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First all-woman delegation leads Contra Costa

By Lisa Vorderbrueggen
Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011 at 5:04 pm in Assembly District 15, California Assembly, women in politics.

For the first time in Contra Costa County history, all three of its representatives in the California Assembly are women.

That bucks state and national trends, where despite comprising slightly more than half the population, women make up less than a third of the California Legislature, 16 percent of the House of Representatives and 17 out of 100 members of the U.S. Senate.

I sat down in a Contra Costa Times conference room recently with Assemblywomen Nancy Skinner, of Berkeley; Susan Bonilla, of Concord; and Joan Buchanan, of Alamo, where we talked broadly about why women are underrepresented, how to encourage more women to seek public office and how women legislate differently than men.

Read a sampling here of what the women had to say or watch the full video below.

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  • RR, Uninvited Columnist

    Go easy on pushing women into politics. In California we’re likely to wind up with an updated version of She (Who Must Be Obeyed)

  • Karen Collings

    Are you kidding me ladies? There is a “glass ceiling for women in the democratic party???” Let’s see, both US Senators from Calif. are women, and oh, our Attorney General is a woman. Give me a break – you give us all a bad name when you whine and moan. Act like men for once and play the game, fight the tough fight, and stop complaining. Just once!

  • John W

    #2

    Yeah, tell ‘em to put their man pants on!

  • Ralph Hoffmann

    As I e-mailed you, Lisa … Joan replied with a thank you.

  • RR, Uninvited Columnist

    No. 4: Joan B. has said “Thank you” to me, too

  • John W

    Re: #4

    Not me, and I even voted for her. Was going to vote for Wilson, until he kissed Grover Norquist’s ring and showed he didn’t have a clue about his city manager’s compensation.

  • Ralph Hoffmann

    Gender des make a difference in Congress, State Legislatures, the Supreme Courts, and Corporate Boards of Directors. Imaging how different our Country would be if all those bodies had equal numbers of males and females.