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Raiders staff to coach North in Senior Bowl

By Jerry McDonald - NFL Writer
Thursday, January 3rd, 2013 at 3:33 pm in Oakland Raiders.

Raiders coach Dennis Allen and his staff will coach the North team in the Senior Bowl in Mobile, Ala., according to the Senior Bowl web site.

The South team will be coached by Detroit Lions coach Jim Schwartz and his staff.

Coaching the Senior Bowl will in theory give the Raiders a leg up on scouting some of the country’s best senior talent heading into the scouting combine Feb. 20-26 in preparation for the NFL draft from April 25-27.

The Raiders at present hold the No. 3 overall pick in the draft.

“It’s a great opportunity for the Raiders,’’ Allen said in a Senior Bowl release. “It gives us a chance to get a solid evaluation on these players. We get a better feel on them because we see them in meetings, we work with them in practice and we can determine whether their personality will fit well in our locker room.

“It’s an opportunity to get an in-depth feel on a lot of those guys.’’

The Senior Bowl is scheduled for Jan. 26 at 1 p.m. at Ladd Peebles Stadium in Mobile.

The Raiders and Lions staffs will conduct practices throughout the week.

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  • J Hill

    GREAT news!!!

    Will help us with our 4th rd picks and later.

  • Al_is_theraiders

    lmao…great opportunity…go be a college coach then. by the way what staff? seniors are probably…”dayum…this is gonna svck.”

  • Moose

    who will run the offence?

  • da trinity

    I would never coach the Snorth team, its all about that big bad SOUTHSIDE!!!!

  • J Hill

    I still say we are going to get a dynamic player with our 3rd rd pick. That’s a high pick. Some kid who slides out of the 2nd rd.

  • Al_is_theraiders

    rbs are like sh!t 3 yard carries…wrs are like dayum 4 yard outs…

  • JLofty

    How come we get this privelidge so frequently?

  • JB

    OAKLAND RAIDERS ‏@RAIDERS

    Head Coach Dennis Allen and the Raiders coaching staff will coach the North squad in the 2013 Senior Bowl January 26 in Mobile, Alabama.
    ************************

    This is a good thing. Will give us a 1st hand look at the new 2013 draftees.

  • JLofty

    Al Saunders seems capable of running the North O…

  • DutchRaider77

    3.Moose Says:
    January 3rd, 2013 at 3:36 pm
    who will run the offence?

    ________________________________________________________

    Easy solution, the OC for the Raiders will be the victor of a Madden tournament, it could end up we have the youngest OC in NFL history, at age 12.

  • The_Judge37

    4.da trinity Says:
    January 3rd, 2013 at 3:36 pm
    I would never coach the Snorth team, its all about that big bad SOUTHSIDE!!!!
    ——–

    Save that for post #13

  • JB

    Bad links for the next posting

  • da trinity

    DAM, u right judge

    1×3

  • http://000 Bob Marley

    Fellas, I have a good read to recommend.

    These are pieces of a great article by Chris Brown from smart football, I suggest you look it up on the web yourselves as the full article contains plays and pictures that help explain this stuff.

    It’s about the new offensive tendencies that are changing the game.

    “I watched a good football game the other day. One team built a big lead over the other with a dizzying array of strategies: shifts, motions, multiple formations, and even read-option plays, where the quarterback decided whether to hand the ball off or keep it himself based on the defense’s movement.

    With the score 31-3, I nearly stopped watching.

    Then the trailing team sprang to life, scoring four touchdowns in less than a quarter, tying the game 31-31, by throwing the ball 65 times using three, four and five receiver sets and a frenetic no-huddle pace.

    The comeback failed, however, as the team that once led by 28 points responded with a quick touchdown of their own, and won 41-34.

    It was a good game, but an odd one. What was not strange were the teams’ tactics. In high school and college, football has been rapidly changing. New variations on the read-option, no-huddle and all manner of other new offensive strategies seem to pop up every year. There, change is normal.

    But I wasn’t watching two high schools, or even two teams from the Mid-American Conference or the Big 12.

    No, what made the game odd was that I was watching the San Francisco 49ers and the New England Patriots in the National Football League.

    After years of being resistant to change, the NFL is suddenly using the newest and best ideas all over.

    Three of the NFL’s top 10 offenses in yards and four of the top 10 in yards per play all rely to some extent on these innovative schemes.

    So why is the NFL changing now? For the same reason change in football always happens: because football is in a moment, a moment when new kinds of ideas meet a new kind of talent.

    A new class of young, multitalented quarterbacks who can throw and run – not just one or the other – is dragging the NFL to its future.

    About three years ago, Greg Roman, then offensive coordinator at Stanford University, traveled to Reno, Nev., to visit with Nevada Wolf Pack head coach Chris Ault to learn about his “Pistol Offense.”

    Before the 2005 season, Ault, unhappy with his offense, presented his staff with a new idea – a shotgun formation with the running back aligned directly behind the quarterback. “They thought I’d lost my marbles,” Ault recently recalled.

    But with the “Pistol” Nevada went from near the bottom to the top of its conference in offensive production and over the next few years slowly added additional components to the attack to make it even more effective.

    The potency of Ault’s offense peaked during the 2009 season when they finished the season with three 1,000-yard rushers – two running backs as well as lanky junior quarterback, a Colin Kaepernick, who added another 2,000 passing yards and 20 touchdowns.

    The following offseason Roman – along with many other coaches from across the country – visited Ault. He wanted to learn how to add some Pistol looks to the pro-style offense he ran at Stanford under head coach Jim Harbaugh. During their visit, Ault was, according to Roman, “very accommodating and it was very interesting as a coach to go really learn something totally new,” he said, adding, “That was very valuable time spent.”

    The next season Stanford added a few such new looks, but did not focus on it. But, as fate would have it, Roman, now the San Francisco 49ers’ offensive coordinator, still under Harbaugh, coaches Kaepernick, the 49ers’ second-round draft pick in 2011. These days he finds himself going back to his notes from those few days he spent in Reno.

    Still, even with his inside knowledge of Ault’s attack, and Kaepernick on the 49ers’ roster, Roman and Harbaugh didn’t immediately decide to turn things over to their young quarterback.

    Instead, and despite the off-and-on success teams like the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos had dabbling in these concepts with quarterbacks Cam Newton and Tim Tebow in 2011, it was not until this season, when Robert Griffin III entered the NFL and emerged as the Washington Redskins’ starting quarterback, that many other NFL coaches began to realize Ault’s ideas might be the next big thing.

    “The Redskins do it more than anybody,” said Roman. “We’re just starting to tap into it now.”

    Griffin, the second-overall pick in the 2012 draft, is a preternaturally gifted player with a beautiful throwing motion and a knack for making good decisions on the football field – and he also just happens to have track-star speed.

    In college at Baylor, Griffin operated Art Briles’s offense, a no-huddle, fast paced spread-‘em-out-attack which aligned receivers as wide as possible without putting them in the bleachers. Yet while Griffin often ran the ball at Baylor, they rarely used the Pistol look.

    In the NFL, however, under the direction of head coach Mike Shanahan and offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan and with Griffin at quarterback, the Redskins have made extensive use of Ault’s creation.

    When Mike Shanahan was head coach of the Denver Broncos, he melded the West Coast offense he’d used to win a Super Bowl with the zone blocking schemes offensive line coach Alex Gibbs brought from the San Francisco 49ers. Those schemes remain the foundation of the Shanahan-Redskins attack today.

    The Shanahans, in search of some way to mesh Griffin’s special talents with the zone blocking schemes they’d made famous nearly 20 years earlier, settled on the Pistol attack created by Ault as the centerpiece of their offense.

    It’s worked.

    Although the Redskins’ leaky defense and a few close losses have them at 8-6, they have arguably the most efficient offense in the NFL, fourth in total yards and leading the league with 6.2 yards per play. Another rookie, sixth-round draft choice Alfred Morris, is third in the league in rushing, while Griffin is second in the league in passing rating, a remarkable performance by a rookie quarterback.

    Although Pistol offense schemes are a big part of the Redskins’ identity, it’s not all they do. Their key to success has been that the Shanahans have found a way to blend the new schemes with what they’ve had success with for many years in the NFL, creating something that is a perfect fit for their uniquely talented rookie quarterback.

    “There are no gimmicks in our offense,” Nevada head coach Chris Ault recently explained. “When the shotgun offenses came out, I enjoyed watching those teams move the football. The thing I did not like was the idea of a running back getting the ball running east and west,” he said. “We have always been a north and south running game offense.”

    The entire premise of Ault’s pistol attack is to combine the best of the shotgun spread offenses, like Chip Kelly’s attack at Oregon, with the traditional, north-south power attack Ault had coached for more than 20 years. The Pistol alignment is merely the means by which to do it; the “Pistol Offense” is this blend of old and new.

    It is easy to see why Ault’s vision had more appeal to the NFL mindset than the “east-west” schemes of Chip Kelly or the other spread offense gurus. The NFL is a league concerned with its image, and, despite the efficacy of those offenses, for the NFL to adopt something as its own it must appeal both to the ego and the mind.

    There was never any doubt these concepts would eventually be adopted by NFL coaches as a useful tool in a larger arsenal, but many resisted the notion of ever making the concepts the centerpiece of a team’s offense.

    The most common reason cited for such resistance was NFL defenses were simply too fast, too strong, too complex and too good for it to be successful. Yet that always got the point backwards.

    Those factors – while all true – also made it inevitable that the NFL would eventually adopt these concepts: Ault’s Pistol zone read attack, Chip Kelly’s no-huddle spread option, and other variants mathematically tip the scales back to the offense’s favor.

    It’s basic arithmetic.

    “As I’ve tried to explain to people, whenever the guy who takes the snap is a threat to run, it changes all the math of defenses,” Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Greg Schiano said last March. “That’s really what defense is, it’s getting your troops to where the ball is going to be. And when that guy holding it is a threat to run, it changes the numbers – minus-one.”

    And it’s not all about running. The other reason – maybe the major reason – the NFL is now catching on is that they now see the effect these schemes can have on passing.

    When the quarterback is a threat to run, defenses must stack the line of scrimmage, opening up passing lanes and one-on-one matchups for wide receivers outside.
    “You do read-option, read-option, read-option and then get them to play seven or eight in the box and you’ve got so many variations of plays and passes you can run off that,” Cam Newton said recently.

    Indeed, Mike Shanahan thinks that play-action which fakes a zone-read, whether from the pistol or other shotgun sets, is actually better than traditional under-center play-action because of the increased influence it has on linebackers and safeties looking for the run. “Not a little bit more,” said Shanahan. “A lot more”.

    Just as Roman and Harbaugh have embraced the trend to take better advantage of Colin Kaepernick’s skills, Seattle Seahawk head coach Pete Carroll has tapped into the best read option concepts as a spark for his offense led by his own dynamic rookie quarterback, Russell Wilson.

    Following a 19-13 loss to the St. Louis Rams, Carroll watched film of Griffin’s Redskins attack and saw something he didn’t necessarily expect: an NFL team successfully using the very concepts he’d had to deal with when he was head coach at Southern Cal and faced Chip Kelly’s Oregon team.

    “They’re way ahead of everybody else in terms of their commitment to a really college style of offense,” Carroll said of the Redskins. “And it’s been very effective.”.

    While the Seahawks have not used the Pistol much this year, they have increasingly adopted the zone read and other college-style schemes. “It just opens you up to the possibility of some things to do,” Carroll explained.

    “It was a good move for me and it’s helped us a little bit. I was influenced a little bit more than I thought when I first looked at it. You see some of our stuff coming to life and it’s helping us.”

    The common motivation for change in the NFL is not the genius of the coaches, or a desire to be revolutionary, or any kind of special tactical wisdom unforeseen by anyone before.

    In the NFL, change is not driven so much by the ideas themselves as by the skills of its players.

    In this instance it is the need to find a way that best takes advantage of the dynamic talent of young quarterbacks like Griffin, Kaepernick and Wilson.

    As long as more quarterbacks with their skills keep coming into the league, the NFL will continue to adapt.”

  • Whoknows

    Moose Says:
    January 3rd, 2013 at 3:36 pm
    who will run the offence?
    ****************************
    Who will coach the defense?

  • ArtilleryShell

    Post 3 who will run the offense is funny as #¥€%!! It is a good advantage and our 3rd round pick will probably on that squad. Or it will influence Reggie even more to trade down

  • ArtilleryShell

    The senior bowl rarely has top 5 players, for fear of injury or devaluation. We need a 2nd round pick but trading players accelerates the cap hit. Huff needs to restructure, and DT Kelly as well. Neither would bring a 2nd but a 4th maybe or late 3rd to a contending team

  • Just Win Baby

    What staff?

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  • dcraiderfan

    Now, a disater waiting to happened for the North team!! Hey Mark, you’d lost an opprtunity to get Reid now! Basement dweller for the AFC West! Knuckleheads!!!

  • DaRaiders022

    Yup…if the OC is Knapp, expect that potent power-sweep to the left and right! Hopefully we find some potential D linemen and D backs. GET RID OF HUFF TODAY!

  • jesusraiderjim

    Okay I am here where the FVCK is everyone else. Are you just manipulating me? BWAHAHAHAHA

  • r8eray

    24!!!

    What up!

  • jesusraiderjim

    At a kid Ray

  • jesusraiderjim

    Should help everyone using a phone make it a bit faster

  • DJ Johnny

    Hey. What’s up dudes. Nice to be able to type something and see it right away.

  • DJ Johnny

    This must be where the cool people hang out.

  • R8drinOK

    Good Morning Raider bros!

    Do we have a new OC yet? A least interview somebody Reggie! Watching the playoffs this weekend reminded me just how bad our offense & O-line were this year…OUCH

  • R8drinOK

    I should say…interview someone Reggie and Dennis!

  • Purvisman/Intrepid// Full Disclosure

    I’m in!

  • hwnrdr

    Much faster

  • Purvisman/Intrepid// Full Disclosure

    I’ll keep telling them to go back to the future.

  • hwnrdr

    4k posts…could be a possibility

  • jesusraiderjim

    I love a good revolt

  • papertiger418

    I’m still frustrated that we haven’t even gone out and signed an ST coordinator; thete’s no reason not to if Reggie is just waiting around for some GB practice squad coach to be our next OC.

  • jesusraiderjim

    Well at least these college prospects wont have KNapp poluting thier game and minds

  • R8drinOK

    Purvisman/Intrepid// Full Disclosure Says:
    January 7th, 2013 at 9:49 am
    I’ll keep telling them to go back to the future.

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Great movie, always wanted that sports almanac…I thought back then the Raiders would’ve had at least 2 more SB wins by the year 2000.

  • DMAC

    DMAC Says:
    January 7th, 2013 at 9:45 am

    Morning/afternoon peoples!

    Happy New Year to all!!!
    Whats smokin in the 2013 Green Party?

  • hwnrdr

    Question on that one…if Bo doesn’t go down, would we have beaten Buffalo and NY Giants?

  • r8eray

    Hell yeah…mucho mas better!!

  • hwnrdr

    What’s up DMAC?

  • DMAC

    What up Hwnrdr
    Happy new year brother

  • jesusraiderjim

    Back to the “cop subject”

    Cops are trampling our basic rights more and more each day.
    They do some underhanded shvt and get away with it because people let them.

    I used to believe a lot differently than I do now and I do realize that there are a FEW good ones out there.

    Don’t talk to cops easieast way to stay out of trouble

  • DMAC

    Whats the Norv update?
    Is he our OC yet, or has he found another gig?

  • R8drinOK

    hwnrdr Says:
    January 7th, 2013 at 9:56 am
    Question on that one…if Bo doesn’t go down, would we have beaten Buffalo and NY Giants?

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    That question always tortured my mind in the 1990′s…with Bo anything was possible. As long as Jay Schroder wasn’t throwing the ball.

  • jesusraiderjim

    Does anyone make anything out of Norvs comments to Pryor or was Norv just being a decent human being?

  • hwnrdr

    DMAC Says:
    January 7th, 2013 at 9:58 am
    Whats the Norv update?
    Is he our OC yet, or has he found another gig?

    Rumored to go to NY Jets…funny is that they still have their OC in place, but Ryan wants him

  • DJ Johnny

    29.R8drinOK Says:
    January 7th, 2013 at 9:40 am
    Good Morning Raider bros!

    Do we have a new OC yet? A least interview somebody Reggie! Watching the playoffs this weekend reminded me just how bad our offense & O-line were this year…OUCH

    I think on offense, if we have a competent OC we will be alot better.

    The glaring need I see (everybody has their own take) is at the reciever positions.

    Waaaaay too many drops. If it wasn’t thrown directly in the hands of the receivers it would get dropped or tipped and intercepted. Guys would not make plays…period. No fighting for the ball, or coming back to it to bail Palmer out when he was under duress.

    For the 1st time all yr. I saw another team look as bad as we did at receiver and that’s the Colts.

    It was horrible the way they were dropping balls at the most critical times.

    4th an 4 with the game and season on the line and Luck tosses a simple little play towards the sideline and it goes right thru the receivers hands.

    Only time all yr i’ve seen a team be as bad as the Raiders in that regard.

  • hwnrdr

    R8drinOK Says:
    January 7th, 2013 at 9:59 am
    hwnrdr Says:
    January 7th, 2013 at 9:56 am
    Question on that one…if Bo doesn’t go down, would we have beaten Buffalo and NY Giants?

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    That question always tortured my mind in the 1990’s…with Bo anything was possible. As long as Jay Schroder wasn’t throwing the ball.

    LOL< True though!