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Calendar for week of Feb. 28

 Here’s this week’s calendar. Just about to head to San Leandro to see what they say about options for a medical marijuana ordinance. Tomorrow, the Hayward City Council is poised to take steps to save redevelopment assets from a possible state take. And Wednesday’s Sustainability Committee meeting could be a big one, as they will be looking at the draft Residential Energy Conservation Ordinance. They moved that meeting into the main Council Chambers instead of the work session room, in case people turn out. Continue Reading

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Mission Blvd. mission continues, despite potential funding loss

The City Council held a Tuesday night work session on the Mission Boulevard Specific Plan. That’s the one that covers Mission from Harder Road to the northern city limit, with the exception of the downtown area between Jackson and A streets. It’s 640 parcels, 200 acres, about 2 miles long.

As Mayor Mike Sweeney pointed out, it’s important to keep in mind that redevelopment funds are crucial to see this become a reality, and the future of those funds is uncertain because Gov. Brown has stated he wants to dissolve redevelopment agencies and use the funds elsewhere.

“If the governor is successful and redevelopment is no longer available, that takes several tools out of the tool box for this area,” Sweeney said. “The remaining tools would have to be used very effectively.”

Read about Tuesday’s discussion after the jump, click on images for a larger view. Continue Reading

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Hayward’s latest green proposal would affect homeowners

"RECO lawww!"

"RECO lawww!"

Hayward’s mulling a Residential Energy Conservation Ordinance, or RECO, and we had a story on it in today’s paper.

City officials really want to hear from the public on this. At the last Sustainability Committee meeting, some citizens expressed that they didn’t think the city was doing a good enough job of letting people know about it. There was talk of possibly including a notice in every water bill, but that would be fairly cost prohibitive.

 San Francisco and Berkeley passed such ordinances back in the 1980s.

Alice LaPierre, city of Berkeley building science specialist, said many residents “are on board with the idea of efficiency” and that the intent of the ordinance is to “protect residents from rising energy costs.”

“They will see a payoff immediately, and they’ll notice they have a more comfortable home,” she said.

Hayward residents at the last meeting and Realtors alike said they’re all for energy saving measures that will help the environment. But the real estate people I spoke with said it should be done in a more voluntary manner, instead of putting prohibitive requirements on homeowners or parties involved in a real estate transaction. Continue Reading