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Volunteers sought for Hayward citywide cleanup

HAYWARD — Volunteers are needed for a citywide cleanup on April 20.

Those taking part will meet at Weekes Park at 8 a.m. and then spread out over the city to pick up trash. All cleanup supplies will be provided.

At the end of the event, all volunteers will be treated to a barbecue lunch and thank-you gift.
Last year, 200 signed up, and the city is hoping to attract at least that many. To register, go to www.surveymonkey.com/s/cleanupdaysform.

For more details, call Hayward maintenance department at 510-583-4343 or email cleanupday@hayward-ca.gov.

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Mountain climber to give talk in Castro Valley

CASTRO VALLEY — A Castro Valley High graduate who became a mountaineer will share some of his adventures March 15.

Marty Schmidt, who now lives in New Zealand, is a certified mountain climber and guide. He has ascended some of hte world’s highest peaks without bottled oxygen.

He will be showing some photographs and talk about his climbs on Mount Everest, Makalu, Gasherbrum 1 and 2, and other peaks.

Schmidt’s presentation begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Castro Valley Center for the Arts, 19501 Redwood Road.

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Big flea market planned in Castro Valley

CASTRO VALLEY — More than 55 vendors will be selling items at a flea market March 2 at the Kenneth C. Aitken Senior and Community Center.

There also will be a snack bar and a bake sale with homemade treats at the flea market, which runs 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 17800 Redwood Road.

The event is being hosted by the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District. For more details, call 510-881-6738.

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Emergency Shelter Program wins van

Emergency Shelter Program of Hayward has a new van from AutoWest Toyota in Hayward, thanks to Toyota’s Cars for Good program.

Toyota’s initiative hands out 100 cars to 100 nonprofit agencies over the course of 100 days.

Emergency Shelter Program provides shelter and other services to women and children who are survivors of domestic violence, human trafficking and homelessness. The van will be used to transport its clients to emergency shelter, medical and social service appointments, and legal proceedings.

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Dogs in the park

We’re hearing a lot from folks regarding dogs running off-leash in Hayward Area and Recreation District Park parks, specifically East Avenue Park in Fairview. Currently, dogs must be on leash at all HARD parks and facilities except in designated dog parks, but the district board is looking at the rules after an East Avenue resident called them too strict.

http://www.insidebayarea.com/breaking-news/ci_22388687/hayward-park-district-look-at-off-leash-dog

The callers/emailers have been split between those who favor looser rules and those who have had bad experiences with dogs at East Avenue Park. And everyone seems to have strong opinions.

We don’t envy HARD directors or staff as they wrestle with the issue, which was brought up during public comments at Monday’s board meeting. The controversy over the size of the Duck Pond in the master plan for San Lorenzo Community Park, aka the Duck Pond, which drew large crowds to HARD board meetings, may end up seeming relatively minor.

Related: Because of an editing error, some printed versions of the off-leash dog story in the Daily Review incorrectly said that Alameda County and Hayward allow dogs to be off-leash in public spaces. Not true. Both the city and the county prohibit dogs off-leash except in designated dog parks.

Our apologies to HARD staff members, who already are dealing with a headache.

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Trees along Foothill

Rumors that trees would not be planted along Foothill Boulevard are false.

The rumors apparently started when work crews filled up the tree wells with asphalt. Not to worry – the asphalt will be dug out and trees will go in later. The trees are part of the landscaping along Foothill, which also has new sidewalks and streetlights as part of the Route 238 Corridor Improvement Project.

The asphalt is temporary, says Kevin Briggs, Hayward’s project manager for the road construction. “We put the asphalt in for the holiday season to clean things up and make the area more pedestrian friendly,” he says.

And some of the irrigation system still needs to be installed before the trees are planted, Briggs says.

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Annual Hayward Area Historical Society awards on Friday

The Selmeczki family outside their newly opened hardware store on Castro Valley Boulevard in 1926. From left, dad Pete, son Ernie, mom Mary and son Frank.

The Hayward Area Historical Society will hold its 13th annual history awards ceremony on Friday, and tickets are still available. We had a story on Pete’s Hardware in Castro Valley, which is being honored as a historic business.

This year’s other winners are Randy Wittorp for his work to restore his Tudor home on Prospect Hill in Hayward, the Hayward Municipal Band for years of summer concerts and other events, Hayward High teacher Peggy Hearne for her history-rich curriculum, Robert and Erica Campisi for their work to improve Cherryland and Meek Park, and Supervisor Nate Miley for his leadership in preservation efforts at the San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery.

Find more information on all the winners in the HAHS press release after the jump. Continue Reading

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Live barn owl webcam at Sulphur Creek Nature Center

Two barn owls, that's whooo!

UPDATE 4/9: Got this from Wendy on Thursday, haven’t had a chance to blog. 

“Just a quick up date on the Owl Cam at Sulphur Creek. Five eggs have hatched to date and we expect the 6th egg to hatch on Good Friday, April 6th.  All the babies seem to be doing well.   The male had been bringing in food at night and mom has been patiently feeding the little babies (owlets) little pieces of rodent that the dad brought in.   The owl cam has been a huge success.   Since put onto the web three weeks ago, we now have had over 35,000 hits by 4,000 viewers from 25 countries.  Images of the babies show that the owlet the first hatched is substantially bigger than his siblings, but all are doing well.”

Feel like snooping on some feathered friends? Sulphur Creek Nature Center set up a camera to record what’s going on with a pair of wild, nesting barn owls and their six eggs. They expect them to hatch any day, and you can take a real-time peek at what’s going on right now on the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District website.

The small camera was placed in a nesting box that is used every year, said Wendy Winsted, an coordinator at the center. It is equipped with infrared light, so activity in the box can be watched 24 hours a day.

Winsted said the first egg is expected to hatch between now and Monday, and the others will follow at two-day intervals.

That’s different than for, say, ducks, because owls lay an egg and immediately start incubating it, Winsted said. Ducks also lay an egg every two days or so but wait until they’re all done before they incubate the lot of ‘em. So they all hatch at once.

With owls, Winsted said, the first egg out will contain an owl with considerable advantages over its peers. It will always be the one that’s a bit bigger.

Winsted is very excited about the owl-cam, and said they tried something similar  years ago with a system wired to a VCR. But going public with it brings an all new element.

“This is something we’ve wanted to do for a long time,” Winsted said, adding that technological assistance was provided by the Hayward Area Recreation and Park Department, funding from the Castro Valley Rotary Club.

More info on press release after the jump.

Continue Reading