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Hayward City Council candidate: Mark Salinas

salinas01MARK SALINAS
  • Age: 39
  • Job: College professor, nonprofit director
  • Education: Chabot College and San Francisco State
  • Prior elected offices: None
  • In Hayward: 39 years
  • Family: Wife
  • Favorite Hayward spots: Buffalo Bill’s Brewery, Acapulco Taqueria
  • Website: http://salinasforhayward.com/
  • This is the third of six profiles of the candidates in the Hayward City Council race. Two seats are up for election on the June 8 ballot.

    HAYWARD — On a Thursday morning during spring break, Mark Salinas was riding herd on a couple dozen young volunteers and about 100 younger charges.

    There was French toast and scrambled eggs to be served and literacy to be taught — the usual fare dished up hot and educational at The Kids’ Breakfast Club.

    “You hear there aren’t any success stories coming from Hayward schools,” he said, and then gestured at the volunteers. “I have 30 of them right here. They’re on break, and they’re donating their time and efforts to community service. “… This right here is the future of Hayward.”

    Salinas, a college professor and executive director of The Kids’ Breakfast Club, said he shares a core value with those volunteers — leadership through service — and will keep their interests close to his heart if he is elected to City Council in June.

    “These kids are going to be living with the legacy of the decisions we make in the next five to seven years,” he said. “The next City Council will have an impact for at least 25 to 30 years. You cannot get more future-minded than that.”

    Children in Hayward need to be encouraged to stick around, he said, and young families need to be given a fair shake.

    Salinas, 39, was born in Hayward and said he intends to spend the rest of his life in his hometown. He wants it to be a place where other people are encouraged to do the same.

    “If you look at the development projects being conceptualized today, around South Hayward BART and the Mission (Boulevard) Corridor, those two planning projects are going to be key to the future,” he said. “We have young families, and they’re going to be looking for good, clean, healthy, affordable places to live, so they can raise a family and send them to good schools.”

    He said he’s got a lot in common with people in such a place in life, and they need representation.

    “Every decision I make, I’m going to think about people like me,” he said. “Those young families, with good jobs, and still living month to month. I have a lot of respect for my colleagues, but I can speak to experiences. This is a living reality for me.”

    Salinas believes that forming new partnerships with existing nonprofits, the business community and academia will go far to foster new ideas and make them realities, and that his experience working with such entities — in addition to the director of a nonprofit, he is on the Measure I Bond Oversight Committee and a founding member of the Latino Business Round Table — make him an ideal facilitator.

    “We can take existing mechanisms and collaborate,” he said. “For example, we have a premier business school at (Cal State East Bay). Why not invest more there? Have a student competition for business plans in downtown Hayward. Get ideas from potential entrepreneurs for different products and services, and give the winner some seed money.”

    Salinas said he knows the city has its share of problems, but is very optimistic.

    “I really believe there’s a lot of good in Hayward right now,” he said. “A lot of things could be better, but we need to build on what’s good. “… It’s about thinking about the next generation, what kind of city they would like us to give them.”

    Eric Kurhi covers Hayward. Contact him at 510-293-2473. Follow him at Twitter.com/erickurhi. All six candidate profiles — and a forum in which to discuss them — will be available as they appear at www.ibabuzz.com/hayward.

    Eric Kurhi

    • Cosmo

      Mr. Salinas, please stop calling yourself a professor as you do on your campaign website. It seems ironic and amusing that someone as involved in the field of education as Mr. Salinas appears to be doesn’t seem to recognize the distinction between that of professor and other collegiate terms for faculty. Within academia, the term professor generally refers to a college or university instructor whom holds tenure, publishes or peer reviews research, posseses a doctoral degree in their field, or holds a position of rank within their department such as a department chair or head. One or any combination of these conditions might suffice. A professor holds an esteemed position and title than many a lecturers, instructors, assistant professors, or adjunct professors might strive for. Mr. Salinas needs to reign in his ego or ignorance and call himself for what he really is: a teacher, instructor or lecturer.

    • Jim Skoonberg

      Mark Salinas came to my home today to campagn for city council in Hayward. He skirted around every question that I asked him.He is a typical liberal politician who has no real answers for the problems of this city. But I guess that is true of all people who are in our government.
      I asked him about gang violence and he told me he helps with a breakfast program. That is very nice of him. but he failed to give me an answer other than a political one. We need to stop the gangs now before Hayward is a ghost town due to the takeover by gangs like in Mexico.

    • Works in Hayward

      Cosmo, if you’re going to comment on an online article in the manner in which you seem to do (quite often), and the topic of your comment is the terminology used by the subject of the article (professor vs. instructor…), check your grammar first. Your usage of “reign” is incorrect. The correct spelling is R-E-I-N. You know, like the ones Santa holds on Christmas Eve.

      I’m sorry but I could not let this one slide. Your point seems to be counterbalanced by your own inconsistencies. Pay attention to the spell check.

    • John W. Kyle

      Mr. Skoonberg;

      Have you ever gone door to door seeking votes for a candidateto City Council or School Board Trusteeship?

      A wise solicitor soon develops the idea that generality is th wisest course even though that route is not always acceptable.

      i RECALL ONE OCCASION WHEN AS i CAMPAIGNED FOR A PERESON SEEKING TO BECOME mAYOR, THE QUESTION WAS POSED TO ME…. hOW DOES HE STAND ON ABORTION?

      RECOGNIZING THAT THE LADY ASKING THE QUESTION WAS WEARING SEVERAL TATOOS, I ANSWERED A QUESTION WITH THE QUESTION, “WHAT DOES THAT HAVE TO DO WITH A CITY COUNCIL WHICH HAS NO DIRECT JURISDICTION OR POWER TO DEAL WITH THAT QUESTION?”

      I DID THAT SORT OF WORK FOR YEARS BEFORE TAKING A FLING AT ELECTION TO HAYWARD COUNCIL. BEING A CHILD BORN IN OAKLAND NOT TOO LONG AFTER THE 1929 CRASH AND RAISED THERE DURING THE DEPRESSION, I LEARNED WELL THE NEED RFOR BEING THRIFTY.

      SEEKING NEED FOR USE OF A PHOTO TO BE PUBLISHED IN MY CAMPAIGN, MATERIALS. I THOUGHT TO MYSELF THAT IT WOULD BE WELL TO INCLUDE MY WIFE IN THE PHOTO, FOR TWO REASONS:

      1.) WE OUGHT PROVIDE A PHOTO TO OUR CHILDREN AS A CHRISTMAS GIFT!

      2.) IT WAS FOR TWO REASONS A ‘TWO FER’ SINCE SPOUSE HAD DONE EXTENSIVE VOLUNTEER EFFORT AT ST. JOACHIN’S WHILE OUR FOUR CHILDREN ATTENDED SCHOOL THERE, THEN LATER AT ALL SIANTS CHURCH WHERE THE SENIOR CITIZENS ACTIVITIES AND SINGULAR OPPORTUNITY TO PROVIDE TRANSPORT OF PRIESTS TO AND FROM CONVALESCENT AND ‘REST HOME’ FACILITIES, BROUGHT HER INTO MUCH FACIAL RECOGNITION.

      CAN YOU IMAGINE MY SURPRISE WHEN THE USE OF HER ATTRACTIVE IMAGE WAS SEEN AS AN ATTACK UPON THE GAY CANDIDATE?

      THUS DID I LEARN NOT TO GO DOOR TO DOOR FOR ANY CANDIDATE IN FUTURE ELECTIONS. EVEN DURING THE VOTE FOR THE lIBRARY RE-PLACEMENT WAS CONDUCTED, I RAN INTO SOME PRETTY CONFUSED PEOPLE WHO FAILED TO SEE THE BENEFIT OF A LARGER LIBRARY IN HAYWARD. ‘NO’ IS THE EASIEST WORD IN OUR LANGUAGE!

      THE BASIC PROBLEM IS THE WIDESPREAD VIEW THAT POLITICS ARE DIRTY! TIE THAT TO THE PERSONAL OBSERVATI8ON THAT A GREAT MANY VOTERS JUST CAN NOT BE BOTHERED IN ANY ATTEMPT TO ANALYZE ISSUES. ‘NO’ IS WIDELY THOUGHT TO BE THE Easy substitute for serious thought…. a concept widely employed by voters in HAYWARD.

      CANDIDATES GOING DOOR TO DOOR SEEKING VOTES ARE COURAGEOUIS FOLK…… GIVE THEN CREDIT AT LEAST FOR THAT EFFORT TO OPEN POSSIBLE COMMUNICATION WITH SERIOUS VOTERS.

    • Passive Observer

      Re: Cosmo.

      How ironic that you incorrectly used the word “reign” when asking Mr. Salinas to “reign in his ignorance…”

      The correct word is rein.

      Mr. Salinas’ optimism for Hayward is what’s on the ballot, not his academic title. I read all the profiles of the candidates in this series and I find Mr. Salinas one of the more notable candidates. I like Mr. Oiwa as well, but feel he hasn’t raised enough money to get his message out. I have yet to decide who will get my second vote, but Mr. Salinas and his dedication to making Hayward an optimistic place works for me.

    • Vince Scolari

      @ Cosmo.
      Are you an angry Ex-Student of his or something? Because it REALLY seems like it. Seriously, stop playing your Atari 2600 and and get some sun, it’s healthy for you… Try it sometime.

    • One of Salinas’ current students.

      Mark Salinas is an amazing professor. This is my first time taking Mexican American history with him and he’s taught me and my classmates at Chabot College so much. It’s sad to me to see people be so harsh towards him. He does nothing but good for our community.

    • Michael Moore

      One of …Students,
      You should post more often here, providing your point of view. Do try though to get on a more current post. Welcome to HayWord.