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Miller delivers defiant healthcare speech

By Lisa Vorderbrueggen
Monday, February 1st, 2010 at 12:31 pm in Congress, healthcare reform.

Watch the full video of Rep. George Miller’s speech on health care and other issues at this morning’s breakfast meeting of the Contra Costa County.

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  • RR, Uninvited Columnist

    I started to snooze off, then I lost the sound. Did I miss much?

  • V

    Could not hear it!

  • Ralph Hoffmann

    RR, you missed a great speech for Health Care Reform, with an ending about Americans getting tired chasing into every Country to find 100 Al-Kaida, greeted with thunderous applause. A Hearing Aid will cost you a big deductable, but you may be denied coverage for a pre-existing condition.

  • Ralph Hoffmann

    Or, RR & V, buy some earphones to plug-in to the tower of your PC.

  • John

    George, a 35 year senior congressman showed his experience and expertise as he addressed many of the issues being talked about locally and nationally.

    He spent a significant amount of time explaining his position on everything from healthcare to foreign policy. George even took time to recognize our local columnist.

    Contra Costa Council continues to keep our area businesses and individuals informed by providing these opportunities.

  • RR, Uninvited Columnist

    Geo. Miller represents, above everything else, the ultimate failure of progressive politics. He is clever; astute in pressing the buttons of discontent, class envy and expressing the sentiments of those, in Thoreau’s exquisite phrase, lead lives of quiet desperation. He excels in the art of giving voice to the dumb oxen of society, who, unable to make sense of their lives, want more, and after that, still more. He speaks for the Poor, Children, the poorly educated and the losers in the free market economy. And then he asks for a couple of grand from the successful, to rub shoulders with him, ao he can continue to spread his message of vague yearnings for a better life.

  • http://www.halfwaytoconcord.com Bill Gram-Reefer

    Now now RR, Democrats are people, too!

  • Alany Helmantoler

    George Miller is much respected in the disabled community. Thank you for all your tough work. It is not an easy season.

  • http://www.jeanswatercolors.blogspot.com Jean Womack

    Two things. First, I was told that when Rep. Miller was first elected, the people who put him in office, put him there so that he could get some help for Richmond, CA, which had suffered at the end of WWII when the jobs disappeared, but the people were still there. They wanted someone who would stay there for a long time and get the seniority needed to get things done for the people at home. He has done that. We have Miller to thank for the big Social Security building. He can talk knowledgeably for hours about Social Security, as well as about many other topics. Also, I guess he had a big part in getting the Rosie the Riveter Park, which is really more of a monument to shipbuilding than a park about a war. If they would drop the reference to the war, we would all be a lot better off. That war was over more than 50 years ago and it’s time to stop fighting, especially since I think if we had to fight it again now, we might get beaten pretty badly.

    Secondly, I think health care reform is long overdue and deserves support from every elected official in the country. For example, it is my suspicion that normal law abiding people are made into criminals so that they can get health care from the prison system because they are too poor to get it anywhere else. This is a huge problem for people with disabilities and it puts us into a very oppressive and unfair system. How would you like it if someone kept trying to get you into trouble every five years or so and you could not get a regular job because of a totally unfair label they put on you, that they put there so you could continue to get health care, and you weren’t even told that’s what they were doing. And the health care you were getting was so disrespectful that you could hardly believe it was happening to you.

    Well, it was nice to see Rep. Miller on the job and the people getting their money’s worth from their Congressman, who is practically worshipped as if he was God around here, in spite of many sarcastic comments in this blog. I go to church but I am not quite that religious. I just want to see him happy and healthy, which he appears to be, lately.

    Jean Womack

  • Rich

    George Miller is a fighter for working people, and has been since the day he took office in 1975. He’s showing this once again in his efforts to try and get health care for the 47 million Americans who don’t have it, including thousands of working poor in his Congressional district. Health care shouldn’t only go to the well heeled, but that’s been the trend in recent years. This is a fundamental moral issue, the US isn’t a banana republic. I proud to have him as my Congressman.

  • John W.

    A bit off topic, but GOP Congressman Paul Ryan, WI, a bright and rising star in the party, has put forth some ideas on health care reform and received positive feedback from Obama’s people. Unlike the usual GOP snake oil that allowing people in California to buy insurance from Mississippi will somehow solve problems, he offers some real ideas, including a major change in how Medicare would work in the future for people who currently are under age 55. I don’t agree with his idea that the way to deal with pre-existing conditions is to dump people who have them into state high risk pools (socializing risk and privatizing profit), but some of his other ideas definitely are conversation starters. I got the summary from a health industry newsletter, but I’m pretty sure you can get the same info from Ryan’s official website.

  • Tom

    So why is George avoiding a Town hall meetings with his constituents, most folks cannot attend these functions that are appearing on video, He went to the MT Diablo Peace organization with a few members. We need George to meet with the regular folks. Tom