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Swanson: Inmate release bumps food-stamp need

By Josh Richman
Wednesday, May 25th, 2011 at 9:33 am in Uncategorized.

Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding an order that California must release tens of thousands of inmates from its unconstitutionally overcrowded prisons is one more, big, new reason why some ex-cons should be eligible for food stamps, says Assemblyman Sandre Swanson.

Swanson, D-Alameda, is the author of AB 828, the Nutritional Assistance for Families Act, which would let people convicted of certain non-violent, drug-related felonies receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. Federal law bars certain former offenders from receiving such benefits, but lets states opt out of the ban; 14 states have eliminated the ban entirely, and 21 have modified it.

The Assembly on Monday voted 46-30 to pass the bill; it now goes to the state Senate.

“Nearly 46,000 prisoners will soon be released into our communities,” Swanson said in a news release. “Whether you are happy with this or not, the fact is that the state is about to absorb a huge population of ex-felons and we must be realistic about how to support them and their families as they attempt to transition back into society. If a person’s most critical needs are not met when they re-enter society after serving time in prison, they won’t have the tools necessary for a successful and safe return. Without basic support, such as food, many of them will return to criminal activity and drug use instead of gainful employment and sobriety.”

“I understand being hard on crime. I stand behind stricter penalties and fines for criminals. However, once a person has successfully served his sentence, he should have tools available to successfully reintegrate.”

Swanson noted California’s recidivism rate is at 70 percent, the nation’s highest, and most Californians would prefer their tax dollars to support education and job creation rather than housing and re-housing the same inmates over and over again.

“California’s restrictive policies are inhibiting its access to federal monies,” he said. “AB 828 will tap into these federal funds, which will ultimately support agriculture, increase sales tax revenue, reduce the state’s recidivism rate, and provide fundamental services to families at a time of dire need. Economists estimate that for every dollar of SNAP funds spent, the local economy receives $1.75 in return. During these times of unprecedented program cuts and joblessness, we cannot leave federal dollars on the table that would ultimately help stimulate our economy and increase public safety by helping communities safely absorb the 46,000 prisoners who may end up living as our neighbors.”

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed two similar bills by Swanson in 2007 and 2008. In the latter veto message, Schwarzenegger wrote that “extending food stamp eligibility to drug dealers or traffickers, upon the condition that they engage in drug treatment, will not ensure these individuals will stop selling or trafficking illegal drugs. Therefore, this bill does not provide a targeted approach to the right population and does not ensure adequate public safety protections.”

Swanson tried again last year, but the bill got held up in the Senate Appropriations suspense file and never made it to a floor vote. As the Assembly OKed it last May, Assemblyman Chuck DeVore, R-Irvine – then a GOP primary candidate for U.S. Senate – blasted the idea, saying “(g)iving felony-level drug dealers government funds with no strings attached undermines the very concept of holding them accountable for their actions. With just 12 percent of the nation’s population residing here, California is home to 32 percent of the welfare recipients in the United States. We should be encouraging Californians to become self-reliant, not enlarging the welfare rolls with convicted felons. Each dollar given to drug felons is a dollar that could go to an out of work family with children to care for.”

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  • Elwood

    Re: Swanson

    Bullpucky!

    If you can’t do the time, don’t do the crime.

  • Renee Sherrer

    Seems to me like the one we have to be worried about breaking laws and or ethical/moral short comings would be Schwarzenegger. WHAT happened to allowing someone who has paid their debt to society, starting with a clean slate. What is the point in sentences to fit the crime if once a person has been imprisoned, they will always be eliminated from possible success of becoming a tax-paying, contributing member of society. Because we’ve become accustomed to living in fear of just about any kind of “bogey man” one can imagine, we are a society which elects politicians who would constantly eliminate hope or upward mobility for those who need the most help.

    Also, it’s not just inmates they’re negating by refusing to support them in their release, it’s their families, their kids, their wives, and their fathers and mothers. We like to believe that we are a nation where anyone can succeed. But most people don’t want that possibility to be available to a released inmate. Guess what, they’re humans too. Maybe some of them won’t be successful in their reintegration. One inmate returning to prison is not the measure of the majority of them. But, in our society of fear, that’s what we want to believe. Let’s get some media coverage on the successfully reintegrated released inmates. Let’s CELEBRATE the possibility of recovery, reintegration, united families. Everyone assumes the worst. That kind of belief doesn’t lift anyone up. It only brings us all down.

  • RR, Senile Columnist

    M. Swanson is right. Let ex-offenders peddle food stamps not drugs.