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10th ballot measure headed for November ballot

By Lisa Vorderbrueggen
Tuesday, June 10th, 2008 at 4:16 pm in 2008 November election, Propositions.

The November election ballot is getting heavy.

The 10th statewide ballot initiative has been certified, a bond measure for alternative fuel vehicles and renewable energy.

The other nine, per the Secretary of State, are a high-speed rail bond; a measure relating to the treatment of farm animals; a children’s hospital bond; a parental notification for abortion measure; a measure involving the sentencing of nonviolent offenders; a measure regarding increased criminal penalties and public safety funding; a measure creating renewable energy generation requirements for utilities; a measure that would amend the state Constitution to define marriage as “between a man and a woman;” and a measure involving victims’ rights in the criminal justice system.

An additional 18 measures are pending signature verification and counts or proponents are still gathering signatures.

Oh joy.

This ballot may end up heavy enough to double as a tire chock after the election. But heck, it’s not all bad. All that money earmarked for promoting and fighting these measures will help keep the state’s political consultants employed during these tough economic times.

Read more for the full text of the Secretary of State’s press release today:

SACRAMENTO - Secretary of State Debra Bowen today certified the tenth initiative for the November 4, 2008, General Election ballot. It is a bond measure for alternative fuel vehicles and renewable energy.

The first nine propositions to qualify for the November ballot were a high-speed rail bond; a measure relating to the treatment of farm animals; a children’s hospital bond; a parental notification for abortion measure; a measure involving the sentencing of nonviolent offenders; a measure regarding increased criminal penalties and public safety funding; a measure creating renewable energy generation requirements for utilities; a measure that would amend the state Constitution to define marriage as “between a man and a woman;” and a measure involving victims’ rights in the criminal justice system.

In order to qualify for the ballot, the tenth measure needed 433,971 valid petition signatures, which is equal to 5% of the total votes cast for governor in the November 2006 General Election. The initiative proponents submitted 779,346 signatures in an attempt to qualify the measure, and it qualified through the random sample signature check.

County elections officials have 30 working days to verify the validity of the signatures filed with their offices using a random sampling method. The state Elections Code requires elections officials to verify 500 signatures, or 3% of the number of signatures filed in their county, whichever is greater. Counties receiving fewer than 500 petition signatures are required to verify all the signatures filed in their offices.

A measure can qualify via random sampling, without further verification, if the sampling projects a number of valid signatures greater than 110% of the required number. This measure needed at least 477,369 projected valid signatures to qualify by random sampling, and it exceeded that threshold today with 481,717 projected valid signatures.

 

The Attorney General’s official title and summary of the initiative is as follows:

    • BONDS. ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES AND RENEWABLE ENERGY. STATUTE. Authorizes $5 billion in bonds paid from state’s General Fund, allocated approximately as follows: 58% in cash payments of between $2,000 and $50,000 to purchasers of certain high fuel economy and alternative fuel vehicles; 20% in incentives for research, development and production of renewable energy technology; 11% in incentives for research and development of alternative fuel vehicle technology; 5% in incentives for purchase of renewable energy technology; 4% in grants to eight cities for education about these technologies; and 3% in grants to colleges to train students in these technologies. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State costs of about $9.8 billion over 30 years to pay both the principal ($5 billion) and interest ($4.8 billion) costs on the bond. Payments of about $325 million per year. Increase in state sales tax revenues of an unknown amount, potentially totaling in the tens of millions of dollars, over the period from 2009 to beyond 2018. Increase in local sales tax and VLF revenues of an unknown amount, potentially totaling in the tens of millions of dollars, over the period from 2009 to about 2018-19. Potential state costs of up to about $10 million annually, through about 2018-19, for state agency administrative costs not funded by the measure. (Initiative 07-0101.)

The proponents for this measure, Allison Hart, Mitzi Dudley, and Thomas Daly, can be reached at (213) 624-6200.

The last day to qualify a measure for the November General Election ballot is June 26.

For more information about how an initiative qualifies for the ballot in California, go to http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/initiative_guide.htm.

To view this and other Secretary of State press releases, go to: http://www.sos.ca.gov/executive/press_releases/news_releases.htm.

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  • Arne Simonsen

    County Clerk Steve Weir is going to have to remind everyone that votes absentee to put two first class stamps on their return ballot!!

  • Alamo voter

    Actually all a voter will need is ONE first class stamp (42 cents) and ONE second ounce stamp (17 cents). Let’s not give the post office more than is needed, after all.

  • Arne Simonsen

    Good point, Alamo Voter!

    I wonder how many of us are going to have 17-cent stamps laying around?

    I still have several rolls of 39-cent stamps and sheets of 2-cent stamps; then I had to go to the post office a couple of weeks ago to pick up sheets of 1-cent stamps.

    So if you ever get a letter from me, it will have at least three stamps on it totally 42 cents until my supply runs out :)