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CA17: Honda’s busy schedule of local events

By Josh Richman
Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014 at 11:40 am in 2014 primary, Mike Honda, U.S. House.

With six weeks to go before June’s primary election, Rep. Mike Honda is keeping his profile high in his 17th Congressional District with a busy schedule of official events.

Honda, D-San Jose, is making the best of his seven-term incumbent bully pulpit as challengers Ro Khanna and Vanila Singh step up the pace of their campaigns.

honda.jpgOn Tuesday evening, Honda will visit the Bill Wilson Center in San Jose to talk with several young homeless people with mental-health issues who are part of the center’s Transition Age Youth program. “It is crucial that we understand the needs and challenges facing homeless youth here in Silicon Valley,” he said in a news release. “We live in an area of great opportunity, and we are obligated to ensure that opportunity is available for all residents of Silicon Valley.”

On Wednesday, Honda will give the keynote address at the Housing Trust Silicon Valley‘s investor briefing in Santa Clara, speaking to more than 400 business leaders, Housing Trust partners, housing industry professionals, community partners, and the general public about the importance of affordable housing for businesses, workers and low-income residents.

On Thursday morning, Honda will join local elected officials, community leaders and public health officials in San Jose to announce the launch of a bus ad campaign urging Chinese- and Vietnamese-American residents to get tested for hepatitis B. The Asian American Pacific Islander community accounts for over half of all chronic hepatitis B cases, and half of the deaths related to hepatitis B; Honda will discuss how Congress is working to address and eradicate hepatitis, including the work of the bipartisan Congressional Hepatitis Caucus, which he founded and co-chairs.

Last week, Honda held a news conference in San Jose to announce his introduction of H.R. 4460, the Freedom of Faith Act, which would make permanent the immigrant provision for religious workers who are non-ministers; the current religious workers program will expire in 2015. “For over two decades, Congress has reauthorized this program time and time again,” he said. “It’s time we do what’s right for our communities of faith and make permanent this program that allows workers who lead worship, officiate events, and offer pastoral care, to receive temporary visas like ministers and faith leaders do.”

Honda also last week gave the opening address at the San Francisco Bay Area Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Nanotechnology Council’s 10th Anniversary symposium in Santa Clara, discussing the continuing importance of nanotech in our economy, as well as his role in enacting the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act. The law, of which Honda was an original co-sponsor, first authorized $4 billion in federal spending over 4 years for the National Nanotechnology Initiative in 2003.

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