Part of the Bay Area News Group

STAR results are out, some gains made

By Eric Kurhi
Monday, August 15th, 2011 at 5:22 pm in Alameda County, Castro Valley, Cherryland, General, Hayward, Schools.

The Standardized Testing and Reporting results came out today, find our overview story here with links to data. While Hayward as a district remains considerably below both the state and Alameda County averages for proficiency in math and reading, both areas did see some progress. For English, 40.7 percent of kids tested proficient, compared with 39 percent in 2010 and 36.4 percent in 2009. In math, 37.3 percent tested proficient this year, compared with 35 percent last year and 32 percent in 2009.

Quick comparisons: San Leandro came in at 46 percent proficient in English, 36.4 percent in math, with about a 1.5 percentage point gain in each. San Lorenzo had 42.9 percent proficient in English, 36.9 percent in math, both down by a fraction of a percent from last year. Castro Valley had 73.6 percent proficient in English, up from 70.6 percent, and 65.5 percent proficient in math, up one percentage point.

Some individual Hayward schools had impressive results, as you can see on this chart.

“We are particularly pleased with the results at Longwood, Harder and Burbank,” wrote Leticia Salinas, a director of academic affairs with the district, in an email.  ”Under state and HUSD board guidelines, these schools put in reform efforts that had phenomenal gains.  We are so pleased with the work that Longwood, Burbank, and Harder have accomplished.  These schools  worked  with a focus on collaboration as a school community and targeted professional development in the areas of standards and assessment.   For example, in English Language Arts at grade 2, the percent proficient/advanced increased 23%  at Burbank , 16% at Harder and 15% at Longwood at 2nd grade.  The teachers, students, principals, and parents accomplished so much!”

Here’s a list of Hayward schools and the change in the proficiency score from last year, double-digit gains bolded, declines in red:

Bowman Elementary -3.51%
Brenkwitz High -0.10%
Bret Harte Middle -1.96%
Burbank Elementary +13.75%
Chavez (Cesar) Middle +1.40%
Cherryland Elementary -1.61%
East Avenue Elementary -6.37%
Eden Gardens Elementary +2.22%
ldridge Elementary +4.19%
Fairview Elementary +2.66%
Faith Ringgold School of Arts +17.95%
Glassbrook Elementary -6.48%
Golden Oak Montessori of Haywa +5.15%
Harder Elementary +8.30%
Hayward High +1.22%
Impact Academy of Arts & Techn +17.96%
Leadership Public Schools +11.80%
Longwood Elementary +13.12%
Lorin A. Eden Elementary +4.74%
Martin Luther King, Jr. Midd +3.31%
Mt. Eden High +0.97%
Ochoa (Anthony W.) Middle +7.71%
Palma Ceia Elementary -4.75%
Park Elementary -1.10%
Ruus Elementary -1.35%
Schafer Park Elementary +4.11%
Southgate Elementary +2.58%
Stonebrae Elementary +1.34%
Strobridge Elementary +7.83%
Tennyson High +4.67%
Treeview Elementary +2.26%
Tyrrell Elementary -4.25%
Winton Middle -0.22%

Find the lengthy press release from the state after the jump:

2011 STAR Results Show Steady Improvement Statewide

RESEDA—California’s students continue to steadily improve their performance across the board, with a larger proportion than ever scoring proficient or higher on the 2011 Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program exams in English–language arts, mathematics, science, and history–social science, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced today.

Approximately 4.7 million students participated in the 2011 STAR program, with 54 percent scoring proficient or above in English-language arts and 50 percent scoring at proficient or above in mathematics, the highest percentage since the program’s inception in 2003.

The full results can be found on the California Department of Education Standardized Testing and Reporting Web page at http://star.cde.ca.gov/.

“The significant and sustained improvements we’ve seen for nine consecutive years prove how hard teachers, school employees, administrators, and parents are working to help students achieve despite budget cuts that have affected our schools,” Torlakson said. “Their heroic teamwork is paying off for California.”

Coming a week after the release of his Transition Advisory Team’s report,

A Blueprint for Great Schools focusing on preparing students to succeed in the global economy, Torlakson also noted that the STAR results show more students both taking and scoring as proficient or above in science and mathematics areas.

Some 55 percent of students taking the Summative High School Mathematics exam scored proficient or above and 49 percent of students taking the biology exam scored proficient or above.

“California had 44,000 more students proficient in Summative High School Mathematics and 147,000 more students testing proficient in biology than just eight years ago,” Torlakson said. “That’s significant progress, and it shows the enormous potential we have to accomplish even more as we carry out the Blueprint for Great Schools and focus on preparing even more students to thrive in our competitive economy.”

While the STAR results show an increase in proficiency levels among all subgroups, a troubling and persistent achievement gap exists for African American, Latino, English-learner, and low-income students, compared to their peers.

“We have more work to do to make sure every student receives the world-class education he or she deserves and has the opportunity to achieve their dreams and contribute to the success of our state,” Torlakson said. “I’m committed to that effort—and to working with California’s leaders to provide our schools and our communities with the resources they need.”

Under the STAR program, California students attain one of five levels of performance for each subject tested: advanced, proficient, basic, below basic, and far below basic.

The State Board of Education has established the “proficient” level as the desired achievement goal for all students. That level represents a solid performance in which students demonstrate a competent and adequate understanding of the knowledge and skills measured by the assessment at a particular grade, in a particular content area. This achievement goal is consistent with school growth targets for state accountability and requirements of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The state target is for all students to score at the proficient or advanced level.

In the nine years since all the CSTs have been completely aligned to the California content standards, the percentage of students scoring at the proficient or advanced level increased by 19 points in English–language arts, or from 35 percent to 54 percent (Table 1); and 15 points in mathematics, from 35 percent to 50 percent (Table 6).

Since last year, the percentage of students at or above the proficient level increased by 2 points in English–language arts and 2 points in mathematics (Table 1 and Table 6, respectively).

The STAR Program consists of the following exams:

  • California Standards Tests (CSTs), standards-based tests that measure the achievement of state content standards for English–language arts, mathematics, science, and history–social science.
  • California Modified Assessment (CMA), designed for students with disabilities whose individualized education program team determines that the CMA is appropriate and who meet State Board of Education-adopted eligibility criteria. The CMA is designed to provide students an accessible assessment of their achievement of the California content standards for English–language arts, mathematics, and science.
  • California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA), for students who have significant cognitive disabilities and assesses them in the content areas of English–language arts, mathematics, and science.
  • Standards-based Tests in Spanish (STS), for Spanish-speaking, English learner students who either receive instruction in Spanish or have been enrolled in a school in the United States for less than 12 months. The STS assesses these students in reading/language arts and mathematics. Students who complete the STS also complete the CST and/or CMA for their grade level.

The results of these exams, with the exception of the STS, are included in state and federal accountability reports. Students who complete the STS also complete the CST and/or CMA for their grade level.

# # # #

 

The California Department of Education (CDE) is a state agency led by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson. For more information, please visit http://www.cde.ca.gov or by mobile device at http://m.cde.ca.gov/. You may also follow Superintendent Torlakson on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/TorlaksonSSPI and Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/CAEducation.

 

 

Attachments

Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program:

Summary of 2011 Results

Background

  • The 2011 STAR Program consists of four key components, including the California Standards Tests (CSTs); the California Modified Assessment (CMA); the California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA); and the Standards-based Tests in Spanish (STS).
  • In spring 2011, the following CSTs were required for all students:

–    English–language arts (ELA) for grades two through eleven;

–    Mathematics for grades two through nine;

–    Science for grades five, eight, and ten (life science);

–    History–social science for grades eight and eleven (U.S. history).

  • Students also were able to take end-of-course tests in mathematics (grades seven through eleven), science (grades nine through eleven), and history–social science (grades nine through eleven) if they were scheduled to complete the corresponding courses by the end of the school year.
  • In 2011, students who had an individualized education program (IEP) and met the State Board of Education-adopted eligibility criteria were able to take the CMA for ELA in grades three through eleven, the CMA for mathematics in grades three through eleven, the CMA for Algebra I, the CMA for Geometry, and the CMA for science in grades five, eight, and ten (life science) instead of the corresponding grade-level and content-area CSTs. Students in grade eight who took the CMA for ELA and/or science were also required to take the CST for history–social science.
  • Students with disabilities who were unable to take the CSTs with accommodations or modifications or were unable to take the CMA with accommodations took the CAPA in ELA, mathematics, and science (approximately 1 percent of the tested population).
  • Spanish-speaking English learners (ELs) who either received instruction in Spanish or were enrolled in a school in the United States for less than 12 months were required to take the STS in addition to the CSTs or CMA. At the option of the school district, schools may have also tested Spanish-speaking ELs who had been in school in the United States 12 months or more who were not receiving instruction in Spanish.

Reporting STAR Program Results

  • Five performance levels are used for reporting the results for all assessments in the STAR Program: advanced, proficient, basic, below basic, and far below basic. The state target is for all students to score at the proficient level or above (advanced). The percentage of students scoring at each performance level is reported by grade and subject for all students and for student subgroups.
  • With the inclusion of the CMA in the STAR Program, caution may be needed when interpreting STAR results at the district and school levels, depending on the number of students who were assessed using the CMA.
  • Because the grade ten and eleven CMA for ELA and the CMA for Geometry are in the standard-setting process, the proficiency levels for these assessments have not yet been assigned. Student reports, therefore, will show only raw scores and the percent of items correct in those grades and subjects.

Summary of CST Results

A summary of statewide student performance on the CSTs follows, organized by content area. Note that while final data for years 2003 through 2010 are available, the results reported for 2011 are preliminary and include only the results for students who tested through June 30, 2011.

English–Language Arts

  • This year, students in nearly every grade level showed an increase in the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above on the ELA CSTs with the exception of grade six.
  • The percentage of students in grades two through eleven scoring at the proficient level and above increased approximately 19 percentage points between 2003 and 2011. The one-year increase in 2011 was 2 percentage points (see Table 1).
  • Since 2003, the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above in grade eight has increased by 26 percentage points; in grade four by 25 percentage points; in grade five by 23 percentage points; in grade seven by 21 percentage points; and in grade two by 20 percentage points. In 2011, grades two, eight, and ten showed the greatest one-year increase of 3 percentage points (see Table 1).
  • The percentage of students in grades two through eleven scoring at the below basic and far below basic levels decreased approximately 13 percentage points between 2003 and 2011 (see Table 2).
  • The percentage of students scoring at the below basic and far below basic levels in grade eight decreased by 17 percentage points since 2003. Grade seven showed the next greatest decrease in the percentage scoring below basic and far below basic with a decrease of 15 percentage points. The greatest one-year decrease of 4 percentage points was shown by students in grade eleven. The next greatest one-year decrease of 3 percentage points was shown by students in grades nine and ten (see Table 2).
  • Filipino students showing the greatest improvement since 2003 in achieving the proficient level and above (an increase of 23 percentage points). Hispanic or Latino students increased their achievement of the proficient level and above by 22 percentage points. Asian students increased their achievement of the proficient level and above by 21 percentage points. Black or African American students increased their achievement of the proficient level and above by 19 percentage points. Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander students and White students increased their achievement of the proficient level and above by 18 percentage points. American Indian or Alaskan Native students increased their achievement of the proficient level and above by 16 percentage points (see Table 3).
  • For 2011, the percentage of not economically disadvantaged Black or African American students achieving the proficient level and above is the same as the percentage of economically disadvantaged white students (53 percent). The percentage of not economically disadvantaged Hispanic or Latino students achieving the proficient level and above (57 percent) is four points above that of the economically disadvantaged white students (see Tables 4 and 5).

Mathematics

  • In 2011, the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above in mathematics showed a one-year increase of approximately 2 percentage points. From 2003 to 2011, the overall percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above increased by 15 percentage points (see Table 6).
  • From 2010 to 2011, all grade-level and end-of-course results showed an increase in the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above. The largest one-year increase was 4 percentage points in grade two and in Geometry, increasing from 62 percent to 66 percent of students in grade two and from 27 percent to 31 percent of students taking the CST for Geometry (see Table 6).
  • Between 2003 and 2011, the increase in the percentage of students in grades two through seven taking the grade-level mathematics CSTs and achieving the proficient level and above reached double digits: grade five, 28 percentage points; grade four, 26 percentage points; grade three, 22 percentage points; grade seven, 20 percentage points; grade six, 19 percentage points; and grade two, 13 percentage points. During the same time period, the increase in the percentage of students achieving the proficient level and above on the CST for Algebra I and Summative High School Mathematics also reached double digits, with an increase of 11 percentage points and 12 percentage points respectively (see Table 6).
  • In 2011, the percentage of students scoring at the below basic and far below basic levels in mathematics showed a one-year decrease of approximately 1 percentage point. From 2003 to 2011, the overall percentage of students scoring at the below basic and far below basic levels decreased by 11 percentage points (see Table 7).
  • The number of students taking the CST for Algebra I showed, continuing last year’s trend, a decrease of 11,276 between 2010 and 2011. The number of students taking the CST for Geometry showed a first-time decrease, which numbered 2,112. The numbers of students taking the CSTs for Algebra II and Summative High School Mathematics continued an upward trend, with an increase of 12,233 and 9,358, respectively (see Table 8).
  • The subgroups of students showing the greatest one-year improvement in 2011 in achieving the proficient level and above were economically disadvantaged students, students receiving special education services, and English learners, with an increase of 3 percentage points each (see Table 9).
  • The racial/ethnic subgroups of students showing the greatest improvement since 2003 in the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above were Filipino students and Hispanic or Latino students, with an increase of 18 percentage points. Asian students increased their achievement of the proficient level and above by 16 percentage points, followed by Black or African American students and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander students by 15 percentage points. White students increased their achievement of the proficient level and above by 14 percentage points. American Indian or Alaska Native students increased their achievement of the proficient level and above by 11 percentage points (see Table 9).

 

  • For 2011, the percentage of not economically disadvantaged Black or African American students achieving the proficient level and above (40 percent) is seven percentage points lower than economically disadvantaged white students. The percentage of not economically disadvantaged Hispanic or Latino students achieving the proficient level and above (48 percent) is one point above that of the economically disadvantaged white students (see Tables 10 and 11).

 

Science

  • In 2011, the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above across all grade-level tests increased by 3 percentage points. Grade five showed an increase of 3 percentage points and grades eight and ten showed the greatest one-year increase of 4 percentage points each. Notable gains were also seen in all grade levels since the assessments were first administered (see Table 12).
  • From 2010 to 2011, all grade-level and end-of-course results showed an increase in the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above. The largest one-year increase was 4 percentage points in grades eight, ten, and in Integrated 2, increasing from 59 percent to 63 percent of students in grade eight, from 46 percent to 50 percent of students in grade ten, and from 15 percent to 19 percent of students taking the Integrated 2 (see Tables 12 and 13).
  • The percentage of students achieving at the proficient level and above has increased on all end-of-course tests since 2003, with the greatest increase has been on the CST for Physics, at 23 percentage points during that time period. Gains for all of the end-of-course tests made between 2010 and 2011 were 3 percentage points, while those same tests showed gains of 14 percentage points between 2003 and 2011 (see Table 13).
  • In 2011, approximately 1.2 million students in grades nine through eleven took science end-of-course CSTs. Between 2010 and 2011, the number of students taking the CST for Biology increased by 6,715, and the number of students taking the CST for Chemistry increased by 8,474. Since 2003, the number of students taking the CST for Biology has increased by 218,801, the greatest increase among the science end-of-course CSTs. Though the number of test-takers is decreasing over the past two years, for Earth Science, there is an increase of 126,180 students taking that test since 2003. Within the same period, notably, the number of students taking the CST for Chemistry increased by 111,866 (see Table 14).

History–Social Science

  • The number of students who scored at the proficient level and above on the grade-eight CST for History–Social Science increased by 3 percentage points between 2010 and 2011 and by 23 percentage points between the years of 2003 and 2011 (see Table 15).
  • In 2011, the number of students achieving the proficient level and above on the grade-eleven CST for U.S. History increased by 3 percentage points, a gain of 14 percentage points between the years of 2003 and 2011 (see Table 15).
  • The percentage of students in grades nine, ten, and eleven achieving the proficient level and above on the end-of-course CST for World History increased by 2 percentage point between 2010 and 2011 yet gained 17 percentage points between the years 2003 and 2011 (see Table 15).

Summary of CMA Results

  • The CMA was first administered in grades three through five in 2008, grades six through eight in 2009, grade nine in 2010, and grades ten and eleven in 2011.
  • The percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above on the CMA for ELA in grades four, five, and eight increased by 5 percentage points (see Table 16).
  • From 2010 to 2011, the largest increases in the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above were for the CMA for mathematics in grade five, at 7 percentage points; and for science in grade eight, at 6 percentage points (see Table 16).
  • Since 2008, performance in grade five on the CMA for Mathematics has increased by 15 percentage points (see Table 16).

Summary of STS Results

  • From 2010 to 2011, the majority of the STS results for reading/language arts (RLA) and mathematics showed an increase in the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above. The largest increase in the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above was in mathematics for grade seven at 5 percentage points (see Table 17).
  • From 2008 to 2011, the largest increase in the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above for RLA was 7 percentage points in grade four, from 30 to 37 (see Table 17).
  • From 2008 to 2011, the largest increase in students achieving at the proficient level and above in mathematics was in grade four, which increased by 10 percentage points, from 48 to 58. Grades two and three mathematics showed increases of 7 and 6 percentage points respectively (see Table 17).
  • Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program:
  • Summary of 2011 Results
  •  
  • Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program
    California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • English–Language Arts
  • Table 1: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*

Grade

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

2

36

35

42

47

48

48

53

53

56

3

20

3

33

30

31

36

37

38

44

44

46

2

13

4

39

39

47

49

51

55

61

63

64

1

25

5

36

40

43

43

44

48

54

58

59

1

23

6

36

36

38

41

42

47

52

56

55

-1

19

7

36

36

43

43

46

49

54

55

57

2

21

8

31

33

39

41

41

45

48

54

57

3

26

9

38

37

43

43

47

49

50

54

55

1

17

10

33

35

36

37

37

41

44

45

48

3

15

11

32

32

36

36

37

37

40

43

45

2

13

State Total 2 – 11

35

35

40

42

43

46

50

52

54

2

19

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in grades two through eleven. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • English–Language Arts
  • Table 2: Percentage of Students Scoring at Below Basic and Far Below Basic*

 

Grade

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

2

32

35

31

27

26

24

21

21

20

-1

-12

3

37

39

37

32

32

28

29

25

24

-1

-13

4

26

27

23

23

20

16

14

14

12

-2

-14

5

29

29

25

26

23

19

17

15

16

1

-13

6

29

29

28

27

26

21

18

16

15

-1

-14

7

32

30

27

28

26

25

18

18

17

-1

-15

8

35

31

28

26

27

25

22

19

18

-1

-17

9

31

33

30

30

26

25

23

21

18

-3

-13

10

36

35

34

35

34

31

27

26

23

-3

-13

11

39

38

37

40

39

37

35

30

26

-4

-13

State Total 2 – 11

32

32

30

29

28

25

23

21

19

-2

-13

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in grades two through eleven. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • English–Language Arts
  • Table 3: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above by Subgroup*

 

Subgroup

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

All Students

35

36

40

42

43

46

50

52

54

2

19

Gender
Female

39

40

44

46

47

50

54

56

58

2

19

Male

31

32

36

38

39

42

46

49

51

2

20

Race or Ethnicity**
Black or African American

22

23

27

29

30

33

37

39

41

2

19

American Indian or Alaska Native

31

31

35

37

39

40

44

45

47

2

16

Asian

55

57

61

64

66

69

72

74

76

2

21

Filipino

48

50

55

58

60

62

66

69

71

2

23

Hispanic or Latino

20

20

25

27

29

32

37

40

42

2

22

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

31

31

36

39

40

43

47

48

49

1

18

White

53

54

58

60

62

64

68

69

71

2

18

Two or More Races

62

64

2

Economic Status
Economically Disadvantaged

20

20

25

27

29

32

36

39

42

3

22

Not Economically Disadvantaged

49

50

56

58

60

62

67

69

71

2

22

Disability Status
Students Received Special Education Services

9

10

11

13

13

15

19

21

26

5

17

Students with no Reported Disability

38

38

43

45

46

49

52

54

56

2

18

English Proficiency
English Only Students

44

44

49

50

52

54

58

60

61

1

17

Initially-Fluent English Proficient (I-FEP)

46

48

53

56

58

62

66

69

70

1

24

Reclassified-Fluent English Proficient (R-FEP)

40

42

48

50

51

55

58

61

63

2

23

English Learners

10

10

12

14

15

16

20

21

23

2

13

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2010 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in grades two through eleven. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Ethnicity and race categories changed in 2010 and 2011 to meet federal requirements. Use caution when comparing to previous years.
  •  
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • English–Language Arts
  • Table 4: Percentage of Economically Disadvantaged Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*
Race or Ethnicity

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010**

2011**

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

Black or African American

16

17

20

22

24

26

31

33

36

3

20

American Indian or Alaska Native

20

21

25

27

28

30

34

36

38

2

18

Asian

35

37

42

46

48

51

55

59

61

2

26

Filipino

37

39

44

47

49

51

55

59

61

2

24

Hispanic or Latino

16

17

21

23

25

28

33

36

39

3

23

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

21

21

26

29

30

32

37

40

41

1

20

White

32

32

37

39

40

43

48

51

53

2

21

Two or More Races

45

48

3

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in grades two through eleven. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Ethnicity and race categories changed in 2010 and 2011 to meet federal requirements. Use caution when comparing to previous years.
  • Table 5: Percentage of Not Economically Disadvantaged Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*
Race or Ethnicity

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010**

2011**

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

Black or African American

31

32

36

38

40

43

47

50

53

3

22

American Indian or Alaska Native

41

41

46

48

49

51

56

57

59

2

18

Asian

69

70

74

76

77

79

83

84

85

1

16

Filipino

53

55

60

62

64

67

71

74

76

2

23

Hispanic or Latino

32

33

38

40

42

45

50

54

57

3

25

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

40

40

45

48

50

53

57

59

60

1

20

White

58

59

64

66

67

69

73

75

77

2

19

Two or More Races

71

73

2

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in grades two through eleven. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Ethnicity and race categories changed in 2010 and 2011 to meet federal requirements. Use caution when comparing to previous years.
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • Mathematics
  • Table 6: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*

 

Grade

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

Grade 2

53

51

56

58

59

59

63

62

66

4

13

Grade 3

46

48

54

57

58

61

64

65

68

3

22

Grade 4

45

45

50

54

56

61

66

68

71

3

26

Grade 5

35

38

44

48

49

51

57

60

63

3

28

Grade 6

34

35

40

42

42

44

49

52

53

1

19

Grade 7

30

33

37

41

39

41

43

49

50

1

20

General Mathematics

20

20

22

22

21

27

26

27

28

1

8

Algebra I

21

18

19

23

24

25

28

31

32

1

11

                First time test takers

26

28

31

33

36

3

10**

                Repeat test takers

15

17

21

22

24

2

9**

Geometry

26

24

26

26

24

24

26

27

31

4

5

Algebra II

29

24

26

25

27

27

28

31

33

2

4

Summative High School Mathematics

43

41

45

46

47

47

50

54

55

1

12

Integrated 1

7

7

7

9

9

11

11

13

14

1

7

State Total Grades 2 – 7 and End-of-Course tests

35

34

38

41

41

43

46

48

50

2

15

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the states. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Data shows changes between 2007 and 2011.
  • Prior to 2007, Algebra I was an end-of-course test for grades eight through eleven students. Beginning in 2007, students in grades seven were allowed to take the Algebra I test.
  • Note: The results for Integrated Mathematics 2 and 3 are not reported due to the small numbers of test-takers.
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • Mathematics
  • Table 7: Percentage of Students Scoring at Below Basic and Far Below Basic *

 

Grade

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

 2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

Grade 2

25

25

22

20

19

19

17

18

17

-1

-8

Grade 3

30

27

23

22

22

17

16

14

13

-1

-17

Grade 4

28

27

24

22

19

16

14

13

12

-1

-16

Grade 5

39

35

32

31

30

25

22

19

17

-2

-22

Grade 6

36

34

33

31

29

28

25

22

22

0

-14

Grade 7

38

38

36

33

33

30

26

23

22

-1

-16

General Mathematics

48

49

47

47

44

45

43

43

42

-1

-6

Algebra I

50

56

51

53

50

49

49

45

44

-1

-6

Geometry

45

45

46

48

50

52

51

46

43

-3

-2

Algebra II

43

47

46

48

46

44

44

41

38

-3

-5

Summative High School Mathematics

34

30

27

26

29

26

26

23

22

-1

-12

State Total Grades 2 – 7 and End-of-Course tests

38

38

35

35

34

32

30

28

27

-1

-11

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the states. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • Prior to 2007, Algebra I was an end-of-course test for grades eight through eleven students. Beginning in 2007, students in grades seven were allowed to take the Algebra I test.
  • Note: The results for Integrated Mathematics 2 and 3 are not reported due to the small numbers of test-takers.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • Mathematics
  • Table 8: Numbers of Students Tested*


Test

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Number
2010-2010

Change in Number
2003-2011

General Mathematics

451,126

417,946

374,900

340,335

307,656

289,686

259,494

222,325

200,923

-21,402

-250,203

Algebra I

505,883

614,347

681,924

707,285

744,814

748,690

758,859

751,042

739,766

-11,276

233,883

Geometry

270,560

301,112

333,334

359,926

371,118

384,024

399,539

410,368

408,256

-2,112

137,696

Algebra II

162,672

181,883

196,079

213,770

231,335

239,643

251,251

265,517

277,750

12,233

115,078

Sum. High School Mathematics

76,560

80,574

90,983

99,348

108,972

116,085

123,776

130,720

140,078

9,358

63,518

Integrated 1

14,359

9,679

8,716

6,771

7,071

8,872

9,969

11,354

12,018

664

-2,341

Integrated 2

9,733

7,905

6,698

4,273

3,647

4,319

4,085

3,844

4,507

663

-5,226

Integrated 3

10,043

4,424

3,558

2,223

1,661

1,483

1,373

797

734

-63

-9,309

Total

1,500,936

1,617,870

1,696,192

1,733,931

1,776,274

1,792,802

1,808,346

1,795,967

1,784,032

-11,935

283,096

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • The CMA was introduced in 2008. As a result, an estimated 16,800 students in grades seven through eleven are now taking a CMA mathematics test. These students are not included in this table.
  •  
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • Mathematics
  • Table 9: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above by Subgroup*


Subgroup

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

All Students

35

34

38

41

41

43

46

48

50

2

15

Gender
Female

34

34

38

40

40

42

46

48

50

2

16

Male

35

35

39

41

41

43

46

48

50

2

15

Race or Ethnicity**
Black or African American

19

19

22

25

25

27

30

32

34

2

15

American Indian or Alaska Native

29

28

32

34

34

36

39

40

40

0

11

Asian

60

60

65

67

67

70

72

74

76

2

16

Filipino

44

45

50

53

53

55

59

60

62

2

18

Hispanic or Latino

23

23

27

30

30

33

36

39

41

2

18

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

31

31

35

38

38

40

43

43

46

3

15

White

47

46

51

53

53

54

57

59

61

2

14

Two or More Races

54

59

5

Economic Status
Economically Disadvantaged

24

24

28

30

31

33

37

39

42

3

18

Not Economically Disadvantaged

45

44

49

52

52

54

57

60

62

2

17

Disability Status
Students Received Special Education Services

13

13

15

16

16

19

22

24

27

3

14

Students with no Reported Disability

37

36

41

43

43

45

48

50

52

2

15

English Proficiency
English Only Students

39

39

43

45

45

47

50

52

54

2

15

Initially-Fluent English Proficient (I-FEP)

45

45

49

52

53

55

57

59

60

1

15

Reclassified-Fluent English Proficient
(R-FEP)

37

37

41

43

42

45

47

50

52

2

15

English Learners

20

20

23

25

26

28

32

34

37

3

17

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Ethnicity and race categories changed in 2010 and 2011 to meet federal requirements. Use caution when comparing to previous years.
  •  
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • Mathematics
  • Table 10: Percentage of Economically Disadvantaged Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*


Race or Ethnicity

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010**

2011**

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

Black or African American

16

16

19

21

21

24

27

29

31

2

15

American Indian or Alaska Native

23

22

26

28

28

30

34

34

36

2

13

Asian

45

46

51

53

54

56

59

62

64

2

19

Filipino

40

41

46

49

48

50

53

54

56

2

16

Hispanic or Latino

21

21

26

28

28

31

34

37

40

3

19

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

25

25

29

32

33

34

38

39

42

3

17

White

33

32

36

38

37

40

43

45

47

2

14

Two or More Races

41

46

5

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Ethnicity and race categories changed in 2010 and 2011 to meet federal requirements. Use caution when comparing to previous years.
  • Table 11: Percentage of Not Economically Disadvantaged Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*
Race or Ethnicity

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010**

2011**

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

Black or African American

24

24

27

30

30

33

36

38

40

2

16

American Indian or Alaska Native

35

34

38

40

40

42

45

46

46

0

11

Asian

71

70

74

76

76

77

80

82

84

2

13

Filipino

46

46

52

55

55

58

61

63

65

2

19

Hispanic or Latino

29

29

33

35

36

38

42

45

48

3

19

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

37

36

40

43

44

46

48

49

51

2

14

White

51

50

54

57

56

58

61

63

65

2

14

Two or More Races

62

66

4

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Ethnicity and race categories changed in 2010 and 2011 to meet federal requirements. Use caution when comparing to previous years.
  •  
  • California Standards Test Results, 2004–2011
  • Science—Grade Level Tests*
  • Table 12: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above


Grade

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2004–2011

5

24

28

32

37

46

49

55

58

3

34

8

38

42

52

56

59

63

4

25**

10

34

35

40

44

46

50

4

16**

State Total 5, 8, & 10

35

38

46

50

54

57

3

22**

  • *The Grade Five California Science Standards Test was first administered in spring 2004. The Grade Eight and the Grade Ten California Life Science Standards Tests were first administered during spring 2006.
  • **Data show changes between 2006 and 2011.
  • Data for 2004 through 2010 are final statewide data. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • Science—End-of-Course Tests (Grades Nine Through Eleven)
  • Table 13: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*

Test

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

Earth Science

21

22

23

23

26

28

28

33

35

2

14

Biology

37

30

32

35

37

42

42

46

49

3

12

Chemistry

31

28

27

27

31

32

36

37

38

1

7

Physics

29

29

31

32

35

43

46

49

52

3

23

Integrated 1

7

5

8

9

10

11

13

17

20

3

13

Integrated 2

8

8

6

5

7

11

15

15

19

4

11

State Total for End-of-Course Tests

29

24

27

28

31

35

36

40

43

3

14

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • Note: The results for Integrated Science 3 and 4 are not reported due to the small numbers of test-takers.
  •  
  • California Standards Test Results, 2003–2011
  • Science—End-of-Course (Grades Nine Through Eleven)
  • Table 14: Numbers of Students Tested*


Test

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Number
2010-2011

Change in Number
2003-2011

Earth Science

89,676

134,953

173,958

195,394

207,246

224,873

226,308

218,463

215,856

-2,607

126,180

Biology

334,005

397,909

453,685

498,204

507,155

525,332

535,179

546,091

552,806

6,715

218,801

Chemistry

153,491

181,420

196,700

213,387

227,866

232,506

247,306

256,883

265,357

8,474

111,866

Physics

44,878

52,586

59,382

61,088

63,450

64,199

67,845

72,847

76,144

3,297

31,266

Integrated 1

62,008

101,824

111,366

107,068

96,818

76,050

69,602

64,360

54,877

-9,483

-7,131

Integrated 2

25,983

24,654

20,629

17,407

13,822

7,791

4,647

5,352

4,119

-1,233

-21,864

Integrated 3

10,621

5,870

3,414

2,540

2,006

1,963

1,744

1,351

1,286

-65

-9,335

Integrated 4

1,515

1,601

1,040

817

960

431

624

363

157

-206

-1,358

Total

722,177

900,817

1,020,174

1,095,905

1,119,323

1,133,145

1,153,255

1,165,710

1,170,602

4,892

448,425

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • History–Social Science
  • Table 15: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*

Grade

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2003–2011

8

27

27

31

34

35

36

42

47

50

3

23

11 (U.S. History)

34

32

37

35

35

38

44

45

48

3

14

World History (End-of-Course)

27

27

31

30

29

33

38

42

44

2

17

State Total 8, 11 Plus End-of-Course Test

29

28

33

33

33

36

41

44

48

4

19

  • *Data for 2003 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Standards Tests (CSTs) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • Prior to 2007, the world history test was an end-of-course test for grade ten students only. Starting in 2007, students in grades nine through eleven took the end-of-course world history.
  • Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program
    California Modified Assessment, 2008–2011
  • Table 16: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*


% Proficient & Above ELA

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2008–2011

Grade 3

27

27

27

29

2

2

Grade 4

28

30

31

36

5

8

Grade 5

28

35

32

37

5

9

Grade 6

26

29

30

1

4**

Grade 7

25

28

31

3

6**

Grade 8

25

25

30

5

5**

Grade 9

18

% Proficient & Above Mathematics

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2008–2011

Grade 3

32

33

37

36

-1

4

Grade 4

32

35

38

40

2

8

Grade 5

31

36

39

46

7

15

Grade 6

31

34

33

-1

2**

Grade 7

24

26

23

-3

-1**

Algebra I

12

% Proficient & Above Science

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2009–2010

Change in Percentage
2008–2010

Grade 5

36

42

45

45

0

9

Grade 8

28

31

37

6

9**

Grade 10 Life Science

18

  • *Data for 2008 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the California Modified Assessment (CMA) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Data show changes between 2009 and 2011.
  • Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program
    Standards-based Tests in Spanish, 2008–2011
  • Table 17: Percentage of Students Scoring at Proficient and Above*


% Proficient & Above RLA

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2008–2011

Grade 2

36

40

35

39

4

3

Grade 3

34

37

36

36

0

2

Grade 4

30

35

34

37

3

7

Grade 5

27

28

29

1

2**

Grade 6

30

29

32

3

2**

Grade 7

31

30

35

5

4**

% Proficient & Above Mathematics

2008

2009

2010

2011

Change in Percentage
2010–2011

Change in Percentage
2008–2011

Grade 2

51

53

56

58

2

7

Grade 3

50

50

55

56

1

6

Grade 4

48

52

57

58

1

10

Grade 5

42

45

49

4

7**

Grade 6

36

39

35

-4

-1**

Grade 7

24

26

30

4

6**

  • *Data for 2008 through 2010 are final statewide results. The 2011 data are preliminary and include results for approximately 99% of the students in the state. Complete results will be available during September 2011. This table includes results from the Standards-based Tests in Spanish (STS) only. Percentages included in this table may differ from the percentages printed on the Internet reports due to rounding.
  • **Data show changes between 2009 and 2011.
  • Students who completed the STS also completed the grade-level CST and/or CMA (if designated in the student’s IEP). Results from the STS are not used in state and federal accountability

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • qodrn

    Hayward has much to improve upon. Clearly, though, some schools, students and parents worked very hard to improve things. Nice to see both charter and district schools moving up.

  • http://BoothmanSr@sbcglobal.net Kathi Booth

    Perhaps HUSD needs to look at those schools that have been successful and try to employ the methodology they are using. Sometimes it would help if the teachers were involved in the process…those who have had success could easily share their techniques with their colleagues…Hmmm maybe we don’t need those expensive consultants from outside to come in here. Just a thought.

  • Michael Moore

    The best thing a parent can do is to get their kids enrolled in the Castro Valley School District.

  • http://BoothmanSr@sbcglobal.net Kathi Booth

    LOL

  • teachermama

    Or move to Vermont.

  • Jeff

    If the housing market would just recover just a little bit and if I an lucky enough to break even on my house. I will be moving my family to San Ramon.

  • qodrn

    Sad to say, it appears those staying in Hayward can’t afford to move or can send their kids elsewhere, or pick what public school to send them to. Clearly, Hayward is becoming the dumping ground for the county, even over Oakland. Sad.

  • http://BoothmanSr@sbcglobal.net Kathi Booth

    It is sad, but until the public, parents, students and teachers rise up and shout NO MORE! and demand that things change from the top down, whether that is a recall of the current board or a total change in the top brass administration it will never change. We have all become too complacent, willing to just abdicate our duty to children, because somehow we have been led to believe that we are too “stupid” or uneducated to decide or advise. Well I say, those who are doing it now certainly don’t seem to know any better! I have no children in HUSD, but that does not mean that I don’t care about the success of students. My efforts to improve the lives and education of children in Hayward has spanned over two decades..I do not toot my horn, nor do I broadcast what I have done and continue to do for children..I just do it! I am willing to stand shoulder to shoulder with those who wish to make a real change in HUSD, a radical change, a positive change.

  • John Kyle

    All;

    I am annoyed by the content of items 2 and 3 above!
    Four schools which are struggling to improve are Longwood, Cherryland, Strobridge and Fairview. They are all located in zip code area 94541. At long last Longwood is showing signs of success. It’s past record has had adverse effect upon the Market Value of my home, unless of course I seek out prospective purchasers possessed of interest in the closely located St. Joachim’s Parochial School.

    It is interesting to note that the four public schools located in Zip code area 94541 are required to deal with the presence of a very high count of parenting individuals presently on parole or probation. There are no other zip code areas within the Hayward Unified school district service area which deal with such a density of parolees and probationers.

    There is incredible statistical data available which supports the statement that 40% of parolees are returned to prison with the first 12 months of their release; 50% are returned within the first two years. Some argue that the California State Prison system data is erroneous and the reported rate of recidivism at the conclusion of the third year is too low and that it might range within a rate of 65% to 70%.

    Regardless of the above data, Hayward and Oakland have a very high count of older housing which dates back in time, well over 100 years ago… going back to the point in time when no cement or brick manufacturers had yet arrived upon the development scene of Alameda County.

    You might still find occupied dwellings in Oakland which were constructed upon rough-hewn redwood logs used as foundation materials in antiquated housing still used by low income families.

    Zip code area 94541 has seen a considerable amount of low cost housing built since the conclusion of WW II. We know with certainty that this zip code area has the highest count of parolees laid down upon HUSD by unfairly imposed quotas for ‘low income housing’ while Pleasanton has historically refused construction of such housing as recommended by the Association of Bay Area Governments, ( ABAG)!

    Where Oakland and Hayward school districts serve in excess of 50% of the low income housing needs of Alameda County’s parolees, Pleasanton has just five (5) of those individuals living within that City. It has lost a trial on that subject… but the fact remains that they make no effort to rectify the problem.

    Consider that as a consequence of the excessive presence of paroled individuals, that their rate of recidivism affects the success of their children’s school and the School District, when they are almost constantly on the move…

    I openly suggest that what needs to occur is a review of the ADA money which we know to be seriously affected by truancy and transiency in Hayward while Pleasanton does not experience that problem.

    So, if Pleasanton receives the same remuneration of say $30. per day of attendance per student, the state ought now consider reducing that by 25% and award that sum to Oakland and Hayward on a rational basis. The same idea ought apply to Dublin and Livermore!

    I urge readers to think about that and act in whatever manner it takes to make effective change; rather than engage in useless, destructive rant against HUSD leadership.

    Perhaps even the officers of HEA might see the point. Thus to make more effective use of their waning influence in Hayward as well as in Sacramento!
    Parolees are thought to have many children enrolled in HUSD schools. It is my opinion that the rate of recidivism has serious affect upon classroom truancy and transiency factors and that this is compounded by lack of attention directed to the problem.

    Stop complaining about the HUSD administration. Sit down and think about the injustice done to our community when a City such as Pleasanton ignores the Association of Bay Area Governments .

  • qodrn

    Back to the geese. Apparently Canadian Geese are protected under some migratory bird act. You can’t kill em or mess up their nests. However, if you are being buried in geese feathers and other stuff, you can apply to be an egg addler which means you get permission to shake the eggs like heck and hope the little birdies croak. But, only the owners of property where the birds live can addle the eggs. If you can find the nests which are really hidden. Enter Loose’s Goose Patrol. The esteemed city of Foster City pays this company about $30,000 to oversee addling of the goose eggs in its parks.

    According to Loose’s, the humane way to get the geese leave is to chase them periodicly with working dogs. (Foster City fired the dogs) Anyway, that’s what the Hayward School District does. During the month of July, you all paid $1120 for Loose to get the Canadian Geese at HUSD(Mount Eden’s fields). They have been working on this for 8 years in Foster City. Still have geese all over the place.

    Anyway, wouldn’t it cheaper just to have the marching band walk around the baseball field and the football field? They have to practice anyway. I would also think the baseball/football season would be a bit goose relocator.

    Now, I want to know if a team player were to ko a goose, how liable is the school district? After all, a violation of the migratory bird act has international implications.

  • qodrn

    Correct mistakes (some) after $30,000 add “per year”

    bit = big

  • John Kyle

    All;

    With any luck the Hayword Blog will also die of disinterest fever!

    Poor Booth! Poor Moore! Lucky HUSD!

  • The Silent Observer

    I have been watching our web-footed friends from the great white north for quite a few years now. They have no fear of humans. When boys at the elementary school chase them, they just spread out their wings and trot around the field. The alpha males usually hiss and hold their ground. I’m sure there are a lot of dogs in Hayward willing to chase the geese for no fee at all. The Canada Goose is a handsome animal, they resemble large black and tan sundaes! (Fenton’s or C.V. Creamery)

  • Eric Kurhi

    Fascinating stuff regarding the geese… wondering if there’s a story there. Here’s more on egg addling.

  • The Silent Observer

    My 5th grader told me that someone on the school staff brought their dog to chase away the geese today. Ha!