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Watch Karl Rove interview in Lafayette

By Lisa Vorderbrueggen
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010 at 6:15 pm in Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics, Republican Party, Republican politics.

I covered former White House deputy chief of staff Karl Rove’s speech and book-signing event in Lafayette at noon today and he spent about 20 minutes with reporters after his appearance event. Watch the video below.

Rove answered questions about the California gubernatorial and U.S. senate races, the role of the tea party movement and his recommended fixes to the recently adopted health care legislation. Rove is on a book tour, where he is promoting his memoir, “Courage and Consequence: My Life as a Conservative and the Fight.”

Read the ContraCostaTimes tomorrow for my full story.

I didn’t have room in the print version for Rove’s interesting comments during the interview about the tea party movement, which has seen some bad publicity from the actions of some of its more extremist members. Rove urged tea party members to carefully police themselves and avoid being hijacked by wannabees who failed to get elected to party offices and Ron Paul supporters. (Is there any group that Ron Paul supporters haven’t tried to hijack?)

You may also be interested in the scene outside, particularly after the viral YouTube video of Rove’s book signing in Beverly Hills on Monday night, where an anti-war Code Pink protester tried to handcuff him as a war criminal. As you can see from this photo taken by Times reporter Jonathan Morales, the turnout wasn’t quite what Code Pink had hoped.

Here’s the link to my video from today’s interview with Rove.

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  • Mike F.

    Good video interview – lots of interesting insight from Rove. He’s a good sport to have allowed an interview with 3 reporters; seems most want to control it with 1 reporter.

    I’m perplexed that you decided to use the term “extremist” in connection with the TEA Party. I’ve seen no evidence to support the magnitude of this label, even if you deem it only to a segment of “members”. Most people involved in the movement aren’t part of a membership. They simply show up in support and conduct themselves non-violently and without hate speech.