0

Election season is already here

Hi. Sorry to be away for so long. Illness plus technical difficulties were not a good combination.

A few updates: Two candidates in the Hayward mayor’s race — Mark Salinas and Francisco Zermeno — both have been busy, hosting community events, raising money, attending just about every local gathering. I haven’t seen as much from Barbara Halliday, but that doesn’t mean she’s not connecting with voters; she doesn’t seem to use social media as much as the other two. All three have a lot of connections in the community.

I have been hearing rumors that two others will enter the race to replace longtime Mayor Michael Sweeney, who has announced his retirement at the end of June. But no names have been attached.

One guy did stop  by the Daily Review office and said he was running for mayor. I won’t give his name, because he didn’t speak to me; I only overheard him as he was flirting with our office manager. We do get some interesting characters wandering in off Foothill.

Salinas’ council seat will be up for grabs. Councilman Marvin Peixoto has announced he plans to run for re-election.

Meanwhile, Hayward Unified Trustee William McGee has set up a website for his re-election and to keep the community informed. His and Trustee Lisa Brunner’s terms expire next year; Brunner has not announced whether she will seek re-election.

The city of Hayward also is looking at a ballot measure to pay for a new main library and two fire stations, and possibly more upgrades and services. A series of meetings and outreach are planned, beginning next month.

The Hayward school district is talking about another bond measure to replace more of the district’s aging schools, but no date has been set.

Alameda County is looking at asking voters to extend Measure A, a half-cent sales tax set to expire in 2019. It helps fund medical services to the county’s low-income residents, but some have complained that too much of the money currently goes to Highland Hospital or is at the discretion of the county Board of Supervisors and subject to political maneuverings. Without it, services will be drastically cut, advocates say. But it was approved in much better economic times, 2004.

Oh, and remember Measure B-1, the proposal that would double the county sales tax for transportation from a half-cent to a full cent that was narrowly defeated in 2012? It will be back on the ballot in November, though with a 30-year time limit (the previous proposal had no time limit).

These are just a few local measures being considered; statewide ones could also be on the ballot. With all the competing interests asking voters to open their wallets, there is concern it will be overwhelming and voters will just say no to all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Hayward limits free food hand-outs downtown

HAYWARD — The City Council on Tuesday put restrictions on free outdoor feedings downtown, limiting them to once a month at city parks.

The rules cover Portuguese Park and other city-owned properties. Portuguese Park has been the site of two or more food handouts daily to 50 to 100 people, which neighbors say has resulted in thefts, vandalism and trash in the area, plus people relieving themselves in the park and the area.

At the Daily Review office on Foothill a few blocks away, we’ve seen some of the problems neighbors describe, though to a lesser extent. We have had people defecating near a dumpster behind our office. We’ve come to work in the morning walking past people sleeping in corners. We’ve had to call the police because of mentally unstable people going off and trying to smash things as they stagger along Foothill, where traffic zips by at 40 to 50 mph. We’ve been accosted and intimidated in the municipal parking lot behind our office.

The problems in downtown Hayward are real. These are problems the city has been grappling with for years, yet they only seems to intensify.

City staff members and council members are quick to point out that the new restrictions aren’t intended to address homelessness, or hunger, but to make downtown safer and to regulate what occurs on city property.

What do you suggest be done? Everyone seems to be sympathetic and compassionate, but long-term solutions remain elusive. I’d love to hear what others think.

 

0

Fashion show to help others

HAYWARD — Nina’s Bode, a boutique on B Street downtown, is hosting a fashion show Saturday, Oct. 19, to raise funds for Eden I&R (2-1-1).

Eden I&R is a nonprofit agency that connects people with services available to them. It’s the only centralized source for health, housing, and human services information exists anywhere else in Alameda County.

According to its website, it serves thousands of at-risk individuals, including youth, non-English speakers, the economically disadvantaged, people living with HIV/AIDS, domestic violence survivors, the elderly, disabled, the homeless, and human service agencies seeking services or housing for their clients.

The fundraiser, entitled “The Gift of Giving,” begins at Nina’s Bode, 1037 B St., with appetizers at 6 p.m., followed by the fashion show at 7 p.m. Tickets are $50 and may be purchased at the boutique, 510-537-3900.

0

A book with a powerful message

HAYWARD — In April, 30 volunteers handed out free copies of the book “The Language of Flowers” in Hayward to people who don’t normally read as part of World Book Night. On Saturday, Aug. 17, the book’s author will give a free talk at Hayward City Hall.

“Language of Flowers” by Vanessa Diffenbaugh is about Victoria, 18, who has aged out of the foster care system. She sleeps in a San Francisco park, where she plants a garden. The discovery of her garden leads to discoveries of herself.

In addition to sharing the book, Hayward Library’s Book-to-Action program focused on raising awareness about foster youth. The program connects reading a book with a civic engagement project.

Volunteers let the community know about Bay Area and national organizations that help foster youth, including The Camellia Network (co-founded by Diffenbaugh), Hayward-based Bay Area Youth Centers, Beyond Emancipation, First Place for Youth, Alameda County Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children (CASA), and Adopt a Special Kid, according to a release.
.
Representatives of those groups will be at Diffenbaugh’s talk, which begins at 2 p.m. in Hayward Council Chambers, 777 B St.

Those interested in becoming a World Book Night book giver next year can sign up for the WBN mailing list at http://www.worldbooknight.org/ .

The Aug. 17 event is sponsored by the Hayward Public Library, the Friends of the Hayward Library, and the Book Shop on B Street. For more information, call 510-881-7700, email sally.thomas@hayward-ca.gov or visit http://library.hayward-ca.gov

2

Business comings, goings

HAYWARD — Famous Dave’s is close to opening at Southland Mall. A sign in front says it’s opening July 22. There’s also a sign indicating the barbecue chain is hiring.

Famous Dave’s is moving into the old Marie Callendar’s building facing Winton Avenue that has been vacant for some time. The barbecue restaurant was serving up food at the recent downtown street fair.

And in downtown Hayward on Foothill Boulevard between A and B streets, a Filipino restaurant is opening at the former crepes restaurant. I haven’t seen a sign showing when it will open.

The consignment shop at A and Foothill is closing. It’s started a going out of business sale. Meanwhile, a few doors down, Dollar Tree has been open for awhile.

The Zumba place that was on Foothill in the same block as the consignment shop and Dollar Tree has moved to B Street next to Eden Jewelry, near Mission Boulevard.

Avocado Freddy’s is scheduled to reopen July 26. It’s on Main Street near the Jackson-Mission-Foothill intersection (the building was formerly a Kentucky Fried Chicken outlet) and close to Bret Harte Middle School and St. Regis Retirement Center Avocado Freddy’s is offering some specials with its reopening; check its website for details.

If you hear of other places opening (and yes, closing, sadly), please share. Thanks!

0

Senior Scam Stopper planned for June 21

CASTRO VALLEY -- Seniors are often targeted in scams. To help them become more aware of current frauds, Assemblyman Bill Quirk and the Contractors State License Board are holding a free Senior Scam Stopper event Friday, June 21.

Those attending will get information on frauds in home repair, auto repair, telecommunications, identify theft, Medicare and other topics. Seniors are not the only ones who should be aware of potential scams; the free session is open to all.

It takes place from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Kenneth Aitken Senior Center, 17800 Redwood Road, Castro Valley. Call 520-583-8818 for reservation.

 

0

Uncovering local history

HAYWARD — Cal State East Bay graduate students will share some of what they’ve learned about the area’s colorful history on Thursday, May 16.

The presentations include:

– Michael Burton, “Port Costa: Sustaining an Unlikely Coastal California Boomtown, 1879-1909;”

– Edwin Contreras, “Mexican Land Grants: The Case of Don Castro’s Rancho San Lorenzo;”

– Olga Kachina, “How Global History Became Local: The Memory of the 1918 Izhevsk-Votkinsk Anti-Bolshevik Uprising as It Is Preserved in California;”

– Andrew Levin, “BART: The Backbone for Who?”

– Bria Reiniger, “Salt of the Hayward Shoreline: The Oliver Salt Company;”

– Carlotta Falzone Robinson, “Designing a Unified City: The Aesthetic Ideals of the 1915 Panama Pacific Exposition.”

The free talks begin at 5:30 p.m. at the Pancho Villa Event Center, 1026 B St. The event is a collaboration of the Hayward Area Historical Society, the History Department at Cal State East Bay and the Pancho Villa Event Center.

0

Art exhibit in South Hayward

HAYWARD — Sorry this is last-minute, but there’s a free art exhibit at Westminster Hills Outreach Center on Friday, May 3. It runs until 9 p.m.

The exhibit, called PLAY, is composed of repurposed and refreshed children’s toys and games, designed to reminder viewers of their own playful days.

There will be a reception for the artists from 5 to 9 p.m. at the center, 27287 Patrick Ave.

The exhibit is free, but items from the Homeless Angels’ on-site art and gift store will be available for purchase. Prices range from $5 to $25. The Homeless Angels project works to eliminate obstacles to self-sufficiency.

For more information, go to www.southhaywardparish.org/hcan.