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Study: Young men with sisters tend toward GOP

Young men with sisters are more likely to be Republicans, according to a new study by researchers from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and Loyola Marymount University.

The research by Stanford’s Neil Malhotra and Loyola’s Andrew Healy indicates men who grew up with female siblings tend to be conservative in their views of gender throughout their lives, and more likely to vote Republican when they’re young than their male peers. One reason may be that they’re much less likely to share household chores with their sisters, an avoidance of housework that continues into adulthood.

Wait, what? Republican men don’t do dishes?

not a Young Republican“Researchers have known that families have a strong influence on their children’s political ideas. But families are complicated, and it’s been hard to pinpoint how that socialization happens,” Malhotra said in a news release. “Our breakthrough is understanding that mechanism.”

Watching their sisters do the chores “teaches” boys that housework is simply women’s work, and that leads to a traditional view of gender roles — a position linked to a predilection for Republican politics, Healy and Malhotra claim. Boys with all sisters were 13.5 percent more conservative in their views of women’s roles than boys with all brothers.

When the boys with female siblings were seniors in high school, they were nearly 15 percent more likely to identify as Republicans, but as they grew into middle age, that effect diminished sharply. On the other hand, having sisters instead of brothers has no significant effect on girls, Healy and Malhotra found. Other researchers have found that people with traditional views on gender roles are 25 percent more politically conservative.

“These effects were surprising to us. We might expect that boys would learn to support gender equity through interactions with their sisters,” Healy said in the release. “However, the data suggest that other forces are more important in driving men’s political attitudes, including whether the family assigned chores, such as dishwashing, according to traditional gender roles.”

The researchers base their conclusions on an analysis of data gathered for two earlier studies: the University of Michigan Political Socialization Panel (PSP) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) young-adult sample.

Those studies followed thousands of U.S. families and individuals over an extended period, and probed for attitudes about gender and politics, as well as the inner workings of their households. The studies were conducted separately and at different times, but the findings were strikingly similar. Because the two studies point in the same direction, Malhotra said, he’s all the more confident that the conclusions he and Healy reached are valid.

The PSP study began in 1965 as a national sample of 1,669 students from 97 public and private schools, most of them high school seniors, and their parents. Subsequent surveys of the same individuals were conducted in 1973, 1982, and 1997; by the time of the last survey, the former students were about 50 years old.

The NLSY survey, conducted by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, included interviews with children as young as 10. They were asked if they regularly helped with straightening out their room, keeping the rest of the house clean, doing the dishes, and cooking. Over the years, questions about political views were added to the NLSY. When that data was correlated with that from the PSP, Healy and Malhotra concluded that “the gender stereotyping of the childhood environment thus may help to explain the effects that sisters have on male political attitudes.”

Their paper, “Childhood Socialization and Political Attitudes: Evidence from a Natural Experiment,” will be published in the October issue of the Journal of Politics.

Posted on Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013
Under: Republican politics | 4 Comments »

GOP consultants form Latino-focused polling firm

Here’s another sign that California Republicans are stepping up their efforts to attract Latino voters: Two well-known consultants are teaming up to create a Latino-focused polling firm.

Latino Edge Research’s principals are billing their new venture as “the only all Latino Republican survey research firm,” which “provides the insight and understanding of Latino voters so that messaging will reach them, persuade them and activate them.”

John Nienstedt, whose Competitive Edge Research & Communication is based in San Diego, will be Latino Edge’s research director while Hector Barajas – who has held top communications jobs for the California Republican Party, the Republican National Committee, 2010 gubernatorial nominee Meg Whitman and the state Senate Republican Caucus – will be in charge of message development. Barajas most recently has worked at Revolvis, and Latino Edge reportedly will be run out of CERC’s and Revolvis’ existing offices.

“Latino Edge focuses exclusively on Latino and Hispanic voters, diving deep into this diverse community to understand the values, language and priorities necessary to develop winning center-right messages,” the new firm’s news release said.

This news comes just a few months after GROW Elect – a group founded in 2011 to recruit, endorse, train and fund Latino Republican candidates in California – announced it had hired former Bush White House aide and former San Mateo County Supervisor Ruben Barrales as its first president and CEO. Barrales reportedly has thrown himself into the job, including doing some face-time and fundraising with Republicans across the state; case in point, he’ll be joining state GOP Chairman Jim Brulte this Friday, May 10, at the San Mateo County Republican Party’s Lincoln Day Dinner, and next Thursday at the Alameda County Republican Party’s leadership dinner.

Posted on Monday, May 6th, 2013
Under: Republican Party, Republican politics | No Comments »

Lots of upcoming GOP fundraisers in Bay Area

A slew of Republican fundraising events are scheduled all over the Bay Area in coming weeks.

Tomorrow, Tuesday, April 30, former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice will headline a fundraiser for Long Beach mayoral candidate Damon Dunn, the NFL-player-turned-businessman who was the 2010 Republican nominee for secretary of state. Tickets to the 6 p.m. reception at Sharon Heights Country Club in Menlo Park start at $250 each.

Next Tuesday, May 7, John Herrington – U.S. Secretary of Energy during the Reagan administration and a former state GOP chairman – and Contra Costa Republican Party Chairwoman Becky Kolberg will co-host a reception honoring California Republican Party Chairman Jim Brulte. Tickets for the 5:30-to-7:30 p.m. event at Vic Stewart’s, 850 S. Broadway in Walnut Creek, cost $25 each and are available online.

Brulte has more Bay Area appearances coming in May.

Jim BrulteOn Friday, May 10, Brulte will keynote the San Mateo County Republican Party’s Lincoln Day Dinner, joined also by Ruben Barrales of Grow Elect – a GOP Latino outreach entity. Singer Diana Nagy will provide musical entertainment for the 7-to-9 p.m. event at the Elks Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave. in San Mateo. Tickets for the dinner cost $49, or $250 with a VIP reception, and are available online; sponsorships range from $1,000 to $5,000.

On Wednesday, May 15, Brulte and Assembly Republican Leader Connie Conway, R-Visalia, will headline the Santa Clara County Republican Party’s Lincoln Reception at Lexus of Stevens Creek, 3333 Stevens Creek Blvd. in Santa Clara; other special guests include former Lt. Gov. Abel Maldanado, former Rep. Ernie Konnyu, former Assemblyman Jim Cunneen and various county and local officials. Tickets to the 6 p.m. VIP reception cost $250, while tickets to the 7 p.m. general reception cost $45; all are available online. Sponorships cost from $1,000 to $10,000.

And on Thursday, May, 16, Brulte and California Republican Party Vice Chair Harmeet Dhillion will be at the Alameda County Republican Party’s leadership dinner, also joined by Barrales and honorary co-host Pleasanton Mayor Jerry Thorne. The event will be at the Pleasanton Marriott Hotel, 11950 Dublin Canyon Road; tickets including admission to a 6 p.m. VIP reception cost $150 while the 7 p.m. dinner by itself is $60, and all are available online.

Posted on Monday, April 29th, 2013
Under: Republican Party, Republican politics | No Comments »

RNC votes unanimously against same-sex marriage

Rebranding only goes so far. From Time magazine:

The Republican National Committee voted unanimously Friday to reaffirm the party’s commitment to upholding the definition of marriage as between one man and one woman, upending party efforts to grow support among younger voters.

A resolution introduced Wednesday by Michigan committeeman Dave Agema, who came under fire last month for posting an article describing gays as “filthy” on his Facebook page, passed the full RNC by a voice vote and without debate. A second resolution reaffirming “core values” of the party — including opposition to same-sex marriage — was also passed.

[snip]

Republican Party officials bristle at coverage of the controversy. “While we have to do things differently, there’s one thing that can’t and won’t change: our principles,” said RNC chairman Reince Priebus.

Evan Wolfson, president and founder of Freedom to Marry, was quick on the draw with a statement.

“With Republican support for the freedom to marry increasing every day — aided by the journeys of leaders like Senators Mark Kirk and Rob Portman — the RNC is showing itself out of touch with this resolution,” he said. “A party that claims to value individual freedom, personal responsibility, family stability, and limited government should be embracing the freedom to marry, as have a growing majority of young Republicans. RNC leaders would do well to align themselves with these supporters, who represent the party’s future, instead of digging in against the right side of history.”

But I’d be shocked if Wolfson or anyone else seriously thought the RNC wouldn’t pass such a resolution.

Posted on Friday, April 12th, 2013
Under: Republican Party, Republican politics, same-sex marriage | 6 Comments »

Pertaining to the GOP and strippers

Here is an open letter that Democratic National Committee member and longtime California Democratic Party advisor Bob Mulholland sent yesterday to national and state Republican officials:

Bob Mulholland
Chico, Ca
DNC Member
April 8, 2013

To: Reince Priebus
RNC Chair
Fax (202) 863-8773 (RNC)
Jim Brulte
Ca Republican Party Chair
Fax (916) 266-4580 (Ca Strategies)

They’re Not in Kansas on Wednesday

Just some friendly advice since you have a RNC meeting on Wednesday (9AM) at the Loews Hollywood Hotel, located at 1755 North Highland Ave.

Your meeting is only a 2.3 mile Taxi ride to the Voyeur West Hollywood Club, an erotic bondage-theme sex simulating club, located at 7969 Santa Monica Blvd. in W. Hollywood, so you might want to assign Monitors (or GPS anchor bracelets) on your RNC Members, especially those from Kansas, Nebraska, Idaho, etc., if they don’t have their wives with them.

Just ask former RNC Chair, Michael Steele, who tried to explain why the RNC paid $1,946.25 for an “outing” at the Voeur (2/4/10) by RNC people. Never did read if the RNC was reimbursed for that wild night of “relaxation.”

Stick to your meetings and avoid the “extra entertainment” options.

However, if some members need to get out and “experience” a Club, not seen at home in Kansas, Bruce Herschensohn and I would recommend the Seventh Veil at 7180 Sunset Blvd in Hollywood. Bruce always thought it was a discreet Club, and less than a mile from your meeting.

Sincerely,

Bob Mulholland

Posted on Tuesday, April 9th, 2013
Under: Democratic Party, Democratic politics, Republican Party, Republican politics | 1 Comment »

GOP hires two to boost Asian-American outreach

The Republican National Committee is stepping up its outreach to Asian-American and Pacific Islander voters, as it becomes increasingly apparent that they’re a crucial swing vote in battleground states and districts across the nation.

They’re trying to catch up with Democrats, and polls show the GOP needs to move fast as AAPI voters have been leaning more and more heavily toward Democratic candidates.

RNC Chairman Reince Priebus today announced Stephen Fong as the committee’s national Asian and Pacific Islander field director and Jason Chung as its national communications director for Asian and Pacific Islander engagement.

Stephen FongPriebus said Fong – a longtime Republican operative originally from California, and a former president of the San Francisco Log Cabin Republicans – “brings with him a wealth of knowledge and experience, particularly at the grassroots level, which will be invaluable in building our new and unprecedented community-based field operation to engage with all voters.”

Fong has “extensive experience working with minority groups and observing Democratic strategies and tactics in the nation’s most diverse state,” according to the GOP’s news release. From 2001 to 2008, he was special assistant at the U.S. Department of Transportation under President George W. Bush working on government affairs, public affairs, and public policy for public transportation and congestion mitigation issues.

Chung has worked on behalf of Republican candidates for 15 years in Connecticut, Maryland, and Virginia; most recently, he was a principal for the Livingston Group and Gateway Consulting. Earlier, he was a congressional liaison in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and executive director of the Maryland Governor’s Office on Asian Pacific American Affairs under Gov. Bob Ehrlich.

That latter experience “in particular will help us better address the concerns of this diverse and growing community, and his contacts and experience in Virginia politics will be crucial ahead of the elections this fall,” Priebus said in the news release.

“It’s no secret that Republicans have ground to make up among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders,” he added. “To earn voters’ trust, we must be present in their communities. Stephen will lead a team of individuals hired by the RNC and rooted in the communities they serve to engage people where they live, work, and worship. Jason will lead the media planning and strategy for the entire Asian and Pacific Islander media, while also overseeing the creation of an RNC Asian Pacific surrogate program.”

Both men also will work closely with the RNC’s overall political and communications teams.

Posted on Tuesday, April 9th, 2013
Under: Republican Party, Republican politics | No Comments »

California Latino GOP group steps up its game

Former Bush White House aide Ruben Barrales – also a former San Mateo County supervisor, and a child of Mexican immigrants – will be the first president and CEO of GROW Elect, a group founded in 2011 to recruit, endorse, train and fund Latino Republican candidates in California.

The organization says Barrales’ hiring is part of an aggressive expansion of its plan and a dramatic increase in its funding.

Ruben BarralesBarrales for six years served as President George W. Bush’s Director of Intergovernmental Affairs, the White House’s senior representative to state, local, territorial and tribal government officials. He liaisoned with governors, mayors, state legislators and other elected officials, and also separately served as a chairman of the President’s Task Force on Puerto Rico’s Status.

Barrales was elected to the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors in 1992 and served as the board’s president 1996. He ran for state controller in 1998 but lost to incumbent Democrat Kathleen Connell. He served as president and CEO of Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network, a San Jose-based public-private civic organization, from 1998 to 2001.

Most recently Barrales has served as the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce’s president and CEO – the largest regional chamber in California, with a full-time staff of 26 and an annual budget of $4 million.

GROW Elect has elected 30 Latino Republicans to local office across California since 2011, it says; among the successful candidates it supported in November were incumbent Milpitas Mayor Jose Esteves, incumbent Hercules City Councilman Dan Romero, Dublin-San Ramon Services Board Member Edward Duarte, and incumbent Hayward Unified School District Trustee Luis Reynoso.

“GROW Elect has already made a difference in California,” Republican National Committee Co-Chairwoman Sharon Day said in the group’s news release. “With Ruben’s leadership it will take the recruitment and support of Latino Republican candidates to a new level.”

House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield, said in the news release that this news is “long overdue.”

“We all have a stake in the work of GROW and Ruben Barrales,” McCarthy said. “We are all better served when there is a vigorous and real two-party system, with candidates vying for the votes of, and seeking to represent, all Californians. I’m grateful for Ruben’s dedication to both empowering the Latino community, and strengthening the Republican Party, in California.”

State Senate Republican Leader Bob Huff, R-Walnut, congratulated Barrales as well and said GROW Elect “has done tremendous work in electing Latino Republicans to local office and I look forward to continuing my involvement with this organization.”

Posted on Thursday, February 21st, 2013
Under: Republican Party, Republican politics | 3 Comments »

Protesters to target Chris Christie in Palo Alto

Protesters intend to besiege Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s home tomorrow while New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is there doing some social networking and campaign cash collection.

CREDO is organizing the protest at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday outside 1456 Edgewood Ave. in Palo Alto. Activists will be “protesting against Zuckerberg’s support for the governor, citing Christie’s repeated efforts to gut women’s reproductive health care services and defund Planned Parenthood,” according to a news release. Christie is seeking re-election this year, and is thought to be a prime contender for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016.

Organizers note that although more than 58 percent of Facebook users are women, Christie defunded Planned Parenthood by cutting $7.4 million from women’s health care, including funding for life-saving cancer screenings, breast health exams and birth control. The $7.4 million in cuts led to the closures of six women’s health clinics in New Jersey.

Posted on Tuesday, February 12th, 2013
Under: campaign finance, Republican politics | 1 Comment »

“I only have eyes… for blue…” (Or red)

Don’t tell Mary Matalin and James Carville, but researchers have found that online daters time and time again choose to pursue romantic relationships with people from their own political party and with similar beliefs.

Stanford Graduate School of Business Associate Professor Neil Malhotra and Yale University political science Professor Gregory Huber analyzed thousands of interactions from an online dating website. Their findings, presented last fall in a research paper titled “Political Sorting in Social Relationships,” show political affiliation rivals education level as one of the most important factors in identifying potential mates.

“We underestimate how much politics affects our daily lives,” Malhotra said in a news release issued Monday. “After an election is over, we don’t think about it, but in fact our political affiliations strongly affect other aspects of our lives, such as our romantic choices.”

And that has important implications beyond the households that politically similar individuals may form, he says.

“At the highest levels within our political system, we increasingly see that people are unwilling to work and communicate with each other,” he said. “Simply put, our society has become more and more polarized, and we wanted to explore if political preferences in romantic relationships could begin to explain part of the divide in America.”

So, Democrats – take a Republican out to dinner this Valentine’s Day. You’ll be striking a blow for bipartisan cooperation and the future of the Republic. And hey, you might get lucky, too.

When people pair with individuals of similar political beliefs, their households can become echo chambers that transmit extreme views to the children, Malhotra said. In fact, research shows that children are more moderate if their parents have differing political viewpoints. There is a genetic story at play, as well: Studies of twins demonstrate a genetic predisposition for certain political beliefs, which suggests that offspring of like-minded individuals may be predisposed to more extreme beliefs.

So Malhotra and Huber launched a laboratory experiment in which they presented participants with online dating profiles. Participants evaluated profiles more positively (e.g. had greater interest in dating the targeted individual) when the target had their same political ideology and level of interest in politics. Study participants even found online candidate profiles more physically attractive if they shared similar political beliefs.

Gipper loveTo validate these results, the researchers partnered with an online dating website, which provided the team a unique window to observe people’s beliefs and preferences before they meet and interact in a marriage market. It also provided a wealth of data since, according to a Pew Research study, 74 percent of single Americans seeking partners have used an online dating site.

The team developed a set of seven new questions that users were asked when signing up for the online dating service. The questions measured three different political characteristics: political identity, including party affiliation; issue positions; and political participation. Most users opted to keep their answers to these questions private, meaning that other users could not proactively search for potential mates using these criteria.

Still, after assessing how men and women interacted via the site’s messaging function, Malhotra and Huber found that — in line with the results from the lab study — shared political characteristics increased the messaging rates in statistically significant ways above a baseline rate. Shared partisanship increased messaging rates by 9.5 percent, shared levels of political interest increased messaging rates by 10.7 percent, and shared ideas about how to balance the budget increased messaging rates by 10.8 percent.

These are similar to the messaging boosts found from shared educational background and height; slightly lower than race; and lower than religion. But since political characteristics were not disclosed — unlike these other publicly disclosed characteristics — it shows “how strong the political effect is, and how easy it is for people to pick up on cues about political beliefs,” Malhotra said.

Malhotra said their findings indicate reduced political disagreement within households, which can lead to the rise of political enclaves, which means “partisan polarization could get much worse.”

Posted on Monday, February 11th, 2013
Under: Democratic politics, Republican politics | No Comments »

3 things for the GOP to consider in California

1.) Learn to choose better battles.

Every cycle, the National Republican Congressional Committee tells us that Rep. Jerry McNerney, D-Stockton, is among the nation’s most vulnerable House Democrats; every cycle, he proves otherwise. In 2008, with a 1-point voter registration disadvantage, he won by 10 percentage points; in 2010, with a .32-point voter-registration disadvantage, he won by 1.1 percentage points; and this year, with a 12-point voter-registration edge, he won by 8 percentage points. Instead of pouring resources into the campaign of a 25-year-old with no job experience, perhaps the GOP should’ve looked for greener pastures.

2.) Your navel-gazing is near-sighted.

California Republican Party Chairman Tom Del Beccaro’s statement last night indicates he believes Romney and Republicans failed to “make the case, at every level, for tax reform and to successfully articulate that a welfare state can’t succeed and the true engine of growth is a vigorous free enterprise system.” I’m sure some Democrats will disagree with the philosophical underpinnings of that argument, and that’s not a debate I’ll get into here. But what Del Beccaro failed to address was that the GOP clearly lost big among Latinos, Asian-Americans, African-Americans and young voters – that is, most of this nation’s future electorate. If his party can’t find platform that appeals to these blocs, and an effective way of explaining it to them, it’ll continue to wane even further. Already I see some GOPers sniffing that Obama won without a mandate, but the fact is, he won the popular vote by at least about 2.7 million and – if Florida were to stop counting votes now (and where have I heard THAT before?) – he’d win there too, meaning he carried every battleground state except North Carolina.

3.) Who has the mandate?

Gov. Jerry Brown has the mandate. He won it in 2010 when he beat out the candidate who spent a record $142 million of her money to no avail. He won it again last night with a resounding 8-point victory for Prop. 30, his tax hike for K-12 and higher education. And it seems voters are tired enough of gridlock in Sacramento that they may have handed Democrats two-thirds majorities in both houses of the Legislature – another mandate, of sorts, for Brown’s agenda. The moral of this story: Don’t mess with Jerry.

Posted on Wednesday, November 7th, 2012
Under: 2012 Congressional Election, 2012 presidential election, Jerry Brown, Jerry McNerney, Republican Party, Republican politics, U.S. House | 5 Comments »