Part of the Bay Area News Group

Fiorina blasts Recovery Act, Boxer in SF

By Josh Richman
Thursday, June 24th, 2010 at 12:32 pm in 2010 election, Barbara Boxer, Carly Fiorina, U.S. Senate.

Republican U.S. Senate nominee Carly Fiorina was in San Francisco this morning, holding a news conference outside a vacant office building to illustrate what she said is the failure of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act economic stimulus – and by extension, incumbent U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., who voted for the law.

Fiorina 6-17-10 in Sacramento (AP Photo)“As part of her Election Year rhetoric, Barbara Boxer has spent a lot of time touting the effectiveness of the economic ‘stimulus’ plan she championed. Meanwhile, more than 2.27 million Californians are out of work and unemployment has increased both statewide and here in San Francisco since the plan’s passage,” Fiorina said later Thursday in a news release. “The increasing amount of vacant office space in San Francisco is symptomatic of the jobs lost as a result of bad government policy championed by Barbara Boxer, and it underscores the economic stimulus plan’s abject failure to meet its stated goal: job creation.”

“I come from the real world, and I know that in the real world, economic growth starts with unleashing the talents and energies of California’s workers, small-business owners, innovators and entrepreneurs – not with bigger government,” she added. “It’s clear Barbara Boxer will not fight for policies that will stimulate real economic growth and private-sector job creation, and that’s why we must replace her this November.”

Boxer’s campaign responded by noting that ARRA brought San Francisco almost $625 million for 549 different projects, including 256 research grants totaling $117.8 million to the University of California San Francisco, credited with creating or retaining 568 jobs; $85.5 million for Muni transit infrastructure and maintenance, credited with creating or retaining 568 jobs; $17.9 million for the San Francisco Housing Authority to improve public housing, credited with creating or retaining 36 jobs; and $13.1 million for the San Francisco Unified School District to improve education for children with disabilities.

“Senator Barbara Boxer’s top priority is creating jobs and turning our economy around, and she has a specific plan to do this,” campaign spokeswoman Julie Wong said in an e-mail. “Her plan includes: creating thousands of clean energy jobs and making California the hub of the clean energy economy; ending tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas; cracking down on Wall Street speculation and instead lending to small businesses; investing in infrastructure and creating new jobs; and reducing the deficit.”

Fiorina has made earlier stops on her “statewide jobs tour” in San Diego, Clovis, Sacramento and Los Angeles; Boxer’s campaign has usually responded by pointing out the Recovery Act money that has flowed to those cities, and even sometimes to the very businesses hosting Fiorina’s events.

[You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.]

  • Mike

    Boxer loves to spend lots of our tax dollars and then wants more. I’m tired of her BS!!!!!!

    Bye bye Boxer!

  • Tom

    “I come from the real world”

    Hilarious!

  • Elwood

    Good old Baba Booboo!

    She never met a plan to spend our tax money that she didn’t like!

  • Elwood

    So, Tom, what’s your definition of the real world? Good old Baba Booboo with her snout in the public trough for decades?

    I don’t think so!

  • ted ford

    this will be a real “hold your nose while you vote” election. I really would have preferred Tom Campbell.

  • AlwaysThinking

    Boxer just proved the point Fiorina made – every “job” Boxer’s campaign hack pointed to in the response is in the public sector. Economic growth comes from the private sector!

  • Josh Richman

    AlwaysThinking: Blame me for this – the list that Boxer’s campaign sent did include several Recovery Act fund recipients in the private sector (although many of the public-sector grants later benefit private-sector contractors, too).

    Among the direct private-sector recipients are:

    Hathaway Dinwiddie Construction Co., which got $96 million to do maintenance, hazardous material abatement and other work at a federal building site, credited with creating or retaining 100 jobs for carpenters, laborers, security patrol officers, mechanics, plumbers and electricians;

    HKS Inc., an architectural firm that got $8 million to help develop a design for renovation of United Nations Plaza, which eventually should create or retain 46 jobs for architects, engineers and consultants;

    M. Arthur Gensler, Jr. & Associates, a San Francisco-based architectural firm that got $29.4 million to repair and improve a Hawaii federal building and courthouse, projected to create or retain 44 jobs for architects, designers, engineers, technicians, and support staff;

    Martin McNerney Properties LLC, which got $1.7 million to clean up a Third Street brownfield property contaminated with lead, credited with creating or retaining 22 jobs for foremen, operators, laborers, welders, oilers, and safety staff; and

    North East Medical Services, which got $1.6 million to expand health-education, pharmacy and lab services and to buy equipment, credited with creating or retaining 10 construction and support jobs.