CA17: Honda attacks Khanna’s ‘usual suspects’

With Ro Khanna about to launch his second campaign to unseat Rep. Mike Honda on Saturday, Honda’s campaign has fired a shot across his bow – a website taking potshots at Khanna’s deep-pocketed campaign contributors, including some of Silicon Valley’s most successful investors and executives.

The RosUsualSuspects.com page seems to revive many of the attacks that Honda, D-San Jose, leveled last year against his Democratic challenger during the ugly 17th Congressional District race. Honda won an eighth term by 3.6 percentage points.

honda.jpg“The Honda campaign will be aggressively reminding voters who is behind the obscene amounts of money that the challenger will raise and spend in his continued pursuit of power,” Adam Alberti, a spokesperson for Honda’s campaign, said in a statement issued Thursday afternoon.

“Ro Khanna’s style-over-substance brand of politics combined with the backing of big money is a threat to the democratic process, and if successful will come at a cost to the great many members of our community who have been excluded from the tech boom and are struggling to provide for their families,” Alberti continued. “Congressman Honda believes in representing the entire district, not just the top 1 percent who have benefited most from our economy.”

But Khanna issued a statement later Thursday afternoon saying “attacks like this are precisely why we need new ideas in Washington.”

“This is what people do in Washington – they try to score political points with dubious guilt-by-association tactics, rather than working together to get things done,” he said. “I prefer to spend my time fighting for good paying local jobs and trying to make our community a better place, rather than engaging in political bickering.”

Khanna vowed to “campaign on ideas to elevate the debate. I hope Mike Honda will offer more than the same tired old Washington attacks.”

Much of what’s on the page is similar to a Honda campaign television ad we dissected last October, and merits explanation and/or refutation.

John Arnold, the “Power Broker” who used to work at Enron, and his wife gave $350,000 last year to Californians for Innovation, a super PAC that spent almost $776,000 on Khanna’s behalf. Arnold also has contributed to the campaigns of President Barack Obama; U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va.; U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.; Rep. Ami Bera, D-Elk Grove; and dozens of other Democratic candidates and committees.

Republican ex-Congressman Ernie Konnyu did try to get the Tea Party Express to spend $50,000 to support Khanna, but he was unsuccessful in convincing it to do so – so calling Khanna “their candidate” seems disingenuous at best.

Marc Leder – the Florida hedge fund executive who hosted the fundraiser at which Mitt Romney made his infamous “47 percent” comment, and who gave Romney and affiliated groups more than a half-million dollars – did contribute $5,200 to Khanna’s campaign last year and has given $5,400 this year. But if that makes Khanna less of a Democrat, you’d have to say the same about U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J.; Rep. Joe Kennedy, D-Mass.; and Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla. – all of whom have accepted Leder’s contributions.

And although Khanna’s donor list does include some executives “who would profit by cutting wages and outsourcing U.S. jobs” and “strongly opposed increasing the minimum wage to ensure fair pay for families in our region,” Khanna – a former Obama Commerce Department appointee – repeatedly has spoken against offshoring jobs and in favor of raising the minimum wage. Likewise, Peter Thiel supports Social Security privatization but Khanna does not.

Khanna raised $801,000 in the first quarter of this year, mostly after C-SPAN aired footage of Honda seeming to doze off during a Feb. 27 House floor debate on homeland security funding. Honda raised $258,000 in the first quarter.

Josh Richman

Josh Richman covers state and national politics for the Bay Area News Group. A New York City native, he earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and reported for the Express-Times of Easton, Pa. for five years before coming to the Oakland Tribune and ANG Newspapers in 1997. He is a frequent guest on KQED Channel 9’s “This Week in Northern California;” a proud father; an Eagle Scout; a somewhat skilled player of low-stakes poker; a rather good cook; a firm believer in the use of semicolons; and an unabashed political junkie who will never, EVER seek elected office.

  • RRSenileColumnist

    Ro’s spot in the BHO adm. didn’t give him much of a boost in his previous races. What did he do at Commerce? Empty the wastebaskets?

  • JohnW

    Aside from the question of whether RoK would be a good replacement, Honda really ought to hang it up after this term. That video of sleeping during debate on Homeland Security funding could be lethal in a TV campaign spot.

  • Willis James

    Mike Honda is 73, yet already seems like a old man.
    Compare him to Jerry Brown, who is 77

    In every way, Honda is less vital, fit, and “awake”.
    The idea of him representing the heart of Silicon Valley is absurd.
    If he runs again, he will be 77 before he finishes the next term.

    Even nice guys need to be replaced when they lose their vitality.

  • Elwood

    There’s not enough coffee in the world to keep me awake during some congressional debates I’ve seen.

    Watching grass grow is more stimulating.

  • Elwood

    When I consider such hare brained schemes as the giant Delta draining twin bores and the semi-high speed choo choo to nowhere I question Brown’s sanity.

  • JohnW

    A form of drone warfare!

  • JohnW

    The bores don’t add one more drop of water supply to the state. It would be cheaper and more effective to hire Uber drivers to haul water from Lake Michigan.