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Brown vetoes fines for failing to report gun thefts

By Josh Richman
Friday, September 28th, 2012 at 2:49 pm in Anthony Portantino, Assembly, California State Senate, gun control, Jerry Brown, Mark DeSaulnier.

Besides extending the state’s “open carry” ban to long guns, Gov. Jerry Brown signed or vetoed several other firearms bills today as well.

Brown vetoed SB 1366 by state Sen. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Concord, which would’ve made it an infraction – or, on the third offense, a misdemeanor – to fail to report to police the theft of a firearm within 48 hours of the time the owner knew or reasonably should have known the weapon was lost or stolen.

“The proponents urge that the bill will improve identification of gun traffickers and help law enforcement disarm people prohibited from possessing firearms. I am not convinced,” the governor wrote in his veto message. “For the most part, responsible people report the loss or theft of a firearm and irresponsible people do not. I am skeptical that this bill would change those behaviors.”

Brown also vetoed AB 2460 by Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento, which would’ve restricted law enforcement and military personnel from selling lawfully purchases handguns that haven’t been certified by the Attorney General’s Office.

“This bill takes from law enforcement officers the right to an activity that remains legally available to every private citizen,” he wrote in the veto message. “I don’t believe this is justified.”

Brown signed AB 1559 by Assemblyman Anthony Portantino, D-Pasadena, which will let California filmmakers use certain weapons in their productions and reduce fees for multiple gun purchases by eliminating double or even triple fees for gun purchases made at the same date and time.

He also signed SB 1367 by state Sen. Jean Fuller, R-Bakersfield, which revises archery provisions so an active or retired peace officer can carry a concealed firearm while engaged in taking deer with bow and arrow, but prohibits taking or attempting to take deer with that firearm.

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  • Bruce R. Peterson, Lafayette

    Mark DeSalnier’s latest attempt to find another way to take money from people failed. Good! I will be supporting his opponent Mark Meuser this election.

  • JohnW

    An infraction or third-offense misdemeanor is hardly a serious deterrent to trafficking via unreported thefts. Also, this can’t be addressed at the state level. However, every illegally possessed gun (a) started out as a legal sale and (b) is highly likely to be used in a crime.

    If I were King, anybody would be subject to serious civil and criminal charges for any crime committed with a gun so long as that gun is still registered to them — unless the gun has been reported stolen in a timely fashion. So, if somebody purchases and registers a gun in Georgia, and the gun is later used in a holdup in Oakland, the person who bought the gun in Georgia could be nailed, unless the gun had been reported stolen. Anybody repeatedly reporting stolen guns to avoid liability would be investigated and likely prosecuted for trafficking.

  • RR, Senile Columnist

    Long guns banned? What would Daniel Boone say?