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Education reform advocate touts charter schools, online learning

By Theresa Harrington
Tuesday, October 11th, 2011 at 7:08 pm in California, Clayton, Concord, Contra Costa County, Education, Mt. Diablo school district, West Contra Costa school district.

Many education reformers focus their attention on low-income schools with a high percentage of English language learners and students who are in ethnic minorities.

But, Lance Izumi — an author and senior director for education at the Pacific Research Institute public policy think tank — says suburban campuses that don’t at first appear to fit the profile of low-performing schools can also benefit from education reforms.

During a recent speech to the Contra Costa Taxpayers Association in Pleasant Hill, Izumi highlighted Clayton Valley High School in Concord as an example of such a campus.

“At Clayton Valley, less than two out of 10 students are socio-economically disadvantaged, which means that the large majority of students are not from low-income families, and probably most are middle class,” he said. “Many people would therefore assume that the school would be higher performing. If you look at Clayton Valley test scores, however, one sees some real problems.”

He said 42 percent of 11th-graders failed to score proficient in English last spring.

“It was much worse in math,” Izumi said, “with a combined 68 percent of 11th graders taking the Algebra II and summative math exams failing to score at proficiency.”

Here is a link to a video of his speech:
http://qik.com/video/44692587.

Izumi also referred to a Global Report Card at www.globalreportcard.org, which shows how students in districts in the United States compare to students in countries such as Singapore, Canada and Switzerland.

He touted online learning as a good way to reach all types of students — from remedial to advanced, including English language learners and children with autism — saying programs adjust to students’ learning levels.

Some in the audience were receptive to his message, while others were skeptical.

Rene Maher, of Pleasant Hill, said she sent her children to parochial schools because she wasn’t satisfied with local public schools. However, she was encouraged by statistics cited by Izumi about improvement achieved at some schools in California with charters and online programs.

Some West Contra Costa district parents, on the other hand, told me they would have preferred that Izumi focus on improving teaching in the classroom. They questioned whether one purpose of his speech was to sell his books, which he referenced a few times.

Do you believe charter schools and online education offer suitable alternatives to traditional public school programs?

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  • http://www.overlooktutorialacademy.net Larry Brown

    Alternative education can, and often does, aid the individual student.

    We work with a number of students working toward diploma or degree online. In fact several of our tutors work entirely online. It does take focus and dedication on the part of the student and consistant support from tutor and family but the flexibility and the chance to tailor the sitation to personal needs can greatly outweigh the challenges.