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Judge poised to nix attack on ‘top-two’ primary

California can proceed with its new “top-two” primary system, an East Bay judge tentatively ruled today, sustaining the state’s objection to a lawsuit filed by a group of minor parties and their voters.

In his tentative ruling, Alameda County Superior Court Judge Larry Appel said the arguments made in the lawsuit filed last fall are the same ones that failed to convince the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal and the U.S. Supreme Court that Washington’s version of the law should be overturned.

A hearing on the tentative ruling is scheduled for 9 a.m. Tuesday in Oakland.

The lawsuit, filed in November on behalf of the Green Party of Alameda County, the Libertarian Party of California, the Peace and Freedom Party of California and eight minor-party voters, argues Prop. 14 “effectively denies voters their fundamental right of choice by precluding small party candidates from the general election ballot,” thus violating the First and 14th amendments.

The general election is “the moment when the highest number of voters are engaged in the electoral process,” the suit says, and so the new law severely burdens voters’, candidates’ and parties’ rights without any compelling or even significant state interest.

But Appel wrote Monday that unless the plaintiffs can amend their complaint in the next few weeks to present new arguments, the system will stand.

Appel said the first part of the lawsuit seems to be a “facial challenge” to Prop. 14 – challenging the general framework – rather than an “as applied” challenge that questions some manner in which the new law is being implemented in a discriminatory or unreasonable way.

But the 9th Circuit earlier this year “considered and rejected the same broad challenge” that the plaintiffs are making in this case, the judge wrote. “Among other things, the Court held that ‘because [the law] gives major- and minor-party candidates equal access to the primary and general election ballots, it does not give the “established parties a decided advantage over any new parties struggling for existence.”’”

Arguing that participation in the general election isn’t equivalent to participation in the primary election; that general-election ballot access is essential for minor parties seeking to qualify in future elections; and that California doesn’t have sufficient regulatory interests to impose this new system “are legal assertions that are inconsistent” with the 9th Circuit’s ruling in the Washington case, Appel wrote.

And Appel wrote that the U.S. Supreme Court in 2008 held that a statute like Washington’s – and now, like Prop. 14 – that allows an open primary in which candidates identify themselves on the ballot by a self-designated party preference doesn’t unconstitutionally interfere with a political party’s rights of association or speech.

Michael Siegel, the plaintiffs’ attorney, said Monday he’s disappointed that Appel deferred to a 9th Circuit ruling that the plaintiffs have argued was in error. “Big picture, this is something that needs to get sorted out at a higher level, either at the California Supreme Court or the U.S. Supreme Court,” Siegel said.

Siegel acknowledged that even if he were to convince Appel at tomorrow’s hearing to completely reverse this tentative ruling, “nothing could be done in terms of the June election, but something could be done for November” – that is, if the court struck down the top-two system, it could let minor parties hold conventions this summer or fall to nominate candidates for addition to the general-election ballot.

But given Appel’s tentative ruling, Siegel said, “practically speaking, what’s really at stake now is 2014.”

UPDATE @ 4:06 P.M. TUESDAY: Appel heard arguments on his tentative ruling this morning and took the case under submission; he’ll probably file a permanent order – most likely along the lines of his tentative ruling – in the next few days. The next hearing in the case has been scheduled for July 10.

Posted on Monday, April 9th, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, 2012 Congressional Election, 2012 primary election, 2012 State Senate election, 2012 U.S. Senate election | 14 Comments »

Endorsement tiff causes county-state GOP rift

The members of the Tehama County Republican Central Committee are miffed enough at state GOP chairman Tom Del Beccaro over an endorsement spat that they’ve rescinded their invitation for him to keynote one of their upcoming events.

Oh no they di’int!

Ah, but they did, and now they’re telling the world. County GOP chairman Ken Say reached out to reporters today to announce that Del Beccaro, of Lafayette, is no longer welcome to speak at the fundraising banquet they’re holding in May in Red Bluff. From his letter to Del Beccaro:

After serious discussion of the endorsement actions taken by the California Republican Party Board of Directors during their March 11th meeting, the Tehama County Republican Party has unanimously voted to rescind the invitation extended to you to be our guest speaker at the TCRP dinner of May 19, 2012. The TCRP, by unanimous vote, has affirmed that our speaker must be someone that upholds our adherence to Republican values and principles. Unfortunately, we no longer believe that you meet that criteria and have voted to invite speakers that the TCRP believe to meet that standard.

We realize that you are only one vote on the Board, but your personal leadership in the CRP Board endorsement process has convinced us that you were unable to guide the Board in adhering to the Board’s own bylaws. The specific bylaw violation was the invalidation of Tehama County’s February 9th endorsement of Assembly candidate, Tehama County Supervisor Bob Williams, which then allowed the CRP Board to disregard the clear requirement of a non-endorsement by the Board in Section 3.02 of the bylaws. The TCRP believes that their endorsements were invalidated by the CRP Board because it did not fit conveniently with the candidates that you wanted to support and we resent that CRP funds will be used to only support your candidates.

We are making our displeasure of the Board’s and your action public to let the other Republican County Central Committees know that the CRP’s leadership has placed their own interests above the individual interests of the local Republican voters as expressed by their duly-elected central committee members. We clearly understand the reason for the alienation that many California Republicans feel toward the State Party.

We, the Tehama County Republican Party, at the local level, will continue to support the Republican candidates that represent our best interests and not some unknown person picked by a “star chamber” in an illegal procedure.

The state GOP endorsed incumbent Assemblyman Dan Logue, R-Linda, in the 3rd Assembly District, rather than Williams. Logue, 61, now seeking his third and final two-year Assembly term, is the Assembly Republican Caucus’ chief whip and is the top Republican on the Health and Elections and Redistricting committees; earlier, he was a Yuba County supervisor.

Del Beccaro, responding by e-mail this afternoon, said the party “engaged in an unprecedented process in response to the challenge of Prop. 14” – that is, the new top-two primary system, in which all voters can choose from among all candidates regardless of party and the top-two vote getters advance to November’s general election, even if they’re from the same party.

“In the end, the overwhelming majority of decisions the Party made were well received,” Del Beccaro said. “There were exceptions – proving the adage that you cannot please everyone, especially in politics. Going forward the Party will move toward a more broad based process that will engage Republicans voters directly.”

Another source close to the GOP endorsement process called this little more than a case of sour grapes. “The CRP didn’t go their way on the endorsement process, and quite honestly, it is just silliness. We have 58 counties in California, and made some 154 … endorsements without this sort of letter. I chalk it up to that.”

More than half of the newly drawn 3rd Assembly District’s registered voters are in Butte County; it also includes parts of Sutter, Tehama, Yuba, Glenn and Colusa counties. About 40.7 percent of the district’s registered voters are Republicans, about 32.9 percent are Democrats and about 20.2 percent declined to state a party preference.

UPDATE @ 5:07 P.M.: Former California Republican Party Chairman Ron Nehring just replied to my tweet of this item with a tweet of his own: “A chairman often takes grief for events beyond his control. @tomdelbeccaro acted properly.”

Posted on Tuesday, March 27th, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, Republican Party, Republican politics | 3 Comments »

Money race for open East Bay Assembly seats

The East Bay’s open-seat Assembly races are seeing some fierce financial competition, according to campaign finance reports due yesterday.

In the 18th Assembly District, Alameda Vice Mayor Rob Bonta, a Democrat, raised the most from Jan. 1 through March 17 – $76,066.30 – and has loaned his own campaign $7,500; spent $94,323.96 during that period; and had $142,087.82 cash on hand as of March 17. Peralta Community College District Trustee Abel Guillen of Oakland, another Democrat, raised $64,929.24 and has loaned his campaign $13,650; spent $43,991.95; and had $132,944 cash on hand as of March 17. And AC Transit Director-at-Large Joel Young of Oakland raised $32,645.00 and has loaned his campaign $50,000; spent $42,566.85; and had $161,919.94 cash on hand as of March 17. I couldn’t find any fundraising by Rhonda Weber of Alameda, that race’s sole Republican.

In the 20th Assembly District, Hayward Councilman Bill Quirk, a Democrat, raised $32,174.70 and has loaned his campaign $96,000; spent $40,916.18; and had $130,435.08 cash on hand as of March 17. Hayward optometrist Jennifer Ong, another Democrat, raised $33,699.00 and has loaned her campaign $48,100; spent $119,021.85; and had $91,266.06 cash on hand as of March 17. I couldn’t find any fundraising by New Haven Unified School District Trustee Sarabjit Cheema, a Democrat; Hayward Councilman Luis Reynoso, a Republican; or Union City Mayor Mark Green, a nonpartisan candidate.

In the 11th Assembly District, Oakley Councilman Jim Frazier, a Democrat, raised $58,008 and has loaned his own campaign $2,500; spent $91,901; and had $90,543.67 cash on hand as of March 17. Union negotiator Patricia Hernandez of Rio Vista, also a Democrat, raised $19,866.56; spent $34,991.11; and had $15,614.53 cash on hand as of March 17. Retired fire chief Gene Gantt of Vacaville, another Democrat, raised $14,570 and has loaned his own campaign $3,000; spent $26,941.89; and had $16,142.19 cash on hand as of March 17. Suisun City Vice Mayor Mike Hudson, a Republican, raised $40,078.19, spent $40,763.95 and had $594.10 cash on hand as of March 17. Former Vacaville Mayor Len Augustine, a nonpartisan candidate, raised $19,488.99, spent $6,291.50 and had $13,547.49 cash on hand as of March 17. I couldn’t find any fundraising by Democrat Charles Kingeter, a programmer from Suisun City.

Posted on Friday, March 23rd, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, Assembly, California Assembly, campaign finance | No Comments »

AD 18 brawl erupts over SEIU’s ‘un-endorsement’

We don’t tend to get excited about unions endorsing Democratic candidates, but when a union later revokes that endorsement, our ears perk up.

That’s exactly what happened to Joel Young, a candidate in the 18th Assembly District, who had gained the Service Employees International Union of California’s endorsement only to then lose it.

Actually, SEIU California in early February had endorsed all three Democrats in the 18th District race: Young, who is an AC Transit director; Alameda Vice Mayor Rob Bonta; and Peralta Community Colleges Trustee Abel Guillen. (Republican Rhonda Weber also is in the race.) But SEIU California’s board unanimously voted at the end of last month to revoke the endorsement from Young.

Here’s what’s not in dispute: Young somehow obtained parts of the endorsement questionnaires that Bonta and Guillen had filled out – papers meant for the union’s eyes only. He was showing around his opponents’ pledges not to take money from JobsPAC, a political action committee co-chaired by the California Chamber of Commerce – a pledge he never made.

Here’s what is in dispute: Young’s motivation.

Joel Young“It’s my understanding that after making a pledge not to seek money from JobsPAC or members of JobsPAC, they are indeed doing that,” Young said Thursday of Bonta and Guillen. “I realize that it’s common in our politics to talk out of both sides of our mouth, but that doesn’t make it right. Both Abel and Rob have made pledges to people in this community and it’s wrong for them to go against those pledges in Sacramento.”

“I was happy that the locals voted to support me and naturally disappointed that their vote was overridden. But that’s none of my business, that’s an SEIU issue,” he said. “While I would love to have had SEIU’s support, I remain committed to giving SEIU my support if I am elected.”

Other sources, however, said Young is putting a respectable spin on a disrespectful act – they say he used the union’s confidential information to solicit money from, and badmouth his opponents with, more conservative interests hostile to the union. As someone close to the union’s deliberations put it, “It’s uncommon for someone to accept an endorsement with one hand and then use the issues we care about as a bludgeon with the other hand.”

SEIU California Communications Director Michael Cox said Thursday he wouldn’t get into the details.

“Our local unions did not take lightly the decision to rescind Mr. Young’s endorsement. His actions violated the integrity of our member-driven, democratic endorsement process,” Cox said. “Unfortunately, his representations here are not accurate and are of a piece with the behavior that led to the withdrawal of our endorsement.”

Philemon Abraham, Bonta’s campaign coordinator, would say only that “Rob is a very principled candidate, and that’s why he earned and maintains strong support from SEIU.”

And Pat Dennis, Guillen’s campaign spokesman, said Young “needs to learn to live with the consequences of his actions. Despite Joel Young’s spin, the members of SEIU spoke with one voice and took this unprecedented action.”

Rumor has it the Alameda Labor Council will be weighing in on this next week. Stay tuned.

Posted on Thursday, March 15th, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, Assembly | 4 Comments »

State GOP endorses Emken for U.S. Senate

The California Republican Party today endorsed Elizabeth Emken of Danville over several other GOP contenders to unseat U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.

Elizabeth Emken“This was a humbling experience and a tremendous honor to receive the unanimous support of the board,” she said Monday. “I’m looking forward to the challenge ahead, as well as working in partnership with the CRP as we head toward victory together.”

As many as half a dozen other Republicans are in the race against Feinstein, including Oceanside businessman Dan Hughes and Santa Monica businessman Al Ramirez.

Chris Mann, Ramirez’ campaign manager, said his camp is “disappointed that the Board of the California Republican Party voted to support a candidate we believe cannot be successful against Feinstein. Fortunately this race will be decided by the voters, not the GOP establishment.” He said Ramirez is best-positioned to appeal to Latinos and independents, which will be crucial blocs in order to beat Feinstein.

The party in the past hasn’t made primary election endorsements, but state’s new “top-two” primary system necessitated a change. In this system, all voters choose from among all candidates regardless of party, and the top two vote getters advance to November’s general election – even if they’re of the same party.

State GOP leaders met yesterday in Burbank to consider how county committees had judged races all over the state, and then voted on decisions of their own. A list of endorsements in races all over the state was released Monday morning.

“As the Party prepares to be a vigorous contender in California’s first top two primary, we seek to promote the most competitive candidates in the field this primary season,” state GOP Chairman Tom Del Beccaro said in a news release. “As Chairman, I am very pleased with the level of thoughtful participation from around the state. It was an encouraging prelude to an invigorated Party getting ready for this important election year.”

Absent from the endorsement list was the 3rd Congressional District, where three Republicans are vying to unseat Rep. John Garamendi, D-Walnut Grove. Colusa County Supervisor Kim Vann has been named a “Young Gun” by the National Republican Congressional Committee, but neither she nor either of the other two Republicans in that race – Eugene Ray and Rick Tubbs – got a nod today from the state party.

Ricky Gill, another NRCC “Young Gun” in Northern California, did get the state party’s endorsement in his bid to unseat Rep. Jerry McNerney, D-Pleasanton, in the 9th Congressional District; Republican John McDonald also is in that race.

Gill said Monday he’s “proud to have earned the endorsement of the California Republican Party and of all three county parties in the 9th Congressional District. I also know, however, that our task is just beginning, and I’ll keep working hard to ensure our Valley and Delta communities send a truly local voice to Congress in 2012.”

The party also made no endorsements in the 18th Assembly District, where Republican Rhonda Weber is running, or in the 20th District, where Republican Luis Reynoso is running. However, Mike Hudson did get the state party’s endorsement in the 11th Assembly District, and Al Philips got it in the 16th Assembly District.

Posted on Monday, March 12th, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, 2012 Congressional Election, 2012 State Senate election, 2012 U.S. Senate election, Dianne Feinstein, Jerry McNerney, John Garamendi, Republican Party, Republican politics, U.S. House, U.S. Senate | 2 Comments »

Scandal can’t slow Assembly fundraising

Even a key supporter’s scandal can’t slow the hustle and bustle of a contested campaign.

Alameda County Supervisor Nadia Lockyer – now in rehabilitation for undisclosed addictions after a former lover allegedly attacked her in a Newark motel room early this month – and her husband, state Treasurer Bill Lockyer, had been scheduled to hold a fundraiser tonight at their home for Hayward Councilman Bill Quirk, who’s running for the 20th Assembly District seat.

Quirk, who’s tight enough with the Lockyers that he served as the treasurer for Nadia Lockyer’s 2010 supervisorial campaign, emailed supporters Sunday to announce that the event – for which tickets cost from $50 to $1,000 – had been moved to an Italian restaurant in Oakland Hayward. (My apologies; I frequent Buon Appetito myself, and misstating the city was a careless error on my part.) “Nadia and Bill Lockyer will have an event at their home sometime in the spring,” Quirk wrote.

You’ve got to wonder whether that’s wishful thinking, given that family’s unfortunate disarray.

As Quirk competes with Democrats Jennifer Ong and Sarabjit Cheema and independent Mark Green (while Republican Adnan Shahab has dropped out) in this top-two primary, the fundraising beat goes on even in districts with incumbents.

Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan, D-Alamo, is still calling for RSVPs to her wine-and-hors-d’oeuvres reception with Assembly Speaker John Perez, D-Los Angeles, next Tuesday, March 6 at Alamo’s Round Hill Country Club. Tickets start at $50 while a “leader” package of 10 tickets plus signage and special acknowledgement costs $3,900, all going to buoy Buchanan’s bid for a third and final Assembly term serving the newly drawn 16th District. Among her challengers will be Republican David Haubert of Dublin.

UPDATE @ 5:30 P.M.: Per the comments below, I neglected to mention Estes Albert “Al” Phillips of Livermore as a Republican contender in the 16th Assembly District. I’d noticed a statement-of-intent in the Secretary of State’s database under the name Estes Phillips, but didn’t know he goes by Al and so couldn’t find his campaign’s website earlier. My apologies.

Posted on Tuesday, February 28th, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, Assembly, campaign finance, Joan Buchanan, John Perez | 5 Comments »

GOP candidates sign up for ‘Trailblazer’ program

As House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield, prepares to take the podium at the California Republican Party convention’s banquet in Bakersfield, a news release has just gone out announcing that 33 GOP candidates have enrolled in his “California Trailblazers” legislative recruitment, training and advisement program.

The program is modeled on the National Republican Congressional Committee’s “Young Guns” program McCarthy founded for House candidates.

“As Republicans we see this election as an opportunity to embark on an economic comeback for both America and California,” McCarthy said in the news release. “Also, as Republicans we’re ready to begin the California Republican comeback. I believe that the Trailblazers program is essential to this effort. The Trailblazers program will work to find and give needed resources to principled reform-minded Republicans who are ready to bring fiscal discipline back to Sacramento, and economic growth and job creation back to California. I am proud to be a part of this effort.”

State Senate Republican Leader Bob Huff said in the release that the threat of a Democratic super-majority makes it “more important than ever to put our best team on the field this November. The rigorous training these candidates will go through will prepare them to win and fight for a fiscally conservative agenda in Sacramento.”

And Assembly Republican Leader Connie Conway called it “a terrific way to train Republicans to become stronger candidates and arrive in Sacramento ready to lead”

Once candidates meet campaign infrastructure, grassroots support, fundraising and other metrics specific to their races, they will advance to “Pathfinder,” “Rising Star,” and ultimately “Trailblazer.” The program also will provide ongoing education through fundraisers, coalition-building experts, media training and issue briefings. A preliminary campaign college for candidates was held in December, California Trailblazers in April will announce the candidates who have graduated to “Pathfinder” status.

Posted on Friday, February 24th, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, 2012 State Senate election, Assembly, California State Senate, Connie Conway | 2 Comments »

Endorsements and money in AD-18 race

The fight for the 18th Assembly District seat rolled onward today with dueling endorsement announcements.

Alameda Vice Mayor Rob Bonta got the endorsement of United Farm Workers co-founder Dolores Huerta, a labor icon. Peralta Community College District Trustee Abel Guillen rolled out his nods from Oakland City Councilmembers Nancy Nadel and Ignacio De La Fuente. And Guillen and AC Transit Board Director-at-Large Joel Young both tweeted today that they won the endorsement of Teamsters Joint Council 7.

But while endorsements can make a good media splash, it’s questionable how much weight they’re given by voters. For myself, I’m more interested in following the money – so I briefly eyeballed the three candidates’ campaign bankrolls today. Each is, in some way, a direct product of the elected offices they’re already holding.

Bonta’s campaign had $132,239.62 cash on hand at the end of 2011, including $7,500 he loaned to it himself. Among the contributions he has received are $7,800 from the Alameda Firefighters Association PAC; $3,900 from Assemblywoman Fiona Ma’s campaign committee; $2,000 from Oakland City Attorney’s Office Supervising Attorney Mark Morodomi; and $1,050 from attorney Amber Maltbie, a former aide to Assemblyman Sandre Swanson, whom Bonta now hopes to succeed.

Guillen’s campaign had $107,040.94 cash on hand at the end of 2011, including $13,650 he loaned to it himself; since then, he scored a $7,800 contribution from the California Federation of Teachers Committee on Political Education (COPE) PAC. Also among his contributions are $3,900 from Cordoba Corp. of Los Angeles, $4,400 from Seville Construction Services of Pasadena, $2,000 from Steinberg Architects of San Jose and $1,000 from Olive Construction Management of El Cerrito, all of which do business with the Peralta college district. Among his elected contributors are Board of Equalization member Betty Yee ($1,000), Oakland Unified School District Board President David Kakishiba ($1,000) and Assemblyman Luis Alejo ($500).

And Young’s campaign had $171,827.32 cash on hand at the end of 2011. Among his contributions are $3,900 each from the Amalgamated Transit Union in Washington, D.C. and from the ATU’s California Conference Board; $5,500 from Emeryville-based developer Eddie Orton and his wife; $3,650 from the Engineering & Utility Contractors Association PAC; and $3,500 from AC Transit Ward 4 Director Mark Williams’ campaign.

Posted on Thursday, February 23rd, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, campaign finance | 3 Comments »

Kathy Neal drops 18th Assembly District bid

Kathy Neal is halting her 18th Assembly District campaign.

Kathy Neal“I am proud of the progress we made in such a short period of time and greatly appreciate the help, partnerships, and backing that emerged from a widely diverse base of support,” Neal, 62, of Oakland, said in a statement issued early this morning. “While I will not be an active participant in the race at this time, I will continue to be involved in state and local politics, because I am committed to improving the lives of those in our community, especially for those among us who are less fortunate or disenfranchised.”

Although her release said she “entered the race much later than her opposition yet garnered considerable traction,” it seemed she wasn’t keeping up with the other Democrats in the race: Alameda Vice Mayor Rob Bonta; Peralta Community College District Trustee Abel Guillen; and AC Transit Director-at-Large Joel Young.

Neal – the owner of an information technology consulting firm; a former Port of Oakland commissioner; and ex-wife of former Assemblyman and former Oakland Mayor Elihu Harris – was trailing far behind all three of them in campaign contributions. And although Neal is a county and state Democratic committeewoman, she trailed behind the others in votes at the party’s local pre-endorsement conference a few weeks ago (though none of them got enough votes to win an endorsement).

Neal noted she has worked to elect other California Democratic women including Maxine Waters, Barbara Lee, Jackie Speier and Barbara Boxer as well as more local names such as Alameda County Supervisor Nadia Lockyer, Oakland Councilwoman Desley Brooks and Peralta trustee Linda Handy.

“As women, I have always believed that our voices must be heard and I have worked tirelessly to place strong and effective women in elective office,” Neal said. “While I regret that at this time I am unable to continue my candidacy in the new 18th Assembly District, I look forward to future races where I can play an integral role in ensuring greater representation of women in office.”

She thanked all who have “committed time, energy and resources to my campaign. You are truly remarkable people. Going forward, I will assure that your confidence in me was well placed by continuing the work I have always done for the full, positive and beneficial inclusion of everyone in all that our society has to offer.”

Posted on Friday, February 10th, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election | 1 Comment »

Early cash winners emerge in East Bay races

The money race in East Bay state legislative contests reveals a handful of early leaders in the open seats, according to campaign finance reports filed this week.

Democrat and Oakley Mayor Jim Frazier, one of five declared candidates in the new open Assembly District 11 seat, substantially out-raised his opponents by threefold as of Dec. 31, 2011, the end of the last reporting period.

In Assembly District 18, the new western Alameda County seat, Alameda Councilman Rob Bonta and AC Transit board member Joel Young, both Democrats, reported similar numbers and outpaced the other two declared candidates.

In Assembly District 20, which includes Union City and San Leandro, Democrat and Hayward Councilman Bill Quirk has a large financial lead but largely due to a personal loan.

Savvy observers will rightly note that the filing period doesn’t open until Feb. 13 but the most successful candidates are often those who get an early start and  lock down contributions and endorsements.

Here’s a cash rundown for East Bay state legislative candidates:

Assembly District 11: New district in east Contra Costa County and large swath of  Solano County

  • Jim Frazier, Democrat and Oakley mayor: $109,709 in total contributions; $97,874 cash in the bank; and loans of $2,500.
  • Patricia Hernandez,  Democrat and chief negotiator at Union of American Dentists and Physicians, Rio Vista: $38,050 in total contributions; $30,349 cash in the bank; and no loans.
  • Gene Gantt, Democrat and retired fire chief, Benicia: $29,404 in total contributions; $28,510 cash in the bank; and no loans.
  • Len Augustine, independent and former Vacaville councilman: No filing.
  • Mike Hudson, Republican and Suisun City councilman: No filing.

Assembly District 14

  • Susan Bonilla, Democratic incumbent, Concord: $211,666 in total contributions; $40,735 in the bank; no loans.

Assembly District 15

  • Nancy Skinner, Democratic incumbent, Berkeley: $358,626 in total contributions; $400,066 in the bank; and no loans.

Assembly District 16

  • Joan Buchanan, Democratic incumbent, Alamo: $101,500 in total contributions; $7,188 in the bank; loans unpaid from 2008 campaign of $100,000.
  • David Haubert, Republican and Dublin Unified School District trustee: $46,624 in total contributions, $42,601 in the bank; no loans.

Assembly District 18 (New open seat in western Alameda County including Oakland, Alameda, San Leandro.)

  • Rob Bonta, Democrat and Alameda councilman: $161,883 in total contributions; $132,239 in the bank; and loans of $7,500.
  • Abel Guillen, Democratic and Peralta Community College District Trustee: $118,584 in total contributions; $107,040 in the bank; loans of $13,650.
  • Kathy Neal, Democrat and Alameda County Democratic Central Committee member: $47,029 in contributions; $30,946 in the bank; and loans of $4,750.
  • Joel Young, Democrat and AC Transit District board member: $154,078 in total contributions; $171,827 in the bank; and loans of $50,000.

Assembly District 20 (open)

  • Sarabjit Cheema, Democrat and New Haven Unified School District trustee: No filing.
  • Mark Green, independent and Union City councilman: No filing.
  • Jennifer Ong, Democrat and eye doctor, San Leandro: $126,892 in total contributions; $93,734 in the bank; loans of $48,100.
  • Bill Quirk, Democrat and Hayward councilman: $170,156 in total contributions; $134,717 in the bank; and personal loan of $96,000.

State Senate District 7

  • Mark DeSaulnier, Democratic incumbent, Concord: $269,760 in total contributions; $217,754 in the bank; no loans.

State Senate District 9

  • Loni Hancock, Democratic incumbent, Berkeley: $335,174 in total contributions; $272,377 in the bank; no loans.

Posted on Thursday, February 2nd, 2012
Under: 2012 Assembly election, 2012 State Senate election, campaign finance | No Comments »