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Term limits yield few ‘citizen’ lawmakers

By Lisa Vorderbrueggen
Thursday, July 21st, 2011 at 5:31 pm in Uncategorized.

Term limits was supposed to send average folks to California’s Capitol, a return to the old days when lawmakers periodically traveled to Sacramento,  passed a few laws and then returned to their farms and law firms where they earned an honest living.

But the popular restriction has utterly failed to produce these “citizen” lawmakers, according to a solid new study from the Center for Governmental Studies.

“Instead, the state has witnessed an enhanced form of political chairs, in which termed out state legislators simply move to other state or local political offices,” wrote CGS analyst Ava Alexandar. “Indeed, politicians are now moving faster and faster to the music, shifting their political offices to keep up with the pace of politics in California’s post term limits world and continue to serve in public office.”

Most legislators don’t return to their old jobs but instead run for another office, seek a political appointment or work as a lobbyist or other government-related position, Alexandar found.

Read “Citizen Legislators or Political Musical Chairs: Term Limits in California” here.

California voters like term limits and the issue has long been considered inviolate. They smacked down a 2008  measure that would have modified term limits but allowed incumbents to hang around a little longer.

A new measure has qualified for the ballot that would permit legislators to serve 12 years in either the Assembly or the Senate, compared with current restrictions that limit legislators to six years in the Assembly and eight years in the Senate. It contains no provisions for incumbents, which was the primary reason the 2008 bill failed.

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  • Elwood

    The pigs just change places at the trough.

  • John W

    I still say merge the 80 Assembly and 40 Senate seats into a 120 member unicameral legislature. Then blow up about 80% of those boards and commissions boxes. Pretty soon, there will be fewer chairs among which to circulate. I don’t believe in term limits anymore than in supermajority requirements to pass stuff. It’s pretty stupid when you have freshman and sophomore legislators chairing committees and serving in the top leadership posts.