/Fishing.
Prohibits any city or county from enacting a local ordinance that affects hunting or fishing unless it endangers human life. AB 815 could inhibit Boards of Supervisors from prohibiting anterless deer hunts.

AB 821 by Assemblyman Pedro Nava re: Hunting with Lead Shot.
Enacts the Condor Preservation Act to prohibit lead shot within condor habitat and, as funding is available, provide hunters with free non-lead ammunition.

AB 828 by Assemblyman Ira Ruskin re: Wildlife Corridors.
Requires the Wildlife Conservation Board to determine what areas are most essential as wildlife corridors and utilize the California Comprehensive Wildlife Action Plan to protect those corridors.

AB 912 by Assemblywoman Nicole Parra re: Hunting.
Creates a mentored hunting program that allows anyone to hunt small game, upland game birds, and waterfowl without a license for a year if accompanied by a qualified mentor.

AB 923 by Assemblywoman Lois Wolk re: Wildlife Action Plan.
Requires the Department of Fish and Game to create an advisory committee to implement the California Wildlife Action Plan to protect and conserve nongame species not covered under the Endangered Species Act.

AB 939 by Assemblywoman Nell Soto re: Teachers.
Prohibits the hiring of any teacher who has been convicted of a felony for cruelty to animals.

AB 1016 by Assemblyman George Plescia re: Race Horses.
Allows race horse breeders, trainers, boarders, to sell any horse worth less than $4,000 to pay for unpaid bills without having to go through a court.

AB 1066 by Assemblyman John Laird re: Global Warming.
Requires local governments to consider the impacts of climate change when preparing a coastal program for Coastal Commission approval and requires the Commission to assist them in obtaining grants to defray the cost of mitigating the impacts.

AB 1143 by Assemblyman Bill Maze re: Endangered Species.
Makes a nonsubstansive change to the endangered species law. Amendments should be expected.

AB 1347 by Assemblywoman Anna Caballero re: Pet Shops.
Declares the intent of the Legislature to establish standards of care for animals in pet shops. Amendments should be expected.

AB 1614 by Assemblywoman Audra Stickland re: Rodeos.
Lowers the definition of rodeo from four events to three in order to cover more rodeos, such as charreadas, under existing law requiring a veterinarian, or a vet on call, to treat injuries to animals.

AB 1634 by Assemblyman Lloyd Levine re: Spay/Neuter.
Requires any four month old dog or cat to be spayed or neutered unless he/she is a purebred registered with one of several purebred organizations such as the American Kennel Club or International Cat Association.

SENATE BILLS
SB 353 by Senator Sheila Kuehl re: Restraint Orders.
Authorizes the court to add animals to restraint orders to protect them from possible harm from domestic abuse.

SB 863 by Senator Leland Yee re: Horse Racing.
Expresses the intent of the Legislature to encourage horse breeding to ensure a sufficient supply for horse racing in California.

SCR 9 by Senator Darrell Steinberg re: Spay Day 2007.
Declares February 27 as Spay Day 2007 and encourages spaying and neutering to combat pet overpopulation.

SCR 19 by Senator Gloria Negrete-McLeod re: West Nile Virus.
Declares April 23 to 29 as West Nile Virus Awareness Week. West Nile Virus causes meningitis, encephalitis, and death to horses, avian species, wildlife, and humans.

CALIFORNIA FISH & GAME COMMISSION
1416 – 9TH St., Sacramento, CA 95814

Hunting and Trapping Regulations
The Commission has voted to consider banning lead shot In the condor habitat. They also plan to increase “hunting opportunities” for junior hunts, archery hunts, and trophy hunting. Next Hearing: April 12 or 13, Bodega Bay. Write: California Fish & Game Commission. Ask them to include requirements for the humane trapping and handling of “nuisance” wildlife. Support a ban on lead shot, the leading cause of condor mortality.

Turtles and Frogs in Live Animal Markets.
The Commission voted to “go to notice” to pass a regulation to prohibit the importation of turtles and frogs for the live animal markets. But no action has been taken to submit any regulation. Write: California Fish & Game Commission. Tell them to protect our native wildlife from non-native turtles and frogs who are imported by the hundreds of thousands and commonly released depleting populations of native wildlife such as the Western Pond Turtle and the Red Legged Frog.

Siskiyou Mountain Salamander. Oppose
The timber industry wants to delist the salamander as a threatened species. Next Hearing: April 12 or 13, Bodega Bay. Write: California Fish and Game Commission. Tell them the salamander has a limited range and clear cutting is their greatest threat.

Advisory Committee on Humane Treatment of Wild Animals.
The Committee advises the Department on inspection procedures to enforce permit requirements including minimum standards for wild animals in captivity. Next Meeting: April 25, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 1416 – 9th St., Room 1206, Sacramento.

Marjorie Davis Resolution
Marjorie Davis, 86, of Wildlife Fawn Rescue received a Resolution from the Legislature presented by Assemblywoman Patty Berg in appreciation of her decades of work in fawn rehabilitation and for her authorship of “Leap to Freedom” a compilation of true stories. Write: Wildlife Fawn Rescue, PO Box 5, Kenwood, California 95452. Congratulate and thank her for all she has done for wildlife.

For copies of bills: www.leginfo.ca.gov.

List compiled by Virginia Handley. 415-646-0622 or 415-474-4021; info@pawpac.org.

** Your donation to Paw PAC, PO Box 475012, San Francisco, California 94147, helps makes this alert possible. **

Posted on Thursday, March 8th, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | No Comments »

California Legislative Alert 1/1/07

**Many thanks to Virginia Handley (virginia@animalswitchboard.org) for compiling this information on animal-related legislation, and to Rose Lernberg for sending it out … and for giving me permission to reprint it here so more people can have a chance to read it. They’re the best!**

California Legislative Alert 1/1/07
You can obtain official legislative information by going to this web site: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/bilinfo.html
By entering the number of the bill, you can access the bill text, status, committee analyses and roll call votes.

Next Legislative Meeting: Monday, Jan. 8, 2007. 10 a.m. to Noon, Room 113, State Capitol Building, Sacramento.

Agenda: New Legislation, Expected Legislation, Possible Legislation. Regulations. All animal advocates welcome.

The 2007-2008 Legislative Session begins Jan. 3, 2007. Deadline for submission of possible bills is Jan. 26.

Deadline for introduction of new bills is Feb. 23.

CALIFORNIA FISH & GAME COMMISSION
1416 – 9th St., Sacramento, CA 95814

Trapping Regulations
The Fish & Game Department will propose trapping regulations and will write an Environmental Document. The Commission is required to "consider the welfare of individual animals" and in the past each document had a chapter on it. The Department has changed it from "welfare" to "effects" in an effort to get away from the concept of welfare.

AB 87 passed in 2006 to make it clear that "pest" control operators do not have to get a Fish & Game license to trap mice, rats, gophers and moles. SB 1645, passed in 2002, requires "nuisance" and predator control wildlife trappers to get a Fish & Game license to trap coyotes, raccoons, opossums, skunks, etc. Many trappers do not tell their customers that the animals will be killed if not released on site. Nor do many of them have licenses due to lack of enforcement.

Next Hearing: Feb. 1 or 2, Monterey.

Write: California Fish & Game Commission. Tell them to reinstate the chapter entitled "Welfare of the Individual Animal" as required by law for the Commission to consider. Ask them to enforce the existing law requiring "nuisance" and predator control trappers to have licenses and ask that the list of licensed trappers be available to the public. Also ask that they include specific requirements for the humane handling of wildlife, including bats.

Turtles and Frogs in Live Animal Markets.
The Commission voted to "go to notice" to pass a regulation to prohibit the importation of turtles and frogs for the live animal markets. But the Department has taken no action to submit the regulation. They are telling the Commission that the issue is the responsibility of the Health Dept., Food & Ag. Dept. and local animal control.

Next Hearing: Feb. 1 or 2 in Monterey.

Write: California Fish & Game Commission. Tell them to follow through on their legal action to protect our native wildlife from the non-native turtles and frogs who are imported by the hundreds of thousands (frogs by the ton) and commonly released. They deplete populations of California wildlife such as the endangered Western Pond Turtle and the Red Legged Frog. The importation also contributes to the illegal pet trade of baby turtles born to captured wild turtles for the market.

Advisory Committee on Humane Treatment of Wild Animals.
The Fish & Game Department has advised the Committee that they should conduct meetings under the Open Meeting Act to avoid any possible lawsuit. That means the public can attend and participate in the meetings. The Committee advises the Department on inspection procedures to enforce permit requirements and minimum standards for keeping wild animals in captivity.

Next Meeting: Jan. 25, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 1416 ­ 9th St., Room 1206, Sacramento.

CALIFORNIA COASTAL COMMISSION
45 Fremont St. #2000, San Francisco, CA 94105. 415-904-5200

Navy Sonar. Oppose. The Navy plans military exercises starting in February off the southern California Coast that includes mid-frequency sonar training to find enemy submarines. Sonar puts out ear-splitting noise that impacts all sea life, including migrating whales.

Next Hearing: Jan. 10, 200 S. Pine, Long Beach

Write: California Coastal Commission. Tell them that the sonar should not be allowed. It is extremely destructive and painful. Its negative impacts are well documented but ignored by the Navy.

CALIFORNIA VETERINARY MEDICAL BOARD
1420 Howe Ave., Sacramento, CA 95825. 916-263-2610

Rodeo Injury Reports
Current law requires veterinarians who cover rodeos to report injuries to the Vet Med. Board. 2006 had no report and 2005 had only one. Veterinarians are not complying or, when on-call, are not being called. The Vet Board should make it clear to the vets that not reporting is a violation of law and clarify what specific information is required in the report.

Next Meeting: Jan. 24 at UC Davis or Sacramento.

Write: California Vet Med. Board. Tell them current law is not serving the animals without their cooperation and instruction.

Posted on Friday, January 5th, 2007
Under: Animal protection legislation | No Comments »

Did your state Reps vote to protect animals and the environment?

PawPAC, California’s political action committee for animals (since 1980), has just released its 2006 Voting Record for the State Legislature, along with its endorsement recommendations for the November election.

Find out how your state representatives did on legislation to protect animals and the environment. You might be surprised.

For a copy of the chart, please contact PawPAC, P.O. Box 475012, San Francisco, CA 94147-5012, or call 415-646-0622. Or you can read everything on their Web site at http://www.pawpac.org/.

Posted on Wednesday, October 11th, 2006
Under: Animal protection legislation | No Comments »