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Seymour’s play must equal ability to lead

By Jerry McDonald - NFL Writer
Saturday, May 28th, 2011 at 12:45 pm in Oakland Raiders.

Richard Seymour was by all accounts the dominant figure during the passing camp he helped organize this week.

He urged his teammates with an e-mail talking about all the hard work it would take for the Raiders to be winners this year. In lieu of a coach, Seymour spoke to the team as the authoritative figure in the absence of Hue Jackson or the coaching staff. His camp, with help from Competitive Edge Sports in the Atlanta area, appeared to match or exceed anything done by any other team during the lockout.

Seymour has been the big man in the Raiders’ locker room since he arrived by trade from the New England Patriots. Coaches respect him, young players look up to him. He has a championship pedigree and an aura to match.

When it comes to presence and professionalism off the field, the Raiders could hardly ask for more.

On the field, however the Raiders will need more than they’ve gotten in the 29 games Seymour has been a Raider.

Given his age (he’ll be 32 in October) and the amount of tread on the tires from 11 seasons as a defensive lineman, the Raiders wisely committed to only two years on Seymour’s contract extension. The fact that he accepted it demonstrates Seymour understands he’s nearing the end of the line.

What the Raiders need is what they got from Rod Woodson _ at least one last glorious season or two before heading off into retirement and then a possible induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The voting for the HOF is always trick but Seymour’s three Super Bowl rings, six Pro Bowls and reputation could serve him well. Finishing by helping lead the Raiders back into the post season would add to his legacy.

The question is whether Seymour is up to it. There have been times when Seymour has given the Raiders their most dominant defensive line play since the prime of Howie Long, a player similar in terms of strength and versatility.

But there have also been stretches where Seymour has blended in with a defense that has had way too many games of mediocrity or worse.

The season-opener in 2009 against San Diego was Seymour at his best, blowing up offensive linemen and blocking schemes, registering two sacks and being a factor on almost every play. Later in the season, it was the same thing in a win over Philadelphia. He had two sacks against Donovan McNabb that day _ and those four sacks represented his entire season total.

Sacks are only a part of his game, but the Raiders were weak against the run all season despite the ripple effect Seymour’s presence should bring.

Last season, moved inside to the three technique, Seymour had the best stretch of play by a defensive lineman since the Raiders returned to Oakland in 1995, particularly during a three-game win streak that put Oakland at 5-4 going into its bye week. At the time I wrote Seymour was a legitimate defensive player of the year candidate.

And then . . .

As much as I enjoyed Seymour’s decking of Ben Roethlisberger from the perspective of a father of a teenaged daughter, it happened at a time when the Raiders were getting pushed around in a 35-3 loss to the Steelers. In his last five games, Seymour never had more than three tackles in a game and exactly one sack. He missed the last two games with a hamstring injury.

When players voted for the winner of the Eric Turner award as the defensive MVP, the winner wasn’t Seymour, but fellow defensive tackle Tommy Kelly.

Much of Kelly’s success can probably be attributed to the man he calls “Big Rich.” Seymour helped prod Kelly into getting in better shape and by example demonstrated what it was like to be a pro. It would be hard to overstate his effect on young linemen such as Matt Shaughnessy and Lamarr Houston.

But make no mistake, the Raiders didn’t extend Seymour two years and $28.5 million in guaranteed money to be a coach on the field. They need those last two years to be Seymour at his dominant best as often as possible as they attempt to eliminate the periods of defensive inconsistency which have plagued them since 2003.

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  • http://www.jerryisatwit.com MistaBrown

    Good point, however there is nothing to report during the lockout.
    _____

    RAIDERMAN99 Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 9:35 am

    With the frequency Jerry posts, it’s possible he’s boycotting the blog.

  • RaiderRockstar

    Jerry made no indication that his impact on the field wasn’t much

    ***

    TJ, he didn’t?

    what does all this stuff mean then?

    <

    On the field, however the Raiders will need more than they’ve gotten in the 29 games Seymour has been a Raider.

    Given his age (he’ll be 32 in October) and the amount of tread on the tires from 11 seasons as a defensive lineman, the Raiders wisely committed to only two years on Seymour’s contract extension. The fact that he accepted it demonstrates Seymour understands he’s nearing the end of the line.

    there have been stretches where Seymour has blended in with a defense that has had way too many games of mediocrity or worse.

    the Raiders were weak against the run all season despite the ripple effect Seymour’s presence should bring.

    In his last five games, Seymour never had more than three tackles in a game and exactly one sack. He missed the last two games with a hamstring injury.

    When players voted for the winner of the Eric Turner award as the defensive MVP, the winner wasn’t Seymour, but fellow defensive tackle Tommy Kelly.

  • priesttj

    RRs do you watch the games or do you need Jerry to tell you what happened? are you really that clueless?

  • priesttj

    Jerry is a writer man, that is all he is he is not some knowledgable football man. I give him full credit for disiminating the info and doing his best to tell the story. But Jerry’s football acumen is terrible………I’m sorry but it is. He doesn’t know anything more than what he is told. He’s a good football fan just like the rest of you and that is all he is.

  • guest123

    I think it’s fair to question the value we got for the #17 pick in this years draft. Nick Solder has a good chance to make an impact for a decade or so. Or he may be a wasted first rounder. The Raiders track history with first rounders has been lousy, and the cost to sign the top 10 picks has been a burden.

    I like to look at the rental of Seymour as the missing cog that allowed some others like Tommy Kelly to finally blossom and reach their potential. Clearly, Seymour is on the downside of his career, but if he can lead this team through effort and example, it sets up as a worthwhile first round pick. It was certainly no worse than failed first round picks we have had in the past.

  • guest123

    He’s a good football fan just like the rest of you and that is all he is.

    *********

    Except for the fact that Jerry vehemently declines that he’s a fan at all.

  • RAIDERMAN99

    C’mon, everyone knows JaMoron being the biggest bust in NFL history was Cable/Tollner/Whackitt/Scabs’ fault.

    Whatever happened to Al’s lawsuit against JaMoron ? Wasn’t Al trying to recover something like 10 million dollars ?

    I’d love to read the briefs on that one. Are the filings public record ?

  • priesttj

    Guest as much as enjoy watching Seymour play his leadership on this team far exceeds his play on the field. It’s hard to quantify leadership because you’d have to see what things would be like without him but his affect on LHouston and TK as well as Des Bryant seems very evident to me. And maybe some others now that doesn’t say he hasn’t played well because he has. Regardless to what Jerry says. He forces HB’s to bounce plays often and his push up the middle is significant. It doesn’t mena he’ll make the play but he forces things so others CAN make plays. We were tied for sacks in the league I think and some of that is due to Seymour forcing doubles. TK led DT’s in sacks and that is directly attributable to Seymmour.

  • http://www.jerryisatwit.com MistaBrown

    tj has there ever been a bigger “whif” than your bromance luv affair with JaMeatball?

    Im only asking because you are an “authority” on “whiffing”.

  • Silverandblack666

    I think Seymour’s impact is huge, especially on a team that changes coaches every two years. I think you need a leader like that who can set the example of hard work good study habits and a will to win so the rookies see what it takes to be successful.

  • edward teach

    Rockstar,

    There’s a whole lot more going on on the field than stats indicate, and I’m surprised you’re falling back on Jerry’s comments regarding Seymour.

    Tommy Kelly was the defensive MVP last year. He happens to play right next to Richard Seymour. That is not a coincidence, especially when you look at TK’s play with Terdell Sands et al next to him in previous years. It’s not a fluke that TK’s results improved when Seymour was moved from DE to DT. Our opponents are going to try and take somebody out of the game with their blocking schemes, and I’m pretty sure they’re going to choose Seymour over Kelly.

    Jerry is paid to make statements like that in order to get people to comment, so he can probably be excused for the lack of presenting the complete picture. You should know better.

    As far as your comments about the two db’s, they were both taken before we picked. We did address the WR position, with a guy that by all accounts has the skillset and college production to come in and contribute. Jon Baldwin is a noted headcase, and I think we can say that the last few Raider drafts have evidenced a lack of interest in that type of player.

    Also, the two db’s, the d-lineman and the WR you mention would have come at the expense of addressing an offensive line that has needed improvement for quite some time now and that is alarmingly high on aging and free agent players. I’m not even counting your earlier post where you said that if Kaepernick was available in the second round we should have taken him.

    There are only so many picks.

  • Silverandblack666

    Fat warren Sapp was brought in here to do exactly what Seymour is doing, but couldn’t do it. Like a politician fat lazy Sapp was good at talking but when it came time to back it up on the field he failed. I think Sapp helped develop the collect a check mentality a lot of the players had at the time.

  • guest123

    Didn’t Sapp lose something like 30 lbs coming into his last season with the Raiders? Some fluff pieces before that season had Sapp saying he was fit and ready. That didn’t end well though.

  • guest123

    priesttj:

    I am A-OK with having Seymour as our 2011 first rounder. We already got 2 good years in the books out of him and probably 2 more. Go and look at the percentage of first round picks that have highly productive 4 year career and I bet it’s not that great of a list.

  • priesttj

    Sapp wasn’t half the player Seymour has been, and no where near the leader. I agree 100% about the paycheck mentality comment he was here for a retirement fund.

    In short Seymour has been golden….I would do that trade 100 x’s out of 100. If he plays at or near what he did early last year b4 he was hurt this team will be hard to beat with that O we have.

    I can’t believe you called the passing game trash…… we haven’t been able to pass like that in 7 years and it promises to be much improved this year.

    I’m not knocking Jerry as a blogger as far as that is concerned he’s aces but if you’re relying on him for football knowledge I would say just watch the game and draw your own conclusion you’d do just as well. He can give you stats and facts but you have to know the game a little.

  • guest123

    I agree about the Seymour trade, and it was a pretty gutsy move, having picked in the top 10 three straight years to deal a #1. If it was another top 10 pick to NEP, the press would have had a field day, laughing and clowning Al Davis for the trade. Now, it looks like it was a fair deal. If we were able to trade a future #1 for an established vet at a position of need, I’d go all in again.

  • priesttj

    I agree Guest but beyond that I think his leadership has been pivotal, and i can’t stress that enough it’s HUGE. Guys this team was a hot mess and Mr Davis knew it he had to do something to change the attitude he paid Nnamdi a ton of money trying to do that Nnamdi is not a leader so he had to make that trade. Why do you think he’s questioning how much he needs Nnamdi? Have you ever seen him question how much a player was getting??? huh? it’s because Nnamdi doesn’t lead………………..period

  • guest123

    I think Nnamdi isn’t in a position of leadership. He’s basically like a starting pitcher in baseball. The game for him is his solo assignment and he keeps his guy locked down. What he does on the field doesn’t translate to the other guys the way it does with Seymour. However if they had another good lockdown CB on the other side, it would. I’d not call out Nnamdi for not being a leader, though. What seriously do you want him to do? He’s been a leader both on and off the field. There’s only so much he can do.

    Seymour is someone that helps the entire unit because he is clever and knows where he must play and helps others align themselves. The exposure he brings to some of the younger guys is invaluable and helps them become true vets. Without that veteran leader, this team would have continued to be a hot mess. Some of the guys jettisoned probably could have saved their Raider career if they had only had a talent level of a Seymour to play behind.

  • Just Fire Baby

    Can’t wait to see Richard play the Pats this year.

  • priesttj

    Guest123 I agree to a certain extent, but what nnamdi lacks you see in spades with Mike Mitchell his enthusiasm his aggressiveness. WhennRod Woodson was here he brought supreme leadership in that secondary. When have you EVER seen Nnamdi get in another players face? He is the preeminant corner in this league and he has never chastised a teammate for screwing up. If he doesn’t have that right WHO DOES???? The owner didn’t give him ?????$$$mill just to shut down his man. He gave it to him because the rest of the team LOOKED UP to him. He helped the guys inn the secondary to watch film but on the field…..nada!!

    I watch Seymour literally point at guys at guys LB’s and tell them play your assignment. Get the job done!! I see more leadership from MM34 than I ever did from Nnamdi and Nnam is my guy!!

    If you watch Camp he does the same thing when he’s on the field he gets guys lined up and if they don’t know he personalizes the convo. He doesn’t show them up but he gets them straight. Camp’s professionalism and they way he goes about his job was SORELY needed. He’s not a rah rah guy but in no uncertain terms he’s leading. And I for one couldn’t be happier, him telling DHB “you can do it” makes a world of difference to that kid. Some don’t like Camp but IMO that guy is very underrated. I’ve watched several games over and over again and his contrinutin last year largely goes unnoticed.

  • priesttj

    JFB is there any question why Seymour is doing what he’s doing? in no underatin terms he wants to BURY the Pat’s……….period

  • priesttj

    uncertain* i can believe that word turned out like that……haha!

  • raiderfankirk

    Mr and kk are raider hating lovers sucking every last drop of each others azz pie out and gargling with it.

  • RaiderDebo

    RaiderRockstar Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 9:40 am
    Had to suffer through it here with Cable/Tollner/Whackitt/Scabs. Glad Al finally woke up, but losing your #1 overall pick was a big price to pay. Poor JR.

    ***

    Paul Hackett = coach since 1970
    Ted Tollner = coach since 1968
    Tom Cable = coach since 1990
    Scabs = ???

    JaWalrus = 3 years in the NFL. 7 wins. biggest bust in NFL history

    Print That!

    @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

    Doing something for a long time doesn’t mean you’re any good at it. Whackitt sucked ass. I think I’ll go with Vinny’s opinion over yours.

    After leaving USC – as their head coach, Hackett served as the offensive coordinator for the New York Jets from 2001 to 2004. He was forced to resign from the team after the 2004 season.[8][9] During his time with the Jets, he was criticized by Vinny Testaverde for questionable play calling,[10] and by the media for an ultra-conservative “play it safe” offensive philosophy.[11] He was the Tampa Bay quarterbacks coach from 2005 to 2007. From 2008 to 2010, Hackett worked as the quarterback coach for the Oakland Raiders. Hackett is married and has two sons, David and Nathaniel.

  • priesttj

    Paul Hackett as a playcaller makes Jon Gruden look like Don Coryell but he is a one of the best QB coaches and widely respected as such.

  • RaiderDebo

    In late 2007 it was announced that he would serve as offensive assistant for the San Francisco 49ers in a late season attempt to revive the lacking offense and is expected to help Jim Hostler in the play calling.[4]

    In early 2008 Tollner was named quarterbacks coach/assistant to the head coach for the San Francisco 49ers to get a permanent role in the organization again.[5]

    On December 30, 2008, Tollner was dismissed from the 49ers along with running backs coach Tony Nathan and offensive coordinator Mike Martz.

    On February 4, 2009, Tollner was introduced as a part of the Oakland Raiders’ coaching staff as he was named the passing game coordinator of the team. When Hue Jackson was hired as the Raiders head coach he dismissed Toller and several others from their positions.
    @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

    The 2009 Oakland Raiders had the worst offensive coaching staff in the NFL by a longshot.

    Print that!!

  • priesttj

    Debo i know you’re going to get pissed at me, but Russell would still be a Raider if he was smart. He should’ve taken the paycut and put in the work. It would’ve engraciated him to the fans and put him in good standing with Mr Davis but he left him no excuse to keep him. You cannot blame everyone else for his poor attitude no matter what happened he was paid more than anyone on this team.

  • priesttj

    Russelll still could be a very good QB in this league but at some point he needs to grow up..

  • http://www.blogcdn.com/www.fanhouse.com/media/2008/04/desmond-howard-425-sm.jpg Bo Schembechler Jackson

    priesttj Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 11:31 am

    Paul Hackett as a playcaller makes Jon Gruden look like Don Coryell.

    :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

    And BHP as a scout makes Bobby Beathard look like Ron Wolf.

  • aig-raiders

    Yo JFB how did you shoot this past weekend?

  • guest123

    Russell is a cautionary tale of taking players with drug habits. Anyone with a drug habit can get so rolled up into a lifestyle where they forget they had any love for the game. They like being players and living the lifestyle of a playa without putting in the work.

    I think you see a guy like JCamp quietly lead this team. He’s not into the sideshow. He’s not a freak. He is the kind of guy that can look his teammate in the eye and not lose contact. Teammates who love the game don’t want to let down their teammates. They work hard to not make the other guy’s hard work go in vain. They see the effort of some to kill themselves daily, and it bothers them to lose because they werent prepared.

    I doubt JaMarcus ever felt that way. He was all about leaving the stadium ASAP after a loss and going back to the clubs and zizzurping again. He was a tragic pick, and no matter the talent level, a reminder that guys with drug pasts should be passed on in the draft.

    That’s why we don’t go and get Jimmy Smith and Ryan Mallett. Those are loaded dice.

  • guest123

    priesttj Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 11:38 am
    Russelll still could be a very good QB in this league but at some point he needs to grow up..

    ************

    It’s too late for Russell. At least he won the lottery and is set for life, (or should be). Guys that big only go downhill from there once the metabolism slows, and it’s hard to regain any of that youth and athletisism. Russell is done.

  • guest123

    The only problem I have with Hackett is that wasn’t his highlights of his career experience all centered around WCO’s?

  • RaiderRockstar

    he is not some knowledgable football man. I give him full credit for disiminating the info and doing his best to tell the story. But Jerry’s football acumen is terrible………I’m sorry but it is. He doesn’t know anything more than what he is told. He’s a good football fan just like the rest of you and that is all he is

    ***

    LOL @ TJ!

    why do you come here, then?

    to educate those of us who you don’t beleive “watch the games” because they have a different opinion than you?

  • priesttj

    Bo Bobby Beathard was one of the top GM’s ever he biult three title winners in Washington.

  • priesttj

    RRS your opinion is your own, That’s why I said watch the game and draw YOUR OWN conclusion. Jerry just has an opinion no better than yours.

    Hell! my opinion is mine alone if yours differs fine by me.

  • http://www.blogcdn.com/www.fanhouse.com/media/2008/04/desmond-howard-425-sm.jpg Bo Schembechler Jackson

    Actually he built four SB winners Priest. Do your research. 2 in Wash and 2 in Miami.

  • lefty12

    The Bust was too stupid to ever be a decent QB in the NFL,IMO.

  • RaiderRockstar

    I can’t believe you called the passing game trash…… we haven’t been able to pass like that in 7 years and it promises to be much improved this year.

    ***

    TJ,

    the Raiders had less than 200 passing yards per game. 18 TD’s to 16 INT’s. QB Rating under 78. Completion Percentage under 57. Our leading WR only caught 41 balls last year. QB’s were sacked 44 times

    excuse me for not wanting to polish a turd!

  • RaiderRockstar

    my opinion is mine alone if yours differs fine by me

    ***

    TJ,

    are you sure?

    It sure didn’t seem that way when you questionned whether or not I watch games, called me out for agreeing with Jerry and labeled me ignorant

    ah well. you’re a Democrat. I guess I should expect this sort of behavior

  • guest123

    Regarding the Turd passing game:

    That’s half-true and half-untrue.

    Jerry hit the nail on the head when he did a piece awhile back saying that JCamp had a stellar QB rating when the Raiders were able to put up a solid run game. But the QB rating plummets without the run.

    That tells me that Campbell’s limited success is a byproduct of a strong run game and not the other way around. We need to devise a plan to consistently win on the ground and let Campbell’s throwing complement the game plan. As much as I like Campbells leadership, he can’t take the team on his shoulders and win because of his QB play. His game is derivative of the running success.

    He’s no Peyton Manning, but a full season and consistent ground game could bring the passing stats up out of the polished turd status.

  • big oak boy

    big oak boy Says:
    May 31st, 2011 at 8:01 am

    so if we get T.O. and Steve smith for cheap would u guys be happy or would it be a lot of hate trade fragile chaz and a 5th 2013 pick and that should do and if not T.O. than Plaxico Burress but two vets would be a great thing one on the field at a time to preserve the legs and get all these old guys have left if we cant do something like this we can give up our sb prayers

    so no thoughts on this topic

  • RaiderRockstar

    JCamp had a stellar QB rating when the Raiders were able to put up a solid run game

    ***

    G123,

    I think thats true with ANY qb around the league. the running game is a QB’s best friend. a TE is his security blanket

    even with these things, the fact remains.

    passing game = stinky poo poo. stats don’t lie

  • Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

    Though Goodell sidestepped a couple of issues — the window needed for free agency, most notably — he was refreshingly candid about the damage done by the lockout

    “I think it’s clearly had an impact on our fans,” Goodell said. “You can see that in the various metrics that we have — whether it’s ratings or for traffic on NFL.com. We see that.

    “And that is a reflection on the uncertainty and frustration of our fans. And we all understand that. There are also financial consequences because of that, but clearly — if we’re not successful, that’s clearly to come.”

    Asked as a follow-up if the lockout had affected season-ticket sales, Goodell didn’t hesitate to point out that the respective clubs were all suffering when it came to locking down ticket sales.

    “It clearly has an impact [on season ticket sales],” Goodell said. “Fans want certainty. I don’t think you can ever underestimate — fans are still going through challenges, just in the general economy. And those challenges continue to impact on their decisions. And rightfully so.
    Owners Meetings/Labor News

    And that’s something they have to balance when they want to put down money for a season ticket or a club seat or whatever else. And so we have to keep that in mind. The ownership has been reminded of that during the past couple of days, and they don’t need reminding, because they’re on the front line.”

    Most interesting was Goodell’s response to a request for “specific data” about the impact of the lockout. He seemed absolutely amenable to providing the requested information, if only because it clearly showed the problems that the lockout is causing around the league, from the standpoint of keeping fans interested and generating revenue.

    “It’s a noticeable change,” Goodell said. “I think you guys are aware of it — our ratings were down in the draft for example. Roughly four million people — that’s a noticeable decrease … about a 10 percent decrease as I recall.”

    While no fans want to hear about the revenue that the league, its teams and the players are currently losing, it is a significant point of interest, because money that gets thrown out the window during a labor impasse directly correlates to the difficulty in finding an agreement down the road.

    “The longer it goes the more damage is done to the game and the more revenue’s down and that means less money that can be divided between the parties,” Goodell said.

    Owners were presented the full range of plans for opening weekend, from the first game on Thursday night at Lambeau Field to commemorations of the Sept. 11 attacks on the first full Sunday of games. Those dates are not in jeopardy yet, but the longer the impasse, the more in danger they would become, particularly with the league’s marketing partners, sponsors and advertisers who must commit dollars to those events well in advance.

    “We’re not at an Armageddon date,” Eric Grubman, executive vice president of business operations for the NFL, told the Associated Press. “We’re not staring that in the face this week.”

    But like any event looming on the horizon, the theoretically non-existent drop-dead date isn’t actually that far off. But, apparently, it won’t impact the way Goodell and the NFL head into the next season.

    STRIKE JERRY’S BLOG STARTING JUNE 1!

  • RaiderRockstar

    big oak boy : I’ll take Terrell Owens or Plaxico Burress (but not both)

    No thanks on Steve Smith or Santana Moss!

  • RaiderRockstar

    STRIKE JERRY’S BLOG STARTING JUNE 1!

    ***

    doc thompson,

    Jerry’s blog traffic is off the charts whether it’s St Pattys Day (March) or Turkey Day (November)

    he’s the writer’s version or Manning or Brady. all he does is produce on a week-to-week basis

    Jerry Mac for the Pulitzer Prize!

  • http://www.blogcdn.com/www.fanhouse.com/media/2008/04/desmond-howard-425-sm.jpg Bo Schembechler Jackson

    Ahh Scott, if you think it is reasonable to pigeonhole all Democrats (or all of any group), then you most certainly ARE ignorant.

    And thanks for introducing partisan politics into an otherwise football related discussion. Just shows what you stoop to when someone challenges your prejudices.

    Jesus does not approve, methinks.

  • Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

    STRIKE JERRY’S BLOG!

    Most interesting was Goodell’s response to a request for “specific data” about the impact of the lockout. He seemed absolutely amenable to providing the requested information, if only because it clearly showed the problems that the lockout is causing around the league, from the standpoint of keeping fans interested and generating revenue.

    “It’s a noticeable change,” Goodell said. “I think you guys are aware of it — our ratings were down in the draft for example. Roughly four million people — that’s a noticeable decrease … about a 10 percent decrease as I recall.”

  • Silverandblack666

    big oak boy

    I felt like we needed a veteran presence at the WR position because of the lack of quality leadership we have there “Sanjay”

    However it is my opinion that Al Davis thinks he has done enough at WR and is looking at improving other positions once the CBA is settled. So we will not see an experienced WR come in this year.

  • Silverandblack666

    Hunter S

    Have you seen this article?

    There are actually more season tickets being sold now than last year.

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/05/31/nfl-somehowahead-of-last-years-season-ticket-pace/