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Kiss your bipartisan immigration reform goodbye

By Josh Richman
Friday, September 20th, 2013 at 11:45 am in Immigration, U.S. House, Zoe Lofgren.

Two House Republicans have quit the “Group of Seven” that was working on a comprehensive immigration reform bill. Reps. John Carter and Sam Johnson, both of Texas, issued this joint statement this morning:

“For nearly four years, we have been committed to finding a real solution to the serious immigration problem that plagues America. We have been working diligently and in good faith with our Democratic colleagues in a serious effort to fix our broken immigration system and secure our borders once and for all.

John Carter“From the beginning, we knew that solving the immigration problem wouldn’t be easy, but we owe it to the American people to come up with a real, long-term solution that instills accountability into the system and rewards personal responsibility. So we rolled up our sleeves and set aside partisan politics to do what is right for our country.

“After years of hard work and countless meetings, we have reached a tipping point and can no longer continue working on a broad approach to immigration. We want to be clear. The problem is politics. Instead of doing what’s right for America, President Obama time and again has unilaterally disregarded the U.S. Constitution, the letter of the law and bypassed the Congress – the body most representative of the people – in order to advance his political agenda. We will not tolerate it. Laws passed by Congress are not merely suggestions, regardless of the current atmosphere in Washington. Laws are to be respected and followed by all – particularly by the Commander-in-Chief.

“Starting off with the President’s hallmark legislation – the Affordable Care Act (ACA) – ObamaCare. The Obama administration has changed, waived or delayed key provisions with a single stroke of a pen. Congress opposed new laws that would infringe on Americans’ Constitutional right to keep and bear arms, but the President resorted to executive fiat to curtail those rights. Congress rejected the President’s cap and trade bill, yet he issued rules to reduce Americans’ access to our own energy resources that would help make us energy independent. The administration’s practice of hand-picking what parts of laws they wish to enforce has irrevocably damaged our efforts of fixing our broken immigration system.

“If past actions are the best indicators of future behavior; we know that any measure depending on the president’s enforcement will not be faithfully executed. It would be gravely irresponsible to further empower this administration by granting them additional authority or discretion with a new immigration system. The bottom line is – the American people do not trust the President to enforce laws, and we don’t either.

Sam Johnson“We have not given up and are committed to getting this right. That’s why we will continue to support efforts from our Republican colleagues in the U.S. House of Representatives. That means immigration reform that starts with a genuinely secure border, full implementation of E-verify, affective enforcement of current and future laws, and a commitment that any proposal contributes to a healthy economy. There is a way to fix this problem that will instill the authentic accountability that has been missing in immigration for the past 25 years. The American people deserve no less.

“We are proud of the bipartisan team that worked with us on the immigration reform effort. We are honored to have worked closely with Democrat Representative Zoe Lofgren, Luis Gutierrez, John Yarmuth, and Xavier Becerra. We are also proud of our Republican colleagues Representative Mario Diaz-Balart and Raul Labrador.”

Here’s a response from Lofgren, D-San Jose, the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee, said this morning:

“The dance of legislation is intricate and unpredictable. For the last four-and-a-half years a bipartisan group of representatives met, at first in anonymity, and later openly, to attempt to craft a bipartisan immigration reform bill.

“We did succeed in crafting a bill, but at this point my Republican colleagues, Congressmen Sam Johnson and John Carter, have decided to withdraw from this process. While these two very conservative Congressmen do not agree with me on many issues, I am sure that they would agree that our efforts during these last several years were characterized by mutual respect and serious legislative work. Solid work was put into crafting immigration measures and these efforts, or portions of them, may yet help the process as efforts continue to achieve top to bottom reform of our country’s broken immigration system.

“The question isn’t whether we can pass immigration reform. The economic, security and moral arguments have been made for reform. In poll after poll a growing majority of Americans want to see immigration reform, and the votes exist in the House for reform.

“In the end, it’s the Republican leadership that must make a decision on whether they intend to allow the current broken immigration system to continue as it is, or whether they will allow the House to vote on reform. I continue to be hopeful that Republican leaders will schedule votes on serious reform measures that aren’t host to known poison pills. It can be done. Let’s hope Congress can perform this basic task.”

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  • Willis James

    Here is my question for California leaders.

    If we pass a variation of the Senate Gang of Eight bill that I’m sure Lofgren supports, what will happen to the recently passed California Legislature

    “TRUST Act anti-deportation legislation”

    If we pass comprehensive immigration reform which includes the January 1st 2012 cutoff date what will the Democratic Party leaders do about the provision in the bill that calls for the deportation of all those who arrive AFTER that 1/1/2012 date or come in future years.

    When local police and sheriffs detain them, will California say you can’t work with ICE and report them?

    In other words, part of any compromise is for those who ask for it must agree to enforce the provisions in the bill.

    Even those parts they would prefer to be different.

    If the California legislative leadership isn’t even willing to enforce all the provisions of the Senate Gang of Eight immigration reform bill, then why should we even believe anything.

    Has anyone asked our local legislators is they will repeal the TRUST Act anti-deportation legislation AFTER comprehensive immigration reform is passed?
    I suspect that most groups pleading for the passage of the Senate Gang of Eight bill, would following its passage, immediately begin to resist its implementation when it comes to the deportation of future arrivals.
    1986 immigration reform revisited.
    Little to no enforcement to go along with the high minded words.
    Any wonder we question legislation?