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Q & A with coach Rod Woodson

First-year Raiders cornerbacks coach Rod Woodson spoke with the media Monday on a wide range of topics, from his thoughts on some of the young players under his charge, to what it’s like coaching after a Hall of Fame career as a player, to what the Raiders defense is going to look like this season.

Woodson spoke for nine minutes after practice. Here is a transcription:

 

 

 

Q: What has it been like coaching so far?

A: “So far, so good. One-a-days is not tough on the coaches. It’s not really, really tough on the players yet. So far, so good. I can’t complain about it.”

 

Q: Has anything surprised you yet?

A: “Nope. No. Seven years removed, I’ve prepared myself for the worst. It hasn’t gotten to that point yet, but I’m ready for the long days when the season starts.”

 

Q: Are you a guy who isn’t very vocal when coaching?

A: “Well, I don’t think I need to scream and holler. Every coach has his own style. At the end of the day, the train is leaving. It’s going to leave with the guys or without the guys. My style is, if you want to get a paycheck, be on the train. I don’t need to tell you that. At the end of the day, if you’re not doing your job, you’re going to get cut. That’s the bottom line. That’s the reality of it. Throughout my career, my coaches never really yelled at me too much. I was a player that didn’t really respond to yelling. There’s some guys you need to push. There’s ways you find to push certain players. Other guys, you just tell them what to do, and they’ll do it. You have to find your way.”

 

Q: Which coaches influenced you during your 17-year playing career

A: “Gosh, all of them. Chuck Noll, Rod Rust, Tony Dungy, Dick Labeau, Dom Capers, Bill Cowher, Steve Mariucci, Johnnie Fox, he was a rookie coach when he was in Pittsburgh. All those guys who I coached under, I learned a little bit of something from them all.”

 

Q: What was it like watching the Pro Football Hall of Fame speeches this year? Enjoyable?

A: “Oh, yeah. They’re getting longer. It feels like they’re getting longer. But anytime you can go back and see the great classes that come back. I think there was like eighty-something guys that went back this year. It’s always good to go back and see those guys and see the guys that are getting enshrined that year.”

 

Q: What can you tell people about rookie cornerback DeMarcus Van Dyke?

A: “Well, DVD is his nickname. He’s going to be good. It’s the little things that he has to work on. He has to learn how to finish. He’s still learning the little things about playing corner in this league, playing the different coverages, when to do certain things, when not to do certain things. But if he keeps progressing in the positive manner like he has in the first week or so, he’ll be a decent player.”

 

Q: What is it about Van Dyke that caught your eye when you worked him out before the NFL draft?

A: “He has great hips. He reminds me of a player that I played with in Baltimore, Duane Starks. When he got drafted coming out of The U, and we were in Baltimore, he had great hips, great feet. DVD reminds me of him. He’s a little bit taller. His range, I don’t think too many receivers are outrunning him. So, he has to learn to break down, move his body weight and transition when he’s playing in space. If he does that, he can be a pretty good player.”

 

Q: What are your impressions of free safety Michael Huff?

A: “Mike’s a player. He’s a playmaker. He has a natural instinct, a natural gift. I’m also coaching the nickels. I coach more with the other guys than I do with him. When you don’t have to coach as much with a certain guy, it makes your job a little easier. That’s when you know he has that natural gift. You don’t have to tell him to do the little things. It just comes naturally to him.”

 

Q: Do your Hall of Fame credentials help you coach so many young players?

A: “It’s a start. But if I tell them to go the wrong way, it’s not going to last too long. I’m just trying to point them in the right direction. Each player is different. Every player learns differently. Some guys are audio learners, some guys are visual, some guys need to do the reps. The things that I did in my career, I can’t ask the same guy to do the same thing. It really depends upon their abilities. Each player plays within that ability. If they can do that and I can help them cultivate their tool belt, so to speak, in their craft, then I’m doing my job as a coach.”

 

Q: What kind of coverage does defensive coordinator Chuck Bresnahan prefer?

A: “Multiple. The great defenses that I played with, and I know Chuck has been around, have done a multiple of things. I don’t think you can do one thing and be good at it. What has to happen in this league is, you have to make the quarterback think after he touches the football. What Chuck is trying to cultivate with his defense is, to give multiple looks, make sure we have our disguises in the secondary and linebackers and from that we move to what we’re going to play in. If we can do that, then we’re headed in the right direction. Chuck, what he wants to do is, give multiple looks, multiple defenses and make the quarterback guess.”

 

Q: What is your impression of Stanford Routt after 10 days? Is he an elite cornerback?

A: “He can be. Stanford, he’s a work in progress. He has natural gifts. Every player that gets drafted in the NFL has those gifts. He has to cultivate those gifts. He’s had Willie here for so long, he has learned under Nnamdi. It’s his turn to learn how to play the game and learn to trust himself. The elite players learn to trust themselves on the field. Once he does that and he pulls the trigger when he has opportunities to pull the trigger, his game is going to elevate, his interceptions is going to go up and that’s when you’re going to start hearing his name more so than you have in the past.”

 

Q: Can pulling that trigger once and making a big play start that process?

A: “Everything’s a process. Step by step. What Stanford has done so far in this new system is, he’s learning the system, he’s learning how to trust himself, he’s learning how to work his eyes, his balance with his feet, all the things that you need to do as a defensive back, as a defensive player, as an NFL player, to trust what you have learned in the meeting room, on the field and apply back to the practice field and game day. Those are the elite players. He’s in the process of doing so.”

 

Q: Do the Raiders really play 90 percent man or however much?

A: “I know when I was here, we played multiple coverages. We played four, we played man, we played some zones. That’s what we’re going to do again. I don’t know what they did in the seven or eight years that I was gone, but that doesn’t matter. What matters is, this year, 2011 Raiders, that the guys buy in to what Hue is selling. All the guys are doing that. We’re learning that there’s a standard that we’re asking of our players when they step on the practice field, there’s a practice for when we step (on the field) on game day. And it doesn’t matter if it’s the first-team guy, second-team guy, the third-team guy, the standard is set. You have to live up the standard or you won’t be a Raider.”

 

Q: What do you think of Chris Johnson?

A: “Chris can play. I like Chris. He’s an old wily vet. He’s kind of the same way as Stanford a little bit. He has to start trusting himself and start pulling that trigger. All the film study, everything we’re giving him as coaches, everything he’s learned throughout his career and from other players, once he can apply that back to the field and not hesitate, those are the guys that you really look forward to see play. C.J. is in that process. He believes that he can do certain things and as he progresses this year, he’s going to have a good year.”

 

Q: Do those guys need to play better to compensate for the loss of Asomugha?

A: “Even with Nnamdi, if Nnamdi was here, I would tell him Nnamdi the same thing. He didn’t have a lot of picks. He was a shut-down corner but pulling the trigger gives you the opportunity to make picks. They have to start pulling that trigger. There’s certain things throughout the practice, there’s certain plays, you only get two or three plays as a defensive back to make plays. Once they start learning how to pull that trigger, and I’m talking about the safeties, the DBs, the linebackers, the defensive linemen, everybody, we’ll be an explosive defense.”

 

Q: Have you always wanted to coach?
A: “I thought about it for years but after playing for 17 years I was offered my first few years when I first retired, but I needed to get away. So, being away for seven years, I thought this was the best time to give it a shot, see if I like it, see if I don’t mess the guys up too much. If I can do that, then I’ll try to make a career of it.”

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  • Just Fire Baby

    Bill Parcells will yell and scream at everyone, and it worked well in New York, and pretty much was an epic fail in Dallas.

    Hue yelling at people more may work, and if they struggle to a 2-4 start, dudes may just tune him out.

    Yelling at high school kids works 99% of the time. Not so much in the NFL.

    I think Rod Woodson would make a very cerebal, and exceptional Head Coach, based on this interview I just read.

  • Davy Jones

    Just because you play the 3-4 as your base D doesn’t mean you can’t play the 4-3 on a few downs, and just because Al Davis doesn’t “believe” in deception doesn’t mean he will or does play man to man every play.

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    # RAIDER Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 11:35 am

    Mistic, Al Davis was the one who said he didn’t believe in deception. Believed in coming right after the opponent. Believes you don’t need to use deception when you have superior players. You can just come right at your opponent, and they can know what’s coming. He’s said this, several times. It’s the Raider freakin’ philosophy, for crying out loud. Of course, the Raiders never actually won this way since the ’60s, as you’ve pointed out. Thank you for making my next argument, btw.
    =======================================

    Al Davis isnt coaching this team, hu jack is. hu jack has the freedom to do what he sees fit. You will still see us line up and smash the defense, but you will also see shifts and motions.

    Again look at the team under gruden ( whom you love so dearly) shifts and motions on every snap. Davis’s personal take on the concept had no impact on what happened on the field.

    By the way 01-02 raiders were pretty good and were play off teams, and that wasnt the 60′s

  • http://ultimatecheerleaders.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/kellyjasminekindra.jpg RAIDER

    JFB, don’t you see what Mistic’s doing by saying “if he gets pass protection”? He’s setting the line up to be blamed. He’s basically covering his bets. If Campbell does good, he’s right. If Campbell sucks, it’s the line’s fault, and he called it from the start.

  • http://ultimatecheerleaders.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/kellyjasminekindra.jpg RAIDER

    Mistic, by covering your bets like that, and giving the disclaimer that “If Campbell gets protection, he’ll be good”, you’re only showing us you really don’t believe in him. Otherwise, why cover your bets? Why not just flat out say he’ll be good? Think Green Bay fans are saying Rodgers will be good if he gets protection? They just know he’ll be good, one way or the other. Either take a stand for your player or stand mute. You sound ridiculous. Everyone here knows what you’re doing.

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    Just Fire Baby Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 11:36 am

    If he gets some pass protection he will easily do that.

    *******************************

    Easily??

    I would be happy with him barely doing it.

    He has been very consistant, right at 1.7 TD’s-turnovers every season.
    ===========================================

    Boring, here we go again… predictably.

    JC didnt have the weapons he has now, and has never had good pass protection.

    I dont consider what he has done in the past other than his yearly improvement under the gun, and awash in team disunity dysfunction and total chaos.

    he doesnt play for those teams, or in that environment any longer. If he managed to improve under those circumstances yearly, i see no reason to believe he wont continue to improve here, with better coaches better players and a better environment. for the first time in his career the team is his. jason campbell is a fantastic player that has found his footing with stability and continuity. he is poised and prepared for this moment.

    You can hate on him all you want, just be ready to take that a$$ whoopin when we win….because you know its coming

  • RaiderRockstar

    I am concerned of some rookie struggles on the O-line Thursday.

    Don’t want Soup on the field with these rookies to start the year.

    Not a good risk/reward scenario, IMO.

    Let the rookies get their red wings against the 2nd stringers and with Boller’s knees on the field, until they are really, really ready.

    ***

    Agreed!

    Give JCamp Veldheer-Loper-Satele-Carlisle-Barnes and then yank him after 2 series of each Preseason game.

    Boller, Edwards & La Secla can test Barks, Wiz, Schuening, Heyer and Pelc …

  • RaiderRockstar

    JC didnt have the weapons he has now, and has never had good pass protection.

    ***

    Portis, Moss, Cooley, Samuels & Jansen = no weapons?

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    RAIDER Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 11:43 am

    Mistic, by covering your bets like that, and giving the disclaimer that “If Campbell gets protection, he’ll be good”, you’re only showing us you really don’t believe in him.
    ==============================
    Weak sauce

    I didnt say that. Jason Campbell is already good, the fumbles will come down if he isnt being hit. That is common sense. the offense will be much netter as a whole with better pass protection. All 3 of our qbs were running for their lives and being knocked out of games last year. Oh you dont want to admit that, because it proves cable sucked?

  • Raider J

    Just Fire Baby Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 11:28 am
    Can Soup get us 2 TD’s for every turnover this season?

    He has never done it in his career, and if he doesn’t do it this year, it might be the end of his career as annointed NFL starter.

    :::::::::::::::::::

    “During the Raiders’ final five games, Campbell completed 64.7 percent of his passes with six touchdowns and only two interceptions for an impressive 94.6 passer rating.”

    RedneckRaider Says:
    August 8th, 2011 at 12:01 pm
    http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8214e83b/article/raiders-campbell-ready-to-take-the-next-step-to-stardom?module=HP11_content_stream

    ::::::::::::::::::::

    Theres no reason to believe that JC cant continue to perform on that level

    46. Campbell was not responsible for run D stats even indirectly. He played well in those games. Run D gave up big plays. The players weren’t replaced but the staff was so, the pressure is on Chuck B & his staff

  • http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/526101/AlDavis1_medium.jpg KoolKell

    The new QBR is a lot more comphrensive way to judge QB play. You’ll have to wait and see, boys.

  • BeAlwaysUrselfCommittingtoExcellence2011

    91.J Hill Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 11:29 am
    So who’s going to be the first NFL player caught up in the new HGH testing?

    Or which players are going to be outta the league because they stopped using it?

    *********************

    Adrian Peterson and Vernon Davis…..fa sho

  • Just Fire Baby

    And what was with ARmond last night saying there is few fans on here?

    People take my criticism of DHB as me “wanting to be right”.

    Well, ask JHill, Dakota, Rockstar and SnB about the 2008 draft. I was the only one on here who wanted a WR and didn’t mind DHB!!!! Everyone else wanted O-lineman, BJ Raji or Rey Mualaga.

    So if I really wanted to be “right” I would be all over DHB’s practice exploits, patting myself on the back.

    Come on ARmond, your better than that!!

    KoolKell rags on Al Davis all the time. You think he is rooting against the Raiders on Sunday to right on here?

    Dakota and Rockstar mock Rolando McClain. You think they are not rooting for him to rip heads?

    Mistic1 ridiculed Bruce at any and every stop. You think he was rooting for the Cardinals or Dolphins last year so he could be “right”?

    MistaBrown clowns Seabass all the time,more than anyone else. Was he excited when he missed the chippie in AZ?

    Come on!!! Take a deep breath.

    (Sorry had to get that off my chest)

  • BeAlwaysUrselfCommittingtoExcellence2011

    111.KoolKell Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 11:59 am
    The new QBR is a lot more comphrensive way to judge QB play. You’ll have to wait and see, boys.

    ********************************

    No bruh its not

  • http://build-a-bully 909RaiderLifer

    Monday brought about the much-awaited debut of wide receiver Darrius Heyward-Bey, at least in terms of participating in full-team drills.

    Heyward-Bey spent the first 12 days of camp working his way back into shape from a mysterious injury and getting in some light work with his teammates. Finally, coach Hue Jackson turned loose Heyward-Bey to see where his third-year receiver is at nearly two weeks into camp.

    “““““““““““““““““““““““““““`
    Vagisil <——works everytime!….

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    # RaiderRockstar Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 11:52 am

    JC didnt have the weapons he has now, and has never had good pass protection.

    ***

    Portis, Moss, Cooley, Samuels & Jansen = no weapons?
    =======================

    portis = brittle, rarely played a full season. Locker room cancer, highly over rated.

    Moss = not the game breaker or vertical threat he once was in ny, more of a possession guy in dc. doesnt draw double coverage, and didnt have any one opposite. Randle el and santana moss your starting wr, terrible.

    Cooly = another good possesion guy that JC help make into a star and a pro bowler, simply because there wernt many options to throw to. Note JC leaves and cooly falls off.

    samuals= injuries have curtailed his career. besides one good linemen doesnt mean you have a good line

    Jansen = even two good linemen doesnt make a good line

    Moss and cooly are your top targets!?!?!

    Like i said jc didnt have the weapons he has now

  • Just Fire Baby

    The new QBR is a lot more comphrensive way to judge QB play. You’ll have to wait and see, boys.

    ***************************

    Soup went from 19th to 24th from the old to new ratings.

  • bcz24

    Bill Parcells will yell and scream at everyone, and it worked well in New York, and pretty much was an epic fail in Dallas.

    Hue yelling at people more may work, and if they struggle to a 2-4 start, dudes may just tune him out.

    Yelling at high school kids works 99% of the time. Not so much in the NFL.

    I think Rod Woodson would make a very cerebal, and exceptional Head Coach, based on this interview I just read.
    *************************
    Hue is loud at practice but I dont think that means he is ‘yelling at people’. He is a boisterous man. After listening to his press conferences every night I really appreciate what he says. Its not just the same drivel day in and day out like what you got from Tommy Boy.

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    portis moss cooly randle el vs

    dhb, reece , dmac, chaz, murphy, moore, boss ford

    JC didnt have the weapons he has now and it isnt even close

  • Raider J

    JC is guilty of taking over 1/2 of the 2010 season to figure out how to run the defense. Once he figured it out he had success against good teams who were making playoff runs, he had a good off season and has more playmakers.

    9-11 wins

  • Just Fire Baby

    Portis, Moss, Cooley = all Pro Bowls.

    Not to mention HOF left tackle Samuels.

    Not as fast as our guys, twice as productive (so far)

  • BeAlwaysUrselfCommittingtoExcellence2011

    lol Vegas

  • BeAlwaysUrselfCommittingtoExcellence2011

    QB rating is garbage

  • Raider J

    Oops! run the OFFENSE of course.

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    # Just Fire Baby Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 12:00 pm

    Mistic1 ridiculed Bruce at any and every stop. You think he was rooting for the Cardinals or Dolphins last year so he could be “right”?

    ====================

    lets be clear.

    i hammered bruce because you and other haters tried to tell me that bruce was better than JC. You and a host of others even said bruce should start over JC. so in turn i pointed out the reasons why JC was a far better option.

    Turns out i was right

  • Just Fire Baby

    Point is, were you rooting against the Raiders and Bruce Gradkowski?

    Of course your weren’t. Just like nobody is rooting against Soup and DHB on Sundays.

    This whole “I’m a bigger fan than you” is the most comical thing ever.

  • http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/526101/AlDavis1_medium.jpg KoolKell

    Total QBR:

    Dividing Credit

    Division of credit is the next step. Dividing credit among teammates is one of the most difficult but important aspects of sports. Teammates rely upon each other and, as the cliché goes, a team might not be the sum of its parts. By dividing credit, we are forcing the parts to sum up to the team, understanding the limitations but knowing that it is the best way statistically for the rating.

    On a pass play, for instance, there are a few basic components:
    • The pass protection
    • The throw
    • The catch
    • The run after the catch

    In the first segment, the blockers and the quarterback have responsibility for keeping the play alive, and the receivers have to get open for a QB to avoid a sack or having to throw the ball away. On the throw itself, a quarterback has to throw an accurate ball to the intended receiver. Certain receivers might run better or worse routes, so the ability of a QB to be on target also relates somewhat to the receivers. For the catch, it might be a very easy one where the QB laid it in right in stride and no defenders were there to distract the receiver. Or it could be that the QB threaded a needle and defenders absolutely hammered the receiver as he caught the ball, making it difficult to hold on. So even the catch is about both the receiver and the QB. Finally, the run after the catch depends on whether a QB hit the receiver in stride beyond the defense and on the ability of a receiver to be elusive. Whatever credit we give to the blockers, receivers and quarterback in these situations is designed to sum to the team expected points added.

    The ESPN video tracking has been useful in helping to separate credit in plays like these. We track overthrows, underthrows, dropped passes, defended passes and yards after the catch. The big part was taking this information and analyzing how much of it was related to the QB, the receivers and the blockers. Not surprisingly, pass protection is related mostly to the QB and the offensive line, but yards after the catch is more about what the receiver does. Statistical analysis was able to show this, and we divided credit based on those things.

    As a relevant side note, statistical analysis showed that what we call a dropped pass was not all a receiver’s fault, either. A receiver might drop a ball because he wanted to run before catching it, because the defense distracted him, because it was a little bit behind him or because he was about to get hit by a defender. If the defender was there a half second before, the defender would have knocked the ball free and it would have been called a “defended pass,” not a “dropped pass.” There are shades of gray even on a dropped pass, and analysis showed that. Drops are less a QB’s fault than defended passes or underthrows, but the QB does share some blame.

    On most other plays, quarterbacks receive some portion of credit for the result of the play, including defensive pass interference, intentional grounding, scrambles, sacks, fumbles, fumble recoveries (Carson Palmer once recovered a teammate’s fumble that saved the game for the Bengals) and throwaways.

    On plays when the QB just hands off to a running back, we didn’t assign any credit to the QB. Our NFL experts did suggest that some QBs are very good at interpreting defenses pre-snap and identifying better holes for their backs. However, they also told us it would be nearly impossible to incorporate. Because they suggested this, we built in the ability to give credit for QBs when they just handed off, but we couldn’t find the right analysis to do it in 2011.

  • http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/526101/AlDavis1_medium.jpg KoolKell

    continued, Total QBR:

    Clutch Index

    The final major step is to look at how “clutch” the situation was when creating expected points. A normal play has a clutch index of 1.0. For instance, first-and-goal from the 10-yard line in a tie game at the start of the second quarter has a clutch index of almost exactly 1.0. A more clutch situation, one late in the game when the game is close — the same situation as above but midway through the fourth quarter, for example — has a clutch index of about 2.0. Maximum clutch indices are about 3.0, and minimum indices are about 0.3.

    These clutch index values came from an analysis of how different situations affect a game’s win probability on average. One way to think of it is in terms of pressure. A clutch play is defined before the play by how close the game appears to be. Down four points with three seconds to go and facing third-and-goal from the 3-yard line — that is a high-pressure and high-clutch index situation because the play can realistically raise the odds of winning to almost 100 percent or bring them down from about 40 percent to almost zero percent. The same situation from midfield isn’t as high pressure because it’s very unlikely that the team will pull out the victory. Sure, a Hail Mary can pull the game out, but if it doesn’t work, the team didn’t fail on that play so much as it failed before then. On third-and-goal from the 3-yard line, failure means people will be talking about that final play and what went wrong.

    The clutch indices are multiplied by the quarterback’s expected points on plays when the QB had a significant contribution, then divided by the sum of the clutch indices and multiplied by 100 to get a clutch-valued expected points added per 100 plays.

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    Just Fire Baby Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 12:05 pm

    Portis, Moss, Cooley = all Pro Bowls.
    =====================

    Funny how people want to point to the probowl berths of cooly and moss and yet wont acknowledge the guy that threw them the ball.

    By the way making the probowl as an alternate doesnt mean your are a great player.

    you have countered my point. JC is in a far better situation than he ever was in dc. he improved every year with the foreskins even though the team weas a disaster, and he had to learn a new playbook and a new coach every year.

    of course he will be even better with the situation he is in now

  • http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXj7I1RzLSE&feature=related exlaraiderseasonticketholder

    Sometimes, Head Coach’s who yell are successful at the College level. Usually pro players tune them out. Lou Holtz was a prime example.

  • Master Beeecham

    Another typical day of old goat Krappy arguing with his grandson Brian the Genital.

    Guess the Kelly Family Punching Bags are just warming up for the season. Don’t worry folks, I’ll continue slapping these knuckleheads around for our amusement.

    Dudes got the Reggae Party Boat outfitted with a specially designed PARTYDUDE 8000 Margarita Machine that also steams up Pigs in a Blanket.

    The babes are already going wild for it and I’m suddenly forced to buy my Magnums by the carton

  • http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/526101/AlDavis1_medium.jpg KoolKell

    A Rating from 0 to 100

    The final step is transforming the clutch-valued expected points rate to a number from 0 to 100. This is just a mathematical formula with no significance other than to make it easier to communicate. A value of 90 and above sounds good whether you’re talking about a season, a game or just third-and-long situations; a value of four or 14 doesn’t sound very good; a value of 50 is average, and that is what QBR generates for an average performance.

    That being said, the top values in a season tend to be about 75 and above, whereas the top values in a game are in the upper 90s. Aaron Rodgers might have gone 31-of-36 for 366 yards, with three passing TDs, another TD running, 19 first-down conversions, and eight conversions on third or fourth down in one game — for a single-game Total QBR of 97.2 — but he can’t keep that up all year long. Pro Bowl-level performance for a season usually means a QBR of at least 65 or 70. We don’t expect to see a season with a QBR in the 90s.

  • http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXj7I1RzLSE&feature=related exlaraiderseasonticketholder

    Kool Kell copies and pastes well. Never has a well thought out original post though. lmfao

  • http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/526101/AlDavis1_medium.jpg KoolKell

    Concluding Thoughts

    What underlies QBR is an understanding of how football works and a lot of detailed situational data. What it yields are results that should reflect that. It illustrates that converting on third-and-long is important to a quarterback. It shows that a pass that is in the air for 40 yards is more reflective of a quarterback than a pass that is in the air for 5 yards and the receiver has 35 yards of run after the catch. These premises should sound reasonable to football fans. They come out of a lot of statistical analysis, but they are also consistent with what coaches and players understand.

    As we neared the end of the development of QBR, we talked to Ron Jaworski and Greg Cosell at NFL Films about its evolution. Cosell said at one point, “Football is not complex, but it is very detailed.” I realized then that QBR is like that. It is very detailed, accounting for a lot of different situations, but it is not particularly complex. It really does try to see the game the way we have gotten used to seeing it in its elegant simplicity. We hope you, the fan, appreciate it, as well.

  • RaiderRockstar

    Portis, Moss, Cooley = all Pro Bowls.

    Not to mention HOF left tackle Samuels.

    Not as fast as our guys, twice as productive (so far)

    ***

    Exactly, JFB

    Mistic does not want me to post stats for these guys during Campbell’s tenure in Washington.

    JCamp got benched for Todd Collins & Bruce Gradkowski, but there is NO CHANCE he gets benched for Boller or Edwards – right?

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  • BeAlwaysUrselfCommittingtoExcellence2011

    Kell all garbage

  • RaiderRockstar

    Dakota and Rockstar mock Rolando McClain

    ***

    I know, I know. picking on a dude with Crohn’s Disease is pretty low. Thanks for the reminder JFB.

    I’ll try to change my shameful ways!

  • Master Beeecham

    Krappy you senile old fool, no one wants to read your cut and paste nonsense.

    Wouldn’t your time be better spent trying to get a listing? Or did KrappyWife just give you your allowance, so you have plenty of time to kill?

    Sad, sad old goat …

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    My biggest complaint about stanford routt has always been failure to make a play on the ball. in fact that has been my complaint about the entire secondary until Stevie brown showed up last year. i feel that rod woodson will teach these guys that it isnt enough to cover like a blanket, you must take the ball away. The guys have the natural gifts needed to run stride fir stride with anyone, once they learn to loacate and attack the ball they will be much better players.

  • RaiderRockstar

    JFB,

    what would these guys have done if JaMarcus was the #2 QB last year when “Soup” got canned?

    suicide by the masses.

  • big pep

    we have sucd year after year with coaches who come in and stare instead of getting into someones assss when they fuc up. i like ol hue.

  • RaiderRockstar

    Kool Kell copies and pastes well

    ***

    Exla,

    you gotta stick with what you’re good at :)

  • Mistic1 Tha Supavillain

    # Just Fire Baby Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 12:08 pm

    Point is, were you rooting against the Raiders and Bruce Gradkowski?

    Of course your weren’t. Just like nobody is rooting against Soup and DHB on Sundays.

    This whole “I’m a bigger fan than you” is the most comical thing ever.
    ==============

    uhh no

    you are hater and im not. My ridicule of scabs as you call it of was based on the fact that he is terrible, and should never be thought of as JC’s equal….in any universe or dimension. Your claims against JC and in favor of scabs was misguided uninformed and flat out laughable.

  • BeAlwaysUrselfCommittingtoExcellence2011

    143.RaiderRockstar Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 12:23 pm
    Kool Kell copies and pastes well

    ***

    Exla,

    you gotta stick with what you’re good at

    *************************

    hahahahaha good

  • raidertbone

    RaiderRockstar Says:
    August 9th, 2011 at 12:21 pm

    JFB,

    what would these guys have done if JaMarcus was the #2 QB last year when “Soup” got canned?

    suicide by the masses.
    __________________________________

    If anyone was around to see what happened in New York vs. the Giants (in 2009) – THAT’S what would’ve happened … THEN, Hue would’ve kicked his ass and force-fed him cheeseburgers ’till he blew his load on the sidelines … either way, ESPN would’ve gotten a “Not Top 10″ out of it!!

  • RaiderRockstar

    uhh no

    you are hater and im not.

    ***

    JFB = Raider hater?

    LOL!

    Come on, Mistic …

  • http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/526101/AlDavis1_medium.jpg KoolKell

    I think the new Total Quaterback Ranking System is a more comphrensive way to look at a QB’s game, ok?

    Now you simple-minded idiots can go back to Code Black, all day.

  • raidertbone

    JCamp got benched for Todd Collins & Bruce Gradkowski, but there is NO CHANCE he gets benched for Boller or Edwards – right?

    ____________________________

    I guess we shouldn’t start printing up those “In La Secla We Trust” t-shirts, right?

  • BeAlwaysUrselfCommittingtoExcellence2011

    Vegas Raider a hater? Naw not at all….thats my dawg there