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Senior Scam Stopper planned for June 21

CASTRO VALLEY -- Seniors are often targeted in scams. To help them become more aware of current frauds, Assemblyman Bill Quirk and the Contractors State License Board are holding a free Senior Scam Stopper event Friday, June 21.

Those attending will get information on frauds in home repair, auto repair, telecommunications, identify theft, Medicare and other topics. Seniors are not the only ones who should be aware of potential scams; the free session is open to all.

It takes place from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Kenneth Aitken Senior Center, 17800 Redwood Road, Castro Valley. Call 520-583-8818 for reservation.

 

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Military recruits to be honored

CASTRO VALLEY — New military recruits will be honored at a ceremony June 2 at Castro Valley Center for the Performing Arts.

Congressman Eric Swalwell, D-Dublin, will help hand out certificates to the more than 50 recruits from the Bay Area.

A Soldier’s Medal also will be presented to Staff Sgt. Jason Ramsey of the Alameda Recruiting Center. Ramsey is credited with helping rescue a woman in June 2012 from a car that had gone into the Oakland estuary and was sinking.

The ceremony takes place 1 to 4 p.m. at 19501 Redwood Road. For more information, go to www.smr1.org.

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Uncovering local history

HAYWARD — Cal State East Bay graduate students will share some of what they’ve learned about the area’s colorful history on Thursday, May 16.

The presentations include:

– Michael Burton, “Port Costa: Sustaining an Unlikely Coastal California Boomtown, 1879-1909;”

– Edwin Contreras, “Mexican Land Grants: The Case of Don Castro’s Rancho San Lorenzo;”

– Olga Kachina, “How Global History Became Local: The Memory of the 1918 Izhevsk-Votkinsk Anti-Bolshevik Uprising as It Is Preserved in California;”

– Andrew Levin, “BART: The Backbone for Who?”

– Bria Reiniger, “Salt of the Hayward Shoreline: The Oliver Salt Company;”

– Carlotta Falzone Robinson, “Designing a Unified City: The Aesthetic Ideals of the 1915 Panama Pacific Exposition.”

The free talks begin at 5:30 p.m. at the Pancho Villa Event Center, 1026 B St. The event is a collaboration of the Hayward Area Historical Society, the History Department at Cal State East Bay and the Pancho Villa Event Center.

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Youth sought for Hayward Youth Commission

HAYWARD — The city is looking for students interested in serving on the Hayward Youth Commission.

Students must be ages 13 to 20 at the time of appointment and live in the city or within the boundaries of the Hayward Unified School District.

Applications are due by 5 p.m. May 16. Interviews will take place May 23.

The commission advises the mayor and City Council, Hayward Area Recreation and Park District and the school district about issues affecting young people. Members also work on projects such as organizing conferences.

Application forms may be found on the city’s website, www.hayward-ca.gov, under city government, boards-commissions-committees. They also can be requested from the city clerk’s office, 777 B St., fourth floor, telephone 510-583-4400.

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Hayward foundation recognizes school heroes

HAYWARD — The Hayward Education Foundation is honoring school heroes at a dinner on April 23. Every school in Hayward, public and private, was asked to nominate one person as its hero, someone who had gone above and beyond to enrich students’ lives.

If you’d like to attend the 5:30 p.m. dinner at Golden Peacock Restaurant, 24989 Santa Clara St., tickets are $25 at the door. Call 510-881-0890 or email Admin@HaywardEd.og

Elementary school:

BOWMAN Patricia (Trisha) Garcia Attendance Clerk
BURBANK Jason Brown Playworks Recess Coach
CHERRYLAND Jason Arenas Project EAT Coordinator
EDEN GARDENS Thu Tran Volunteer
ELDRIDGE Martie Canterberry Teacher
FAIRVIEW Tina Lagdamen Teacher
FAITH RINGGOLD Jill Strother Office Manager
GLASSBROOK Maria Radilla Volunteer
HARDER Jean Hakanson Attendance Clerk
LONGWOOD Kim Turner Parent Volunteer
PALMA CEIA Dorothy Stredic Volunteer
PARK Linda Lanthier Teacher
RUUS Felecia Chapman Office Manager
SOUTHGATE Maggie Albarran Teacher
STONEBRAE Frankie Smith Noon Supervisor
STROBRIDGE Diana Ingalls Volunteer
TREEVIEW/
BIDWELL Linda Brune Breakfast & Noon Supervisor & Volunteer
TYRRELL Adam Boettcher Teacher

Middle School:
BRET HARTE Jorge Zarate Senior Custodian
M.L. KING JR Austin Bates MLKing Graduate/Mentor
OCHOA Russelle Obee Campus Supervisor
WINTON Erik Waite Teacher
High School:
BRENKWITZ Shan Chu Teacher
HAYWARD Rev. Dr. Arlene Nehring Community Volunteer
TENNYSON Melissa Morris Nutrition Educator
MOREAU CATHOLIC Petar Zegura Teacher
IMPACT ACADEMY Patricia Ramirez Volunteer

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More cleanups scheduled

Three cleanups are planned for the unincorporated area.

On Saturday, volunteers will gather at Mervin Morris Park, Nielsen and Grant avenues in San Lorenzo, to pick up trash for Earth Day. The event starts at 8:30 a.m., ending with a free barbecue lunch at the park. Preregistration is requested at 510-276-4554. The event is hosted by Supervisor Wilma Chan and the San Lorenzo Village Homeowners Association.

On April 27, Supervisor Nate Miley and Friends of San Lorenzo Creek will join Castro Valley Sanitary District’s Earth Day Cleanup of the Castro Valley BART parking lot and Castro Valley Creek. There will be two staging areas: the CVS parking lot area, 3667 Castro Valley Blvd.; and Miley’s district office, 20993 Redwood Road.

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. To sign up, go to www.cvsan.org or call 510-537-0757. For questions about parking, contact Anna Gee at 510-537-0757.

And on May 4, there will be a cleanup of the San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Those joining in are asked to take rakes, gloves and gardening equipment and meet at the corner of College and Usher streets. The cleanup is hosted by the Hayward Area Historical Society and the San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery Friends.

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Loop meeting Thursday

In case you missed it, Hayward staff members will be holding a meeting Thursday to talk about the loop and the rest of the Route 238 Corridor Improvement project.

It seems everybody has an opinion on the new one-way traffic loop through downtown Hayward that started March 16. My perspective? It seems to work if you’re in the correct lane to get to where you want to go. I’m hoping that with final paving, striping and signs, it will be more clearer.

I have been testing out the loop from different approaches for a week. It is still confusing as to which lane you need to be in, but I think we’ll figure that out. I do hope that Hayward PD has radar guns out on Foothill Boulevard headed north; the tickets from speeders could generate quite a bit of income for the city.

Drivers headed east on A Street seem to be confused when they hit the one-way segment. Some are looping back down B Street and then right to A Street west; others seem to have no idea where to go. I’m pretty sure I would be confused, if not downright lost, if I were not from Hayward and was trying to head east on A Street.

Now, what does this mean to downtown merchants? I’m sure they will express their opinions at Thursday’s meeting, which starts at 9 a.m. in Room 1C at City Hall, 777 B St. Can’t make the meeting? The city’s loop website: haywardloop.org.

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Now that would have been cool

HAYWARD — A rumor was circulating that the city planned to use a helicopter to put the last two signal bridges in place along Foothill Boulevard.

Not so, says Morad Fakhrai, Hayward’s director of public works, engineering and transportation.

He said someone did actually check to see if using a helicopter would make sense. Turns out the signal bridges would be too heavy for a helicopter to lift.

Instead, two cranes will be used to install the bridges sometime this week. The work will be done late at night.

Meanwhile, drivers and pedestrians are adjusting to the new one-way traffic loop. Hayward police were stationed at major intersections Monday morning with lights flashing on their cruisers, mostly to try to get motorists to pay attention. Old habits die hard.

A lot more motorists were using B Street on Monday. There didn’t seem to be as many wrong-way drivers on the loop.

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Castro Valley Class of 1963 plans reunion

CASTRO VALLEY — The Class of 1963 graduated at the beginning of what would become the turbulent 1960s. Those high school seniors saw a lot of changes over the next decade, and listened to a lot of great music.

Fifty years later, Castro Valley High School 1963 grads are planning a reunion the weekend of Sept. 21. Tentative plans include a casual get-together Friday evening, a Saturday barbecue/picnic and a Saturday evening main event.

Reunion organizers are compiling a contact list and ask that all 1963 Spartan classmates email Tara O’Leary at olearytara@mac.com.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering, it appears that Castro Valley High students were called the Spartans before the school merged with Canyon High School and Canyon became a middle school.

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Food for thought

CASTRO VALLEY — While many think of St. Patrick’s Day as a time for wearing of the green, the community is invited to be green in eating habits at the same time.

A free screening of the documentary “Forks Over Knives” is planned for this coming Sunday, March 17, at the Castro Valley Library.

The film will focus on how a low-fat, plant-based diet can reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and autoimmune diseases while helping the planet.

Snacks will be provided, and a short discussion will follow the film, sponsored by Starr King Unitarian Universalist Church.

The event begins at 1:30 p.m. at the library, 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley.