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Commerce Secretary attends Oakland forum

U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker joined Rep. Barbara Lee and other officials Monday for a regional economic development forum at Oakland International Airport, focused on creating more jobs and growing businesses in the East Bay.

Penny Pritzker“The Department of Commerce has tremendous resources in place in this region and around the country that allow us to partner with your businesses and entrepreneurs so they can compete and succeed,” Pritzker said in a news release issued by Lee, D-Oakland, after the event.

“Here in the Bay Area, we are working with companies large and small to sell their goods and services to the 95 percent of global consumers who live outside the U.S., helping to create the conditions for innovators and entrepreneurs to thrive, and supporting minority-and women-owned businesses through our Minority Business Development Agency,” she said, adding her department “is committed to helping your companies grow and thrive so they can create jobs – that is our mission and a core objective for President Obama.”

Lee said small businesses “are fundamental to the East Bay’s economic growth, especially women and minority-owned businesses.

“These businesses create jobs, contribute to our community and create opportunities into the middle class,” she said. “In order to ensure continued economic growth, we need to investment in sharing the available resources with these businesses and businesses owners to help them succeed.”

Other attendees included regional Small Business Administration Administrator Donna Davis; Minority Business Development Agency Director Alejandra Castillo; Overseas Private Investment Corp. Director of Corporate Development Alison Germak; Port of Oakland Aviation Director Deborah Ale Flint; Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson; and Oakland Mayor Jean Quan.

Earlier Monday, Lee had hosted a roundtable discussion with Pritzker and East Bay business leaders to discuss economic development, supplier diversity and the importance of gender and ethnic diversity in corporate leadership.

Posted on Tuesday, August 12th, 2014
Under: Alameda County, Alameda County Board of Supervisors, Barbara Lee, economy, Jean Quan, Oakland, U.S. House | No Comments »

Drug charges against Nadia Lockyer dismissed

An Orange County judge dismissed drug charges Friday against former Alameda County Supervisor Nadia Lockyer, wife of state Treasurer Bill Lockyer, according to reports from the Associated Press and Los Angeles Times.

OC weekly coverA court spokeswoman told the AP the charges were dropped at prosecutors request; the Times reports she agreed to attend a drug diversion program.

Lockyer early in 2012 had claimed Stephen Chikhani attacked her in a Newark hotel room, but the state Justice Department investigated and eventually declined to charge him with any crime. As details emerged about Lockyer’s lengthy affair with Chikhani and their drug use, she resigned her supervisorial seat in April 2012.

Bill Lockyer filed for divorce a few months later, citing “irreconcilable differences” and seeking joint physical and legal custody of their son. Then Nadia Lockyer was arrested in August 2012 in Orange County and charged with felony methamphetamine possession and three misdemeanors: being under the influence of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, and child abuse and endangerment. She spent several months in a residential rehabilitation program and has been under court supervision ever since.

Nadia Lockyer also was the subject of a lengthy cover story in this week’s OC Weekly.

Posted on Friday, January 17th, 2014
Under: Alameda County Board of Supervisors, Bill Lockyer | No Comments »

Cool Rep. George Miller factoids

Lafayette political blogger Jason Bezis at CalPolitical has posted some very cool factoids about retiring Rep. George Miller, D-Martinez, and East Bay representation in Congress for the past 150 years:

East San Francisco Bay Area Members of Congress: 1865 to 2014: George Miller is Just Third to Retire Normally in 150 Years

 Thirty-five individuals (33 men and two women) have represented the East San Francisco Bay Area (Alameda and Contra Costa counties) in the U.S. House of Representatives since California’s first single-member districts were created in 1864.  (Not including the two congressmen who represented California at-large from 1883 to 1885.  California gained two seats in 1882 as a result of the post-1880 census re-apportionment but the Legislature postponed re-districting until the 1884 congressional elections.) 
 
The East Bay today has six U.S. representatives: George Miller, Barbara Lee, Eric Swalwell, Jerry McNerney, Mike Honda and Mike Thompson.
 
Here is how the 29 other East Bay U.S. representatives left their East Bay districts:
 
  • Defeated in primary or general elections: 14 (Higby, Page, Hilborn, English, MacLafferty, Eltse, Carter, Condon, Allen, Cohelan, George P. Miller, Baker, Pombo, Stark)
  • Died in office: 3 (Elston, Curry Sr., Baldwin)
  • Resigned mid-term: 4 (McKenna, Metcalf, Dellums, Tauscher)
  • Re-districting caused loss of all East Bay territory: 3 (Curry, Jr., Edwards, Garamendi)
  • Ran for another office at end of term: 3 (Sargent, Knowland, Waldie)
  • Retired at end of term: 2 (Budd, Tolan)
 

Retirements are very rare.  Just two East Bay representatives in the past 150 years have retired from the House and not sought another political office immediately thereafter: James Budd in 1884 and John Tolan in 1946.  George Miller III will become the third in 2014.

Link to the rest of CalPolitical’s post here.

Posted on Thursday, January 16th, 2014
Under: Alameda County, Congress, Contra Costa County | No Comments »

TRUST Act activists target sheriffs in Sac, Oakland

Four protesters supporting the TRUST Act anti-deportation legislation now on Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk reportedly were arrested Wednesday after a protest and sit-in at the office of the California State Sheriffs’ Association, which opposes the bill.

The sheriffs’ association said the four refused repeated demands that they leave the private property, and were taken to Sacramento County Jail. Alameda County Sheriff Gregory Ahern, the association’s president, later contacted protesters to explain his group’s position.

But apparently they’re all too aware of that position, as they’re planning to hold a “pray-in” at Ahern’s Oakland office Thursday morning.

Among the leaders of Thursday’s protest will be Pancho Ramos-Stierle, who was arrested as he meditated while police cleared the Occupy Oakland encampment in 2011 and was held by Ahern’s office on behalf of immigration authorities; his immigration case is still pending.

Currently, when someone is booked into a county jail, the suspect’s fingerprints are sent to the FBI for comparison with criminal databases. Under the Secure Communities program launched in 2008, the FBI shares that information with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency. If ICE thinks the inmate might be deportable, it asks jail officials to hold that person until an immigration agent can review the case and perhaps take the inmate away for deportation.

AB 4 by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-San Francisco – the TRUST (Transparency and Responsibility Using State Tools) Act – would forbid jail officials from honoring those immigration holds in many cases.

The sheriffs’ association issued a statement Wednesday afternoon explaining that the law “would require offenders that have been subject to prior removal orders, previously deported from the country, or have been charged with serious and violent felonies to be released into the community. It also would require sheriffs to release persons that, while not having been previously convicted of a serious or violent offense, have been deemed threats to national security or public safety by the Department of Homeland Security.”

Finally, the association noted, AB 4 would require a sheriff to let someone go if required by “local law” or “any local policy.”

“These terms are not defined and could defeat even the narrow exceptions provided by AB 4 that would allow a sheriff to hold a person that has been convicted of serious and violent felonies,” the association’s statement said.

But the groups behind tomorrow’s protest in Oakland – Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice, Faith Alliance for a Moral Economy, and the East Bay Interfaith Immigration Coalition – contend AB 4 gives law enforcement much broader discretion to honor immigration “hold” requests than the similar bill Brown vetoed last year, while ensuring that those with most low-level, non-violent offenses are not wastefully held for deportation.

“We pray for renewed trust between law-enforcement and immigrant communities in Alameda County and throughout our state. And we pray that Sheriff Ahern will open his heart to hear the pleas of the people, for safety and protection from indiscriminate detention and deportations,” Rev. Deborah Lee said in a news release. “And we pray that the Governor will sign this bill, so as to advance immigration reform.”

Posted on Wednesday, September 18th, 2013
Under: Alameda County, Assembly, California State Senate, Jerry Brown, Tom Ammiano | 2 Comments »

It’s National Voter Registration Day. Do it. Do it.

Today has been National Voter Registration Day, and Bay Area officials and activists joined their peers across the nation in urging people to “register in September and make it count in November.”

photo courtesy of Keith CarsonRep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, and Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson were among those who rallied at mid-day outside the Alameda County Administration Building in Oakland to urge all eligible voters to register and cast ballots this fall.

The Oakland event was one of several held today across the nation by members of the Congressional Black Caucus as a part of the “For the People” Voter Protection Initiative. H. Res. 542 condemns “the passage of legislation that would unduly burden an American citizen’s ability to vote and opposing any State election law or proposed legislation that would have a disproportionate impact on vulnerable communities across the country.”

“We are engaged in a battle to protect the fundamental, Constitutional right to vote,” Lee said later Tuesday. “Voter suppression tactics do nothing at all to prevent voter fraud, while disproportionately excluding and disenfranchising people of color, elderly and young adults from their Constitutionally given right to vote. By preparing all Alameda County residents to vote this fall, we are standing in solidarity with communities fighting intense battles against voter suppression efforts throughout the country.”

Lee notes that at least 34 states have introduced laws that would require voters to show photo identification in order to vote, and at least 12 states have introduced laws that would require proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate, to register to vote or to vote. The states that have already cut back on voting rights provide 171 electoral votes in 2012, 63 percent of the 270 needed to win the presidency, she said.

on Sproul Plaza (photo by Josh Richman)Meanwhile, groups at the University of California, Berkeley – including the Associated Students, Voto Latino and others – had tables on Sproul Plaza today in an attempt to register as many people as possible.

Election Day is six weeks away. Still not registered to vote? You’ve got until Monday, Oct. 22, and you need not even get up from where you’re sitting right now reading this post: You can register online. Or, if you prefer, printed voter registration forms are available at many government offices, DMV offices, post offices, public libraries and other locations.

Posted on Tuesday, September 25th, 2012
Under: Alameda County, Barbara Lee, U.S. House, voter registration | 4 Comments »

Watch Mary Hayashi make her case to local Dems

Assemblywoman Mary Hayashi, D-Hayward, was at this past Saturday’s Alameda County Democratic Central Committee meeting, seeking the committee’s endorsement of her campaign for the District 2 seat on the Alameda County Board of Supervisors.

Hayashi was arrested last October for shoplifting $2,450 worth of clothes from San Francisco’s Neiman Marcus; she pleaded no contest in January to misdemeanor grand theft and was sentenced to three years of probation and a $180 fine. In an exclusive July interview, she insisted that her walking out of the store with black leather pants, a black leather skirt and a white blouse in a Nieman Marcus shopping bag that she had brought with her was entirely inadvertent; she said she believes voters would forgive her and vote for her on her legislative track record.

On Saturday, she was asked, “How do you exemplify the values of integrity and honesty we want for our elected officials?” Here’s her answer:

The committee announced its endorsements Sunday night: It picked Richard Valle – the incumbent appointed to fill the District 2 seat after former Supervisor Nadia Lockyer resigned – over Hayashi for November’s election. Union City Mayor Mark Green, a former longtime Democrat now registered without party affiliation, also is in the race.

Posted on Monday, September 17th, 2012
Under: Alameda County, Alameda County Board of Supervisors, Assembly, Mary Hayashi | 6 Comments »

County Dems seek $$$ from would-be endorsees

An anonymous caller directed me to the Alameda County Democratic Central Committee’s website, where candidates filling out an endorsement application are asked for a $50 contribution “to offset the cost of our endorsement process.”

“It just seems undemocratic,” said the caller (whom I assume meant that with a small “d”), acknowledging he’s running for a local office and so declining to provide his name lest he incur the party’s wrath. “I’ve been a Democrat all my life, and this is a little bit over the top; it’s not like I don’t already contribute to the president and other campaigns.”

Chairwoman Robin Torello said the county party started soliciting such contributions from candidates in 2010, although it just raised the suggested ante from $25 to $50 “because it was not covering our expenses, plus this is a bigger year with more races.”

Torello said her committee is looking at almost 200 Democrats running in more than 120 local races across the county this November. Vetting so many candidates for endorsement means spending on everything from printing, postage and phone costs to refreshments for the volunteer committee members who’ll be sitting through five full days of interviews, she said.

The process takes “dozens and dozens and dozens of hours, and we’re all volunteers except for one staff person, but one person can’t do all this,” she said, noting the $50 is just a suggested contribution. “We don’t not interview people if they don’t pay – it’s a donation to help defray the costs. And we’re just aligning ourselves with other county committees that have been doing this for years. We think it’s warranted.”

Contra Costa County Democratic Party officials couldn’t immediately be reached for comment on whether they charge such fees, too. (UPDATE @ 8:22 A.M. WEDNESDAY: They don’t, chairman Chuck Carpenter said in an e-mail last night.)

On the other side of the Bay, San Mateo County Democratic Central Committee Chairman David Burruto said his committee used to charge “a nominal fee just because we had to Xerox a lot of things,” but in this age of fast, cheap email has stopped doing so.

“We don’t charge anything,” he said. “The only thing we ask of candidates sometimes is if they want to be on a slate mailer.”

In the South Bay, chairman Steve Preminger said “at no point in our endorsement process does the Santa Clara County Democratic Central Committee state or imply that a candidate seeking our endorsement should make a financial contribution or pay any fees to the SCCDP.”

Posted on Tuesday, August 14th, 2012
Under: Alameda County, Democratic Party, Democratic politics | 3 Comments »

Filing period for local candidates opens July 16

If you have a hankering to run for public office, the time is now.

The candidate filing period opens July 16 and runs through Aug. 10 for hundreds of local city, school and special district offices. In districts where an incumbent fails to file for re-election, the deadline is extended to Aug. 15.

In Contra Costa County, nomination forms for school and special district offices are dispensed through the county election office at 555 Escobar St., in Martinez. City council forms are available at the respective city clerk’s offices.

In Alameda County, nomination forms for school and special district offices are dispensed through the county election office at 1225 Fallon Street, Room G-1, Oakland. City council forms are available at the respective city clerk’s offices.

Contra Costa seats up for election on Nov. 6 are:

  • Antioch mayor, City Council (two seats)
  • Brentwood mayor, City Council (two seats)
  • Clayton City Council (three seats)
  • Concord City Council (two seats)
  • Danville Town Council (three seats)
  • El Cerrito City Council (three seats)
  • Hercules City Council (three seats)
  • Lafayette City Council (three seats)
  • Martinez City Council (two seats), city clerk, treasurer
  • Moraga City Council (three seats)
  • Oakley City Council (three seats)
  • Orinda City Council (two seats)
  • Pinole City Council (two seats), treasurer
  • Pittsburg City Council (two seats)
  • Pleasant Hill City Council (three seats), city clerk, treasurer
  • Richmond City Council (three seats)
  • San Pablo City Council (three seats)
  • Walnut Creek City Council (three seats)
  • Crockett Community Services District (three seats)
  • Diablo Community Services District (three seats)
  • Discovery Bay Community Services District (three seats)
  • Dublin San Ramon Services District (three seats)
  • Kensington Police Protection and Community Services District (two seats)
  • Knightsen Town Community Services District (two seats)
  • Moraga-Orinda Fire Protection District (three seats)
  • Rode-Hercules Fire Protection District (three seats)
  • Los Medanos Community Healthcare District (three seats)
  • Mt. Diablo Healthcare District (four seats) **This elected board is set to be disbanded on Aug. 9 and its duties reassigned to the Concord City Council.
  • West Contra Costa Healthcare District (two seats)
  • Bethel Island Municipal Improvement District (three seats)
  • East Bay Municipal Utility District (one seat)
  • Ambrose Recreation and Park District (two seats)
  • East Bay Regional Park District (two seats)
  • Green Valley Recreation and Park District (three seats)
  • Pleasant Hill Recreation and Park District (two seats)
  • Rollingwood-Wilart Park Recreation and Park District (two seats)
  • Byron Sanitary District (three seats)
  • Central Contra Costa Sanitary District (three seats)
  • Ironhouse Sanitary District (three seats)
  • Mt. View Sanitary District (three seats)
  • Rodeo Sanitary District (three seats)
  • Stege Sanitary District (two seats)
  • West County Wastewater District (two seats)
  • Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (two seats)
  • Bay Area Rapid Transit District (three seats, districts 1, 3 and 7)
  • Castle Rock Water District (four seats)
  • Diablo Water District (two seats)
  • Byron Bethany Irrigation District (one seat)
  • East Contra Costa Irrigation District (three seats)
  • Acalanes Union High School District (two seats)
  • Antioch Unified School District (three seats)
  • Brentwood Union School District (two seats)
  • Byron Union School District (two seats)
  • Canyon Elementary School District (two seats)
  • Contra Costa County Board of Education (two seats)
  • Contra Costa Community College District (two seats, wards 2 and 5)
  • Chabot-Las Positas Community College District (one seat, Ward 7)
  • John Swett Unified School District (two seats)
  • Knightsen School District (three seats)
  • Lafayette School District (two seats)
  • Liberty Union High School District (two seats)
  • Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District (two seats)
  • Martinez Unified School District (three seats)
  • Moraga School District (two seats)
  • Mt. Diablo Unified School District (two seats)
  • Oakley Union Elmentary School District (two seats)
  • Orinda Union School District (two seats)
  • Pittsburg Unified School District (three seats)
  • San Ramon Valley Unified School district (two seats)
  • Walnut Creek School District (two seats)
  • West Contra Costa Unified School District (two seats)

Alameda County seats up for election on Nov. 6 are:

  • Alameda County Board of Supervisors, District 2 (one seat)
  • Alameda City Council (two seats), auditor, treasurer
  • Albany City Council (three seats)
  • Albany Board of Education (two seats)
  • Berkeley mayor, City Council (four seats, districts 2, 3, 5 and 6)
  • Berkeley Rent Board (four seats)
  • Berkeley Board of Education (two seats)
  • Dublin mayor and City Council (two seats)
  • Fremont mayor and City Council (two seats)
  • Oakland City Council (five seats, at-large and districts 1, 3, 5 and 7), city attorney
  • Pleasanton mayor and City Council (two seats)
  • San Leandro City Council (three seats, district 2, 4 and 6)
  • Union City mayor and City Council (one seat)
  • Chabot-Los Positas Community College District (four seats, district 1, 3, 5 and 7)
  • Peralta Community College District (four seats)
  • San Joaquin Delta Community College District (one seat)
  • Alameda Unified School District (three seats)
  • Castro Valley Unified School District (three seats)
  • Dublin Unified School District (three seats)
  • Fremont Unified School District (three seats)
  • Hayward Unified School District (three seats)
  • Livermore Unified School District (two seats)
  • Mount House Elementary (one seat)
  • New Haven Unified School District (three seats)
  • Newark Unified School District (three seats)
  • Pleasanton Unified School District (three seats)
  • San Leandro Unified School district (three seats)
  • San Lorenzo Unified School District (four seats)
  • Sunol Glen Unified School district (1 seat)
  • AC Transit (three seats)
  • Alameda County Water District (three seats)
  • Bay Area Rapid Transit District (three seats, wards 3, 5 and 7)
  • Castro Valley Sanitary District (three seats)
  • City of Alameda Healthcare District (two seats)
  • Dublin-San Ramon Services District (three seats)
  • East Bay Municipal Utility District (two seats, wards 5 and 6)
  • East Bay Regional Park District (three seats, wards, 1, 2 and 4)
  • Eden Township Healthcare District (two seats)
  • Fairview Fire Protection District (three seats)
  • Hayward Area Recreation and Park District (three seats)
  • Livermore Area Recreation and Park District (three seats)
  • Oro Loma Sanitary District (two seats)
  • Washington Township Healthcare District (two seats)

 

Posted on Friday, July 6th, 2012
Under: 2012 presidential election, Alameda County, Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics | 1 Comment »

Alameda Co. Sheriff named to lottery commission

Gov. Jerry Brown today named Alameda County Sheriff Gregory Ahern to the California Lottery Commission.

Gregory AhernAhern, 54, of Livermore, has been sheriff/coroner for Alameda County since 2007, and has served in the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office since 1980; he was as assistant sheriff from 2006 to 2007, commander from 2005 to 2006, captain from 2003 to 2005, lieutenant from 2000 to 2003, sergeant from 1986 to 2000 and deputy sheriff from 1980 to 1986.

The position requires state Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Ahern is registered to vote as a Republican.

The three-member commission oversees the state lottery to ensure its integrity, security and fairness, holding public meetings at least once a quarter. Members serve five-year terms, and at least one member must have five or more years of experience in law enforcement. The previous law-enforcement member was Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims.

Posted on Monday, March 12th, 2012
Under: Alameda County | No Comments »

Filing deadline passes and East Bay ballots firm up

The 5 p.m. filing deadline today has come and gone and election clerks in the East Bay have delivered their promised preliminary candidate and ballot lists.

Check out the list below for Contra Costa, Alameda and portions of Solano County. There are a few surprises, including a fair number of entirely uncontested races. (The women rule here, as you’ll see.)

My favorite development is the similarity between the name of incumbent Democratic state Sen. Mark DeSaulnier and his Republican challenger Mark Meuser. The Marks might want to hand out reading glasses to voters in the hopes the magnification effect will help them choose the right one.

Voters in a dozen cities, school and fire districts will also find requests for new taxes on their ballots. While no one wants to pay more, residents are far more likely to support local measures because they feel the money will stay closer to home.

The following individuals and ballot measures had qualified for the June 5 ballot as of information available late today. (i) denotes incumbent. (Keep in mind, election clerks may still be processing applications from those who filed at the last minute.)

(Ed. Note: I’ve updated this at 4:30 p.m. Saturday — Josh)

CONGRESS

District 3: John Garamendi, Dem. (i); Kim Vann, Rep.; Eugene Ray, Rep., Rick Tubbs, Rep.

District 5: Mike Thompson, Dem., (i); Randy Loftin, Rep.; John Cilley, Rep.

District 9: Jerry McNerney, Dem., (i); John McDonald, Rep.; Ricky Gill, Rep.

District 11: George Miller, Dem. (i); Cheryl Sudduth, Dem.; John Fitzgerald, Dem.; Virginia Fuller, Rep.

District 13: Barbara Lee, Dem. (i); Marilyn Singleton, nonpartisan; Justin Jelincic, Dem.

District 15: Fortney “Pete” Stark, Dem. (i); Eric Swalwell, Dem.; Christopher Pareja, nonpartisan.

District 17: Mike Honda, Dem. (i); Charles Richardson, Lib.; Evelyn Li, Dem.

STATE SENATE

District 3: Lois Wolk, Dem. (i)

District 7: Mark DeSaulnier, Dem. (i); Mark Meuser, Rep.

District 9: Loni Hancock, Dem. (i)

ASSEMBLY

District 11: (No incumbent) Jim Frazier, Dem.; Patricia Hernandez, Dem.; Gene Gantt, Dem.; Len Augustine, nonpartisan; Mike Hudson, Rep., Charles Kingeter, Dem.

District 14: Susan Bonilla, Dem. (i)

District 15: Nancy Skinner, Dem. (i)

District 16: Joan Buchanan, Dem. (i); Al Phillips, Rep.

District 18: (No incumbent) Rob Bonta, Dem.; Joel Young, Dem.; Abel Guillen, Dem., Rhonda Weber, Rep.

District 20: (No incumbent) Bill Quirk, Dem.; Jennifer Ong, Dem.; Sarabjit Cheema, Dem.; Luis Reynoso, Rep.; Mark Green, nonpartisan

District 25: Bob Wieckowski, Dem. (i)

ALAMEDA COUNTY (nonpartisan races)

Board of Supervisors, District 1: Scott Haggerty (i)

Board of Supervisors, District 4: Nate Miley (i); Tojo Thomas

Board of Supervisors, District 5: Keith Carson (i)

Hayward City Council (four seats): Barbara Halliday (i), Francisco Zermeno (i), Olden Henson, (i), Al Mendall, Greg Jones, Fahim Ajaz Khan, Ralph Farias Jr. and Peter Bufete. (Filing deadline extended to March 14 as one of the incumbents did not seek re-election.)

Board of Education, District 2: None

Board of Education, District 3: Ken Berrick (i)

Board of Education, District 4: None

Board of Education, District 5: Frederick Sims (i)

Board of Education, District 6: Eileen McDonald (i)

Zone 7 (three seats): Sandy Figuers (i); Dick Quigley (i)

Union Sanitary District, Ward 1: Manuel Fernandez (i)

Union Sanitary District, Ward 2: Patricia Kite (i)

Union Sanitary District, Ward 3: Anjali Lathi (i)

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY (nonpartisan)

Board of Supervisors, District 2: Sean White of Lafayette, Candace Andersen of Danville; and Tomi Van de Brooke of Orinda. (Filing deadline extended to March 14 as incumbent Gayle Uilkema did not seek re-election.)

Board of Supervisors, District 3: Mary Nejedly Piepho of Discovery Bay (i)

Board of Supervisors, District 5: Federal Glover of Pittsburg (i)

CONTRA COSTA BALLOT MEASURES

Antioch Unified School District: $59.5 million bond measure for school facility upgrades. Requires 55 percent voter approval.

Antioch: Two measures. One seeks to change city clerk and treasurer from elected to appointed position. The other would convert elected mayor to a rotating position from among members of the City Council. Both require majority approval.

Crockett Community Services District: Increase in the $50 recreation per parcel tax to $110 for maintenance of the area’s parks. Two-thirds vote required.

East Contra Costa Fire Protection District: Annual $197 per parcel tax to maintain fire service. Two-thirds vote required.

Hercules: Two measures. One seeks voter approval to sell the city’s electric company and requires a two-thirds vote. The second is an emergency funding proposal for a four-year, 1/2-cent sales tax to maintain city services in the wake of a deficit. Majority approval required.

Pittsburg: A 10-year sales tax (1/2 cent for first five years, 1/4 cent in the second five years) to raise money for city services. Majority approval required.

San Pablo: A 10-year sales tax (1/2 cent for first five years, 1/4 cent in the second five years) to raise money for city services. Majority approval required.

West Contra Costa Unified School District: Five-year renewal and increase in parcel tax. Requires two-thirds vote.

ALAMEDA COUNTY BALLOT MEASURES

Peralta Community College District: Eight-year annual $48 per parcel tax. The funds would be used to preserve 1,900 classes a year at the college serving students from Oakland, Alameda, Piedmont, Berkeley, Albany and Emeryville. Requires two-thirds vote.

Dublin Unified School District: $99 million school bond measure to build and improve classrooms, buildings and equipment. Requires 55 percent voter approval.

Hayward Unified School District: Annual $58 per parcel tax for school operations. Two-thirds vote required.

New Haven Unified School District (Hayward): Four-year annual $180 per parcel tax to fund school operations. It is similar to a measure that failed last May. Two-thirds vote required.

City of Alameda: A 30-year half-cent sales tax increase to fund library improvements, replace aging police and fire vehicles and construct a new emergency center. Two-thirds vote required.

SOLANO COUNTY

Countywide: Would extend existing one-eighth of 1 percent library tax for 16 years to fund ongoing operations. Majority approval required.

Board of Supervisors, District 1 (no incumbent): Susan Anthony, Erin Hannigan, Tony Intintoli Jr., Lee Simmons.

Board of Supervisors, District 2: Steve Messina, Linda Seifert (i)

Board of Supervisors, District 5: Mike Reagan (i); Skip Thomson

 

Posted on Friday, March 9th, 2012
Under: 2012 primary election, Alameda County, Alameda County Board of Supervisors, ballot measures, Contra Costa Board of Supervisors, Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics | 28 Comments »