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Ellen Tauscher endorses Van de Brooke in Contra Costa race

Tomi Van de Brooke

Ellen Tauscher

Free from the strictures imposed upon federal employees,  former Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security and former Democratic East Bay Congresswoman Ellen Tauscher has endorsed Tomi Van de Brooke for Contra Costa County supervisor.

Tauscher left her high-ranking post in February after serving three years with friend and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. A cancer survivor, Tauscher said she wanted to take time to do other things with her life. She remains a special envoy for the State Department and recently joined the Atlantic Council’s Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security.

One of those things Tauscher apparently wanted to do was help her friends back home with their elections. Tauscher will host a fund-raiser for Van de Brooke next week in Contra Costa County.

Van de Brooke, a Contra Costa Community College trustee and Orinda resident, is running in the June 5 election for the District 2 seat held by retiring Supervisor Gayle Uilkema of Lafayette. Also vying for the opening is Danville Mayor Candace Andersen and Lafayette solar expert Sean White.

Posted on Friday, March 30th, 2012
Under: 2012 primary election, Contra Costa Board of Supervisors, Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics | 15 Comments »

Chevron appeal decision set for Monday in Contra Costa

The Contra Costa County Assessment Appeals board will release its decision Monday on Chevron’s challenge of its Richmond refinery values.

The oil giant seeks refunds worth up to $73 million in property taxes it paid from 2007 through 2009, or slightly more than half of what the company was assessed.

The county and cities, along with fire, parks and other dozens of other special districts, will bear the burden of any repayment at a time when most public agencies have already experienced years of declining budgets.

The three-member appeals board heard dozens of hours of testimony over the winter on the complex challenge from the county’s largest property taxpayer.

Chevron argued that Contra Costa County Assessor Gus Kramer and his staff failed to document how they derived the values and intentionally miscalculated the final numbers. (Read an excerpt of Chevron’s brief filed with the Assessment Appeals Board here.)

In response, Kramer accuses the deep-pocketed oil company of systematically bullying the county with unsubstantiated and costly appeals and lawsuits in an effort to lower its taxes.

If the board sides with Chevron, it will be the refinery’s second victory in its nearly eight-year fight with Kramer over its taxable worth.

The panel in 2010 ordered a repayment of $17.8 million on the refinery’s 2004-2006 property assessment appeal, a figure far short of what the company sought. Chevron subsequently filed a lawsuit, which is still pending.

Chevron has also appealed its 2010 and 2011 property values.

Refinery spokesman Dean O’Hair said the company remains eager to negotiate with the county a settlement of all the appeals and the lawsuit.

If the appeals board orders a refund, O’Hair said Chevron will again work with the county to minimize the financial impact on the public agencies including a phased-in repayment schedule and a waiver of interest.

The public appeals board hearing begins at 9 a.m. in the Contra Costa County administration building, 651 Pine St., Martinez.

 

Posted on Friday, March 30th, 2012
Under: Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics, Richmond, taxes | 1 Comment »

Controversial Richmond department fuels PR duel

Richmond Office of Neighborhood Safety Director DeVone Boggan uncharacteristically fired off a swift and strongly worded press release in response to the broad release of a critical report prepared in the office of vocal critic and Richmond Councilman Corky Boozé. (See links below.)

Boggan called the report an unsubstantiated, error-ridden and poorly written document prepared by an unqualified intern. And he chastised the city for allowing what he called a “student opinion paper” to be distributed through the council agenda process.

“In the absence of a graduate school supervisor providing appropriate direction and feedback (particularly around biased presentations) this report should be considered nothing more than a writing exercise draft,” Boggan wrote.

The Office of Neighborhood Safety has been under fire for months after a bloody fight broke out in city hall between rival clients and scared the bejeezus out of staffers. Created six years ago, the department attempts to reduce gun violence in the community through a variety of intervention programs.

Boggan recently agreed that an independent evaluation is appropriate and has requested $375,000 for the analysis.

In the meantime, Boozé has had the agency in his crosshairs for some time. He has questioned Boggan’s $148,000-a-year salary, requested audits of the $2.6 million-a-year department and has repeatedly asked for proof of its efficacy.

The public relations spat is further clouded by the fact that Boozé is at war with the progressive majority on the council, whose members regard the Office of Neighborhood Safety as a centerpiece in their efforts to reduce community violence through non-police channels.

Readers should definitely view with caution the contents of the 12-page intern’s report issued under the guidance of one of the Office of Neighborhood Safety’s most vocal opponent. But just because Boozé has an agenda doesn’t mean all the findings in this report are inaccurate. It raises serious questions about how this agency spends taxpayer dollars that must be answered if the public is to have confidence in Boggan’s leadership in light of what happened here last year.

Read Boggan’s press release here.

Read intern Anna Johnson’s report and Powerpoint presentations out of Booze’s office here and here.

Watch video of the City Council’s March 27 discussion here. (It is item No. I-1.)

Posted on Thursday, March 29th, 2012
Under: Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics, Richmond | 3 Comments »

Michael Gressett files claims of malicious prosecution in CoCo rape case

Former Contra Costa sex crimes prosecutor Michael Gressett has turned the tables on the agencies and people who pursued him for the alleged rape of a junior colleague nearly four years ago.  Read my full story here.  Watch video of the press conference here.

The state recently dropped the criminal charges, clearing the way for Gressett to file today damage claims — the precursor to a lawsuit — against Contra Costa County and Martinez, where he says he was the target of politically motivated malicious prosecution.

Speaking publicly for the first time about the graphic case that has wracked the District Attorney’s Office, the gregarious 55-year-old Gressett displayed his legendary spunk to journalists gathered at his attorney’s Oakland office.

“What would satisfy me would be a trial where all the people listening to the cross-examination would see what I have been seeing for years,” said Gressett, impeccably dressed in a dark suit and red-checkered tie.

But in other moments, a visibly distressed Gressett choked back tears as he spoke about the devastating impact on him and his family in the years since accusations surfaced that he raped a deputy district attorney with an ice pick, ice cubes and a gun during their lunch hour.

“It has destroyed my life in every way possible,” Gressett said. “If you Google my name, you see pages and pages of me being a rapist. You can never rectify that.”

He said the ordeal was especially hard on his college-age son.

Gressett even contemplated killing himself, anticipating the sexual assaults he would suffer in prison at the hands of other inmates as a former prosecutor convicted of a sex crime.

“It would have been a death sentence for me,” he said.

Read the rest of the story here.

 

 

Posted on Wednesday, March 21st, 2012
Under: Contra Costa County, Contra Costa District Attorney's Office, Contra Costa politics | 17 Comments »

CoCo supervisor race endorsements show support

The endorsement battle between Contra Costa County supervisor candidates Candace Andersen and Tomi Van de Brooke is getting interesting although I still maintain that endorsements don’t matter much to typical voters.

Still, the endorsement list does offer insight into where each of the candidates is finding financial and volunteer support, and signals where each might stand on policy decisions.

Andersen secured the nod from retiring Supervisor Gayle Uilkema of Lafayette. This isn’t a big surprise. Uilkema and Andersen, who is Danville’s mayor, have worked together for years on various boards and while the supervisor post is nonpartisan, both women are Republicans.

Andersen also secured recommendations from the county’s top law enforcement leaders along with the unions for the county’s prosecutors and deputy sheriffs.

Van de Brooke, a trustee on the Contra Costa Community College board, has locked down the endorsements of every major Democratic political leader in the county including state Superintendent of Public Schools Tom Torlakson; Rep. George Miller, D-Martinez; state Sen. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Concord; and assemblywomen Susan Bonilla, D-Concord, and Joan Buchanan, D-Alamo.

Will party registration matter in this race? It certainly matters to the two major parties, who view these seats as part of their farm teams. County supervisors do run for higher — and partisan — offices. Torlakson, DeSaulnier and Bonilla were all Contra Costa County supervisors. But for the average voter, whether or not partisanship plays a role will likely depend on how much of a campaign issue the candidates or their supporters make out of it.

There is no significant party registration incentive for either candidate. Of the five supervisor districts, District 2 has the most competitive party registration split: 39.8 percent of registered voters are  Democrats vs. 35.4 percent for Republicans. The other four heavily favor Democrats.

Candace Andersen

A sample of Andersen endorsements (click here for full list on her web site)

  • Gayle Uilkema, Contra Costa County supervisor
  • David Livingston, Contra Costa County Sheriff
  • Mark Peterson, Contra Costa District Attorney
  • Ken Westermann, Contra Costa Deputy Sheriffs Association president
  • Barry Grove, Contra Costa Deputy District Attorney Association president
  • Warren Rupf, retired Contra Costa County Sheriff
  • Charlie Abrams, former Mayor of Walnut Creek
  • Mike Anderson, Lafayette vice mayor
  • Newell Arnerich, Danville vice mayor
  • Bill Clarkson, San Ramon mayor
  • Mike Doyle, Danville councilman
  • Erlene DeMarcus, former BART director
  • Carol Federighi, Lafayette mayor
  • Paul Gardner, San Ramon Valley Unified School District Board of Education
  • Howard Harpham, Moraga vice mayor
  • David Harmer, former candidate for Congress
  • Guy Houston, former assemblyman and former Dublin mayor
  • David Hudson, San Ramon councilman
  • Denise Jennison, San Ramon Valley Unified School District Board of Education
  • Lynne Leach, former assemblywoman
  • Jim Livingstone, San Ramon councilman
  • Roxanne Lindsay, San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District
  • Judy Lloyd, former presidential appointee, U.S. Dept of Labor & U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
  • Mike Metcalf, Moraga mayor
  • Sue McNulty Rainey, former mayor of Walnut Creek and Moraga
  • Richard Rainey, former state senator, assemblyman and Contra Costa County Sheriff
  • Pat Rudebusch, Orinda Union School Board President
  • Christopher Severson, Orinda School Board Member
  • Sue Severson, Orinda councilwoman
  • David “Shoe” Shuey, Clayton councilman
  • Karen Stepper, Danville councilwoman
  • Robert Storer, Danville councilman
  • Hank Stratford, Clayton councilman
  • Dave Trotter, Moraga councilman
  • Jack Weir, Pleasant Hill councilman

Tomi Van de Brooke

A sampling of Van de Brooke endorsements (click here for full list on her web site)

  • Rep.  George Miller, D-Martinez
  • State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson
  • State Sen. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Concord
  • Assemblywoman Susan A. Bonilla, D-Concord
  • Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan, D-Alamo
  • Jim Kellogg, California Fish & Game Commissioner
  • Joseph A. Ovick, Contra Costa County Superintendent of Schools
  • John Coleman, East Bay MUD Board of Directors president
  • Robert J. Calone, Contra Costa Community College trustee
  • John E. Marquez, Contra Costa Community College trustee
  • Susanna Schlendorf, former Danville mayor
  • Tim Sbranti, Dublin mayor
  • Robert Schroder, Martinez mayor
  • Karen Mendonca, Moraga mayor
  • Brandt Andersson, Lafayette councilman
  • Anne Grodin, former Lafayette mayor of Lafayette
  • Victoria Smith, Orinda mayor
  • Amy Worth, Orinda councilwoman
  • Dean Orr, Orinda councilman
  • Laura Abrams, former Orinda mayor
  • Bob Simmons, Walnut Creek mayor
  • Kish Rajan, Walnut Creek vice mayor
  • Cindy Silva, Walnut Creek councilwoman
  • Kristina Lawson, Walnut Creek City councilwoman
  • Gwen Regalia, Former Walnut Creek mayor
  • David Bowlby, Alamo MAC Chair
  • Nancy Dommes, Alamo MAC Member
  • Ed Best, Alamo MAC Member
  • Steve Roberti, Fmr Secretary’s Representative, US Dept. of Labor
  •  Contra Costa County Firefighters

 

 

 

Posted on Monday, March 19th, 2012
Under: 2012 primary election, Contra Costa Board of Supervisors, Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics | 25 Comments »

CoCo needs to fill 44 redevelopment oversight openings

Contra Costa County needs a few good men and women. Actually, it needs way way more than a few.

The Board of Supervisors must fill 44 slots on the oversight boards that will supervise the dismantling of redevelopment agencies within the county.

The task is horrifically complex and the pay is zilch. But the county has no choice.

The state Supreme Court earlier this year upheld legislation that shut down as of Feb. 1 California’s 400 redevelopment agencies including those in Contra Costa County and 16 of its cities. Lawmakers said redevelopment was siphoning off too much property tax money away from schools and other public services.

The law mandates the formation of an oversight board for every former redevelopment agency. The members will decide how to dispose of the assets, pay off the bills and restore money as quickly as possible to cities, schools, fire and other special districts.

Membership ranges from elected officials to former redevelopment agency employees to representatives of the county board of education and the public.

The Contra Costa Board of Supervisors’ appointment list is massive:

  • Two people each to oversight boards in 16 Contra Costa cities.
  • One person each to represent the Contra Costa Fire District in eight cities, where the district is the largest special district. (The board of supervisors is the district’s governing board.)
  • Four people to the county’s former redevelopment agency oversight board.

Eligibility requirements vary but most of the open posts call for a member of the public who is not an elected official and require residency in the city or district in which the individual seeks to represent.

The time commitment also varies. Some former redevelopment agencies were larger than others and will take longer to unwind.

Supervisors will directly appoint some of the posts while the full board will select others.

Applications should be returned by noon on March 20 to the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors, Room 106, County Administration Building, 651 Pine St., Martinez CA 94553.

A Board of Supervisors’ committee will conduct interviews on March 26 at 9 a.m. at the county administration building.

For questions or to request an application form, call 925-335-1900 or visit www.co.contra-costa.ca.us. Residents may also contact county staffer Tim Ewell at 925-335-1036 or timothy.ewell@cao.cccounty.us.

 

 

Posted on Wednesday, March 14th, 2012
Under: Contra Costa Board of Supervisors, Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics, redevelopment | No Comments »

CoCo supervisors meeting: What goes on here?

One of my adult children asked me the other day, “What do you do at those county supervisor meetings?”

Nothing like hearing from a person with a real life to put your life’s work into perspective.

Nonetheless, I promised to explain the experience.

So, at this moment, I am blogging from the press table at the Board of Supervisors’ chambers in Martinez.

What is going on? I’ll update this list as the day unfolds. But the agenda lacks obvious controversy. I don’t attend if the items don’t look promising but today’s offerings include a discussion about the unfunded liability for the retiree health benefits of county employees and an update on a proposed fire district tax for the November ballot. Government is very often an incremental experience and there are few substitutes for actually hearing the information first-hand.

  • Supervisor Gayle Uilkema makes her first appearance at a board meeting since fell ill with pneumonia. She is being treated for cancer and the pneumonia was an unwanted complication. But she looked and sounded good. She joked about the wheelchair, saying she “loved being driven around.”
  • Presentation commemorating Girl Scouts week. The young Scouts were adorable in their uniforms and they handed out green re-usable water bottles. (I was hoping for Girl Scout cookies.)
  • Honored retired county emergency medical services director Art Lathrop, who was selected state EMS administrator of the year from the California Emergency Services Authority.
  • Declared March “Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Month” and heard a heart-breaking story from a mother whose son died after an overdose.
  • Heard the 2011 annual report from the county’s Mental Health Commission.
  • The poetry reading was unexpected. Gadfly Ralph Hoffmann complained that a man by the name of Joel Barker stole some lines from one of his copyrighted poems and asked the county attorney to investigate. And yes, he read the poem out loud.
  • Ellen Smith (not Wilson, sorry, there are two transportation guru Ellens!) from BART delivers update on planning for eBART out to East Contra Costa County. She may also have a career in stand-up if the transit gig flops.  Staff turned out all the lights when Wilson started her slideshow and when Supervisor Mary Nejedly Piepho asked if Ellen could read her notes in the dark, she didn’t miss a beat. “Yes, my notes are in Braille.” BART is working on right of way but still doesn’t have money for construction.
  • A bit of good financial news:  The county has cut its unfunded liability for retiree health care to $968 million. It was $2.6 billion in 2006. The number matters because the higher the figure, the higher the number of dollars the county must contribute each year out of its general purpose funds toward paying it off over a 30-year period. Six year ago, the county’s payment was $216 million. This fiscal year, it was $59.8 million. The drop is the result, among other things, of cuts in county employee benefits.
  • The board dealt with a handful of abatements, those pay-up orders to landowners who fail to clean up their properties and the county does it for them. The county has spent quite a bit of time trying to clean up areas in the Delta such as Bethel Island.
  • Board goes into closed session — where they also eat lunch — and will return at 1:30 p.m. for a meeting as the Contra Costa Fire District Board and Housing Authority.
  • Supervisor Federal Glover is gone today. He’s in Washington, D.C., for conferences including the National Association of Counties.
  • Housing Authority meeting cancelled. No quorum.
  • Supervisors convene as the Contra Costa Fire Protection District board. They hear that the department is crafting contingency plans in the event the Rodeo-Hercules fire district shuts one of its two stations after April 1 and/or if East Contra Costa Fire Protection District residents fail to pass an annual $197 per parcel tax measure on the June 5 ballot. Fire districts operate under mutual aid agreements and when one agency cuts service, it impacts its neighbors.
  • Starting with public comment and continuing with the county supervisors, Confire Chief Daryl Louder is repeatedly asked to provide more back-up documents and meatier staff reports with the agenda. “This is Government Sunshine Week. Let’s have more sunshine,” said Kris Hunt with the Contra Costa Taxpayers Association. Hey, it’s still better than most of the items on the last fire board agenda, which had no staff reports.
  • The county’s proposal to provide contract fire and emergency medical services to Pinole failed to include the cost of retiree health care and must be revised, supervisors told Chief Louder. ConFire and the Rodeo-Hercules district are competing for the deal. “We need to tell Pinole as soon as possible because they are relying on these figures to make policy decisions,” Supervisor John Gioia said.
  • News happening with the proposed parcel tax for ConFire and the impacts if it doesn’t pass in November …
  • I’m off to write dailies.
  • And here is what I just filed:  http://www.contracostatimes.com/news/ci_20166759/contra-costa-fire-district-needs-90-parcel-tax

Posted on Tuesday, March 13th, 2012
Under: Contra Costa Board of Supervisors, Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics | 5 Comments »

CoCo Supervisor Uilkema returns to public life after illness

Contra Costa County Supervisor Gayle Uilkema returned to the board chambers for the first time since she became ill with pneumonia in January.

The Lafayette lawmaker has been fighting cancer for the past year and the pneumonia was a complication of her treatment.

No one loves this job more than Gayle, who will retire this year after 15 years on the board.

“I really miss you guys, all of you,” she told me before the meeting started. (Yes, I think she even meant me!)

Gayle says she plans to ramp back up into public life using the slow lane, attending meetings for an hour or two until she works her way back up to a full schedule.

 

 

Posted on Tuesday, March 13th, 2012
Under: Contra Costa Board of Supervisors, Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics | 1 Comment »

Filing deadline passes and East Bay ballots firm up

The 5 p.m. filing deadline today has come and gone and election clerks in the East Bay have delivered their promised preliminary candidate and ballot lists.

Check out the list below for Contra Costa, Alameda and portions of Solano County. There are a few surprises, including a fair number of entirely uncontested races. (The women rule here, as you’ll see.)

My favorite development is the similarity between the name of incumbent Democratic state Sen. Mark DeSaulnier and his Republican challenger Mark Meuser. The Marks might want to hand out reading glasses to voters in the hopes the magnification effect will help them choose the right one.

Voters in a dozen cities, school and fire districts will also find requests for new taxes on their ballots. While no one wants to pay more, residents are far more likely to support local measures because they feel the money will stay closer to home.

The following individuals and ballot measures had qualified for the June 5 ballot as of information available late today. (i) denotes incumbent. (Keep in mind, election clerks may still be processing applications from those who filed at the last minute.)

(Ed. Note: I’ve updated this at 4:30 p.m. Saturday — Josh)

CONGRESS

District 3: John Garamendi, Dem. (i); Kim Vann, Rep.; Eugene Ray, Rep., Rick Tubbs, Rep.

District 5: Mike Thompson, Dem., (i); Randy Loftin, Rep.; John Cilley, Rep.

District 9: Jerry McNerney, Dem., (i); John McDonald, Rep.; Ricky Gill, Rep.

District 11: George Miller, Dem. (i); Cheryl Sudduth, Dem.; John Fitzgerald, Dem.; Virginia Fuller, Rep.

District 13: Barbara Lee, Dem. (i); Marilyn Singleton, nonpartisan; Justin Jelincic, Dem.

District 15: Fortney “Pete” Stark, Dem. (i); Eric Swalwell, Dem.; Christopher Pareja, nonpartisan.

District 17: Mike Honda, Dem. (i); Charles Richardson, Lib.; Evelyn Li, Dem.

STATE SENATE

District 3: Lois Wolk, Dem. (i)

District 7: Mark DeSaulnier, Dem. (i); Mark Meuser, Rep.

District 9: Loni Hancock, Dem. (i)

ASSEMBLY

District 11: (No incumbent) Jim Frazier, Dem.; Patricia Hernandez, Dem.; Gene Gantt, Dem.; Len Augustine, nonpartisan; Mike Hudson, Rep., Charles Kingeter, Dem.

District 14: Susan Bonilla, Dem. (i)

District 15: Nancy Skinner, Dem. (i)

District 16: Joan Buchanan, Dem. (i); Al Phillips, Rep.

District 18: (No incumbent) Rob Bonta, Dem.; Joel Young, Dem.; Abel Guillen, Dem., Rhonda Weber, Rep.

District 20: (No incumbent) Bill Quirk, Dem.; Jennifer Ong, Dem.; Sarabjit Cheema, Dem.; Luis Reynoso, Rep.; Mark Green, nonpartisan

District 25: Bob Wieckowski, Dem. (i)

ALAMEDA COUNTY (nonpartisan races)

Board of Supervisors, District 1: Scott Haggerty (i)

Board of Supervisors, District 4: Nate Miley (i); Tojo Thomas

Board of Supervisors, District 5: Keith Carson (i)

Hayward City Council (four seats): Barbara Halliday (i), Francisco Zermeno (i), Olden Henson, (i), Al Mendall, Greg Jones, Fahim Ajaz Khan, Ralph Farias Jr. and Peter Bufete. (Filing deadline extended to March 14 as one of the incumbents did not seek re-election.)

Board of Education, District 2: None

Board of Education, District 3: Ken Berrick (i)

Board of Education, District 4: None

Board of Education, District 5: Frederick Sims (i)

Board of Education, District 6: Eileen McDonald (i)

Zone 7 (three seats): Sandy Figuers (i); Dick Quigley (i)

Union Sanitary District, Ward 1: Manuel Fernandez (i)

Union Sanitary District, Ward 2: Patricia Kite (i)

Union Sanitary District, Ward 3: Anjali Lathi (i)

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY (nonpartisan)

Board of Supervisors, District 2: Sean White of Lafayette, Candace Andersen of Danville; and Tomi Van de Brooke of Orinda. (Filing deadline extended to March 14 as incumbent Gayle Uilkema did not seek re-election.)

Board of Supervisors, District 3: Mary Nejedly Piepho of Discovery Bay (i)

Board of Supervisors, District 5: Federal Glover of Pittsburg (i)

CONTRA COSTA BALLOT MEASURES

Antioch Unified School District: $59.5 million bond measure for school facility upgrades. Requires 55 percent voter approval.

Antioch: Two measures. One seeks to change city clerk and treasurer from elected to appointed position. The other would convert elected mayor to a rotating position from among members of the City Council. Both require majority approval.

Crockett Community Services District: Increase in the $50 recreation per parcel tax to $110 for maintenance of the area’s parks. Two-thirds vote required.

East Contra Costa Fire Protection District: Annual $197 per parcel tax to maintain fire service. Two-thirds vote required.

Hercules: Two measures. One seeks voter approval to sell the city’s electric company and requires a two-thirds vote. The second is an emergency funding proposal for a four-year, 1/2-cent sales tax to maintain city services in the wake of a deficit. Majority approval required.

Pittsburg: A 10-year sales tax (1/2 cent for first five years, 1/4 cent in the second five years) to raise money for city services. Majority approval required.

San Pablo: A 10-year sales tax (1/2 cent for first five years, 1/4 cent in the second five years) to raise money for city services. Majority approval required.

West Contra Costa Unified School District: Five-year renewal and increase in parcel tax. Requires two-thirds vote.

ALAMEDA COUNTY BALLOT MEASURES

Peralta Community College District: Eight-year annual $48 per parcel tax. The funds would be used to preserve 1,900 classes a year at the college serving students from Oakland, Alameda, Piedmont, Berkeley, Albany and Emeryville. Requires two-thirds vote.

Dublin Unified School District: $99 million school bond measure to build and improve classrooms, buildings and equipment. Requires 55 percent voter approval.

Hayward Unified School District: Annual $58 per parcel tax for school operations. Two-thirds vote required.

New Haven Unified School District (Hayward): Four-year annual $180 per parcel tax to fund school operations. It is similar to a measure that failed last May. Two-thirds vote required.

City of Alameda: A 30-year half-cent sales tax increase to fund library improvements, replace aging police and fire vehicles and construct a new emergency center. Two-thirds vote required.

SOLANO COUNTY

Countywide: Would extend existing one-eighth of 1 percent library tax for 16 years to fund ongoing operations. Majority approval required.

Board of Supervisors, District 1 (no incumbent): Susan Anthony, Erin Hannigan, Tony Intintoli Jr., Lee Simmons.

Board of Supervisors, District 2: Steve Messina, Linda Seifert (i)

Board of Supervisors, District 5: Mike Reagan (i); Skip Thomson

 

Posted on Friday, March 9th, 2012
Under: 2012 primary election, Alameda County, Alameda County Board of Supervisors, ballot measures, Contra Costa Board of Supervisors, Contra Costa County, Contra Costa politics | 28 Comments »

Brown names CoCo sheriff to boating commission

Gov. Jerry Brown today appointed Contra Costa Sheriff David Livingston to the California Boating and Waterways Commission.

Livingston, 47, became sheriff last year; his predecessor, Warren Rupf, served on the commission as well. Livingston earlier was Concord’s police chief from 2005 to 2011; Pleasant Hill’s police chief from 2002 to 2005; and a Fremont police officer from 1987 to 2002. He holds a law degree from the University of San Francisco, and declined to state a party affiliation. The appointment requires state Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem.

The seven-member commission advises the state Department of Boating and Waterways, which exists to help develop convenient public access to the state’s waterways and promote on-the-water safety with programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax revenue and boating facility construction loan payments.

Also Friday, Gov. Jerry Brown appointed Chanee Franklin Minor, 35, of Oakland, to the Fair Employment and Housing Commission. Franklin Minor has been a staff attorney at the City of Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board since 2011. Earlier, she was an associate at Cooley Godward Kronish LLP from 2006 to 2009 and a staff attorney at the Eviction Defense Center in 2006. Franklin Minor holds a law degree from Cornell University, and is registered to vote as a Democrat. The appointment requires state Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem.

The FEHC is a quasi-judicial administrative agency which enforces California civil rights laws regarding discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations; pregnancy disability leave; family and medical leave; and hate violence.

Posted on Friday, March 9th, 2012
Under: Contra Costa County, Jerry Brown, Uncategorized | 2 Comments »