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Steve Cooley concedes AG race to Kamala Harris

Republican nominee and Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley has conceded the race for state attorney general to Democratic nominee and San Francisco District Attorney Kamala Harris.

Steve Cooley“While the margin is extremely narrow and ballots are still being counted, my campaign believes that we cannot make up the current gap in the vote count for Attorney General. Therefore, I am formally conceding the race and congratulate Ms. Harris on becoming California’s next Attorney General.

“We started this campaign late but we won an exceptionally tough Republican primary by a decisive margin. In the general election, we emerged as California’s top Republican vote getter and carried 39 out of the state’s 58 counties. We also cut by more than half the margin of loss by the GOP ticket in heavily Democratic Los Angeles County. It was gratifying to have received the votes of over 4 million Californians.

“It is unfortunate that someone who is a non-partisan non-politician could not overcome the increasingly partisan tendencies of the state, even for an office that by its nature necessitates a non-partisan approach.

“I take great pride in the fact that I received the endorsement of every law enforcement organization in this race as well as that of every major daily newspaper in California but one. I was particularly gratified to receive the support of so many fellow district attorneys. While my campaign team tells me that endorsements do not necessarily win elections – and the results confirm that – it still means a great deal to me on a personal level.

“I thank my supporters and my campaign team for all they did and the sacrifices they made during this past year. We had many old friends – and made many new ones across the state – who stepped up to help our campaign. My campaign team did an exceptional job guiding someone who had never previously thought of running for statewide office through two very difficult elections.

“I will complete my third term and finish my career as a professional prosecutor in the office where it began over 37 years ago. I take great satisfaction in being able to still work with the tremendous professionals who do such an outstanding job in the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office. I look forward to continuing to serve the people of Los Angeles County as District Attorney with the same commitment and enthusiasm I have always demonstrated.

“The campaign was a fascinating and very positive experience. I advocated for the issues in which I believed in and proposed reforms California needs during these difficult times. I will continue to do the same as District Attorney for the County of Los Angeles.”

“District Attorney Harris thanks District Attorney Cooley for a spirited campaign and looks forward to working together on the critical public safety challenges facing California,” Harris campaign manager Brian Brokaw said in an e-mailed statement. “The counties continue to tabulate votes, and District Attorney Harris believes it is only appropriate to wait until all the votes are counted before making a public declaration. She will be holding a press conference on Tuesday, November 30, the deadline for counties to report final counts to the Secretary of State.”

Posted on Wednesday, November 24th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, Attorney General, Kamala Harris, Steve Cooley | 3 Comments »

Cooley’s lead widens, but Harris isn’t worried

Republican Steve Cooley’s lead over Democrat Kamala Harris in the race for state attorney general has widened to 44,058 votes, or half a percentage point of all those cast, according to the secretary of state’s latest update at 9:14 a.m. this morning.

But Harris’ campaign warns against drawing any conclusions from the daily changes in the vote count.

“Basically what you’re looking at is heavily skewed reporting from good Cooley counties and a lot of our best performing counties have yet to report in any significant numbers,” spokesman Brian Brokaw said a few minutes ago.

Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties posted a lot of late returns over the weekend, he said. But while Orange County might account for 8 to 9 percent of the state’s vote total when all is said and done, it has accounted for about 25 percent of the late votes posted since Tuesday, pushing the numbers in Cooley’s direction.

So, Brokaw said, when big Democratic strongholds such as Los Angeles, San Francisco and Alameda counties finish counting their vote-by-mail and provisional ballots, Harris should regain the lead and finish on top.

UPDATE @ 4:01 P.M.: As of the 11:51 a.m. update to the secretary of state’s site, Cooley’s lead has been cut to 19,189 votes; Harris’ people tell me Santa Clara County helped her close the gap, and other Democrat-heavy counties are yet to come.

UPDATE @ 6:52 P.M.: And as of the 5:06 p.m. update, Cooley is up by 40,958.

Posted on Monday, November 8th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, Attorney General, Kamala Harris, Steve Cooley | 22 Comments »

Cooley widens lead over Harris in AG’s race

Republican Steve Cooley has widened his lead of Democrat Kamala Harris in the race for state attorney general, according to the vote-counting update filed to the secretary of state’s website at 12:49 a.m. this morning.

Cooley is up by 24,276 votes, about 0.3 percent of votes cast in the contest. That’s a tiny lead, but wider than any that has existed since Tuesday night; Harris had been up for a few days, and then Cooley pulled into the lead on Friday by 16,095 votes.

Harris’ lead in Cooley’s home Los Angeles County has increased in recent days from about 259,000 to 261,255. But Cooley has benefitted more as additional returns come in from conservative strongholds such as Orange and San Diego counties, as his campaign had suggested would happen.

There still are many ballots to be counted, so this is far from over, but it must be excruciating for the candidates and those who worked so hard on their campaigns.

Posted on Sunday, November 7th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, Attorney General, Kamala Harris, Steve Cooley | 10 Comments »

Slightly wider lead for Harris in AG race

As of 9 a.m. this morning, Democrat Kamala Harris led Republican Steve Cooley by 17,015 votes – 0.2 percent of those cast – in the race for state attorney general.

Tiny as it sounds, that’s a wider margin than we’ve seen at any point since Election Day. Early Wednesday afternoon, Harris led by about 14,800 votes; yesterday evening, Cooley’s campaign issued a memo saying the gap had closed to 9,364 votes.

The Cooley campaign’s memo was, predictably, confident of eventual success:

Steve is currently running almost 15 points ahead of Republican statewide registration and over 12 points above the top of the GOP ticket. Steve also cut by more than half the Democratic margin in LA County, which the rest of the ticket was losing by roughly 30 points or more.

Steve carried 40 out of California’s 58 counties. The significance of that number is that estimates show there are more ballots to be tabulated in counties carried by Steve Cooley rather than in those counties carried by Kamala Harris. For example, there are 74,000 more ballots to be counted in Orange and San Diego Counties, which Cooley carried, than in Los Angeles County.

There appear to be roughly 1.3 million or so absentee and provisional ballots to be counted. This is a huge number – particularly given that the AG’s race is essentially a tie.

The Cooley campaign is working with local election officials in key counties to monitor the vote tabulation. We are also working closely with legal counsel to be prepared for any and all potential developments.

Harris’ consultant, Ace Smith, was also involved in the extremely close Attorney General’s race which his father lost to Dan Lungren. During the vote tabulation for that race, Smith filed legal challenges – which ultimately were thrown out – to attempt to skew the result by disenfranchising voters in counties supportive of Lungren. We are prepared to fight any such manipulations of the ballot counting process by the Harris campaign.

Given the number of votes remaining, and where those votes are coming from, the Cooley campaign is optimistic about its chances. The numbers will fluctuate – perhaps quite a bit – because county registrars report and update numbers on different timelines. Several have told us they will not be finished until Thanksgiving and some may go until the official certification of the vote deadline of December 3rd. We expect no clear outcome for a minimum of two weeks. We will keep you updated.

All of which is true. But… it won’t matter how many counties Cooley carried; lots of statewide elected officials didn’t carry most of the counties. They carry the population centers, and Harris swept the Bay Area and Cooley’s home county of Los Angeles, the latter with a big, late surge that means the last-minute ballots yet to be counted are likely to break in her favor, her campaign says.

What’s indubitably true is that this race is far from over.

Posted on Friday, November 5th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, Attorney General, Kamala Harris, Steve Cooley, Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

Attorney general race still too close to call

Among statewide races, only that for attorney general remained too close to call Wednesday.

Republican Steve Cooley had declared victory late Tuesday night, but Democrat Kamala Harris surged in later returns and Cooley cancelled his Wednesday-morning news conference. By early this afternoon, Harris – who had been trailing in the polls but was seen closing the gap in the weeks leading up to Election Day – led Cooley by about 14,800 votes, or 0.2 percent of those cast.

In Cooley’s home county of Los Angeles, Harris led by about 259,000 votes, or 14.5 percent of those cast, a sign that her campaign blitzes there – including a tour of several African-American churches this past Sunday morning – might’ve helped turn the tide.

Harris campaign manager Ace Smith issued this memo a short while ago:

In spite of Steve Cooley’s Dewey-esque declaration of victory at 11:00 pm Tuesday night – which was followed six hours later by a cancellation of a Wednesday morning “victory” press conference – San Francisco District Attorney Kamala Harris will be the next Attorney General of the State of California. Here is why:
• With 100% of precincts reporting, Kamala Harris has won the Election Day count by 14,838 votes, 45.9% to 45.7%.
• Uncounted ballots will only bolster Kamala Harris’s lead, as they will reflect Harris’s strong Election Day advantage.
• Considering that Cooley jumped out to a 50% to 42% lead on Tuesday night thanks to early absentee ballots – and considering where the vote total ended up – our model shows that Kamala Harris clearly won the vote on Election Day by 3%. The provisional ballots cast on Tuesday will reflect Harris’s victory.
• The late absentee ballots will reflect Harris’s late surge in the race – which was captured both in public and private polling.

We will be providing updates on a regular basis in the coming days.

UPDATE @ 4 P.M.: “We are I think witnessing history, one of the most interesting upsets of conventional political wisdom in recent California history,” Smith said on a conference call with reporters just now. “We have every confidence that we are going to win this race.”

Smith said Los Angeles alone had 166,000 provisional ballots, 111,000 mail-in ballots that were physically dropped off at polling places Tuesday and 120,000 mail-in ballots that arrived in the mail just before the deadline. If the voting pattern Los Angelinos set at the polls Tuesday holds true for these additional, as-yet-uncounted ballots too, Harris will finish with a 60,000-vote margin, he said – a margin he attributes to “good old-fashioned hard work by the candidate,” although President Obama’s direct support definitely had a “positive effect” too.

“We’re not declaring victory, we’re not going to make the same mistake Steve Cooley did. We’re declaring our confidence,” Smith said.

Meanwhile, Cooley’s campaign issued this memo at about 3:30 p.m.:

“With the counties completing their semi-official returns, Steve Cooley trails Kamala Harris by 14,838 votes – two-tenths of a percentage point. There are over 1 million provisional and absentee ballots yet to be counted.”

“The race for Attorney General will not be decided for at least another couple of weeks and potentially could go until the official Certification of Vote deadline on December 3.”

“We will continue to monitor the situation. The only thing we are certain of is that the final outcome will be close. We are grateful for all the good wishes of our supporters and will keep you updated.”

Posted on Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010
Under: 2010 election, Attorney General, Kamala Harris, Steve Cooley | 3 Comments »

Harris takes aim at Cooley’s enviro record

San Francisco District Attorney Kamala Harris, the Democratic nominee for state attorney general, brought out a former Los Angeles prosecutor today to blast the record of Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley – the Republican nominee for AG – on prosecuting environmental crimes.

Matthew Monforton, a Los Angeles deputy district attorney from 1997 through 2006, said he resigned in protest over Cooley’s actions in cases where those suspected of environmental violations or political corruption were represented by attorney Robert Philibosian, a former Los Angeles District Attorney with whom Montforton says Cooley has “a very close personal relationship, a political relationship, and they also have a financial relationship.”

The LA Weekly reported on that relationship in 2006; here’s what it said about the example Monforton raised in today’s conference call with reporters:

In 2003, Deputy District Attorney Richard Sullivan was punished with a demeaning assignment for going public with concerns over the investigation of allegations of environmental crimes and perjury by the Newhall Land & Ranch Co. According to Monforton’s memo, Philibosian represented Newhall in the case. But when prosecutors, who suspected the company of lying about the presence of the endangered spineflower, sought a search warrant to obtain business records, Cooley blocked the effort and branded them “reckless and unethical,” according to the memo. No perjury investigation ever occurred. The company later paid a small fine.

“Mr. Cooley and Mr. Philibosian have been involved in what amounts to a protection racket” not only on Newhall but in other environmental and political corruption cases, Monforton alleged today.

Harris was on today’s call too, touting her own environmental protection record – she created an environmental justice unit within the San Francisco DA’s office to pursue cases such as illegal dumping, air pollution and poaching – and criticizing Cooley for declining to take a stance on Proposition 23, the ballot measure to roll back California’s greenhouse gas emissions law.

Cooley has said he’ll not take positions on ballot measures unrelated to public safety, Harris said, but he should realize that air quality and climate change are so related. “My opponent’s unwillingness or inability to stand up against Prop. 23 … speaks volumes about his priorities,” she said.

Cooley campaign spokesman Kevin Spillane said Cooley’s office never eliminated its environmental crimes unit, but merely consolidated it with the consumer protection unit; a dozen prosecutors work in that consolidated unit now, and have aggressively pursued cases of land, water and air pollution and other public health endangerments to win millions of dollars in settlements and fines.

As for Monforton, Spillane said, “He is a disgrunteled former employee who is an extreme conspiracy theorist, he had a troubled and erratic career in the district attorney’s office and he left under difficult circumstances. His obsession is actually not with Cooley but with Philibosian and Philibosian’s lawfirm, Sheppard Mullin – he has litigation pending against them currently … This gentleman basically was the office crank while he was there (in the DA’s office).”

Cooley has recused himself from the handful of matters involving Philibosian’s clients, Spillane said.

Posted on Thursday, October 14th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, Attorney General, Kamala Harris, Steve Cooley | 2 Comments »

Steve Cooley swipes at Jerry Brown, CARB chair

I spoke today with Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley, the Republican nominee for California attorney general, for an article on the AG’s race that we’ll run in the next few weeks. During that chat, he took a dual shot at current Attorney General Jerry Brown – also the Democratic gubernatorial nominee – and California Air Resources Board Chairwoman Mary Nichols.

Steve CooleyCooley was speaking about the role he believes the attorney general should take in setting and enforcing policies that don’t hinder job creation and economic development; he said businesses too often get negativity from state agencies and end up delaying their development or settling in other states as a result.

I asked him if he was saying the attorney general shouldn’t enforce the law of the land, including environmental protections and business code laws, especially as he’d just asserted to me the importance of the attorney general enforcing existing law as it pertains to same-sex marriage. He acknowledged the AG must enforce the law, but said those laws must be examined to make sure they’re applied in a fair, unbiased manner without conflicting messages between state agencies.

I noted that the AG’s office doesn’t necessarily have dominion over how all state agencies enforce the regulations they promulgate; as an example I cited the various bodies enforcing air-quality regulations. He seized upon that, and called out Brown for failing to dig into what he says could’ve been malfeasance at CARB.

In a nutshell, CARB staffer Hien Tran – who authored a statistical study on diesel soot effects on which the board was basing stringent, controversial new regulations – lied about where he’d obtained his Ph.D. Per the San Francisco Chronicle last December:

State researchers must redo a report that concluded 3,500 people prematurely die each year due to diesel pollution – a finding that was used to justify imposing the nation’s strictest regulations on diesel engines.

The California Air Resources Board ordered a new report after the employee who wrote it was found to have lied about his academic credentials. That decision was made Wednesday after an air board hearing on the rules, which critics want to delay because of concerns over the cost of retrofitting and replacing the polluting engines.

The head of the air board, Mary Nichols, apologized for not telling all board members about the problem with the report’s author, Hien Tran, who claimed he had a doctorate in statistics from UC Davis, when he actually had obtained the degree from an unaccredited distance learning school. Nichols knew about the problem before the board voted on the regulation.

Tran has since been demoted. One air board member asked that the regulations be suspended, but that idea was turned down.

Cooley today said Brown should’ve jumped in.

“This is a person who falsified his credentials and Mary Nichols concealed that from the Air Resources Board … a major bureaucratic failing on her part, not to notify people who had to make policy decisions based on her report,” he said. “Jerry Brown just looked the other way, I’d have been knocking at her door asking questions.”

Brown’s office at first said he was unavailable until 5 p.m. today, so I told them I wait until 6 p.m. before posting this; they then said a few minutes ago that they still couldn’t reach him, so they’d decline to comment.

An e-mail sent to CARB earlier this afternoon wasn’t answered.

Posted on Monday, September 27th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, 2010 governor's race, Attorney General, Jerry Brown, Steve Cooley | 4 Comments »

AG candidates spar over abortion rights

San Francisco District Attorney Kamala Harris, the Democratic nominee for state Attorney General, held a news conference this morning to call upon her Republican opponent – Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley – to clarify his position on abortion rights.

Cooley “has consistently refused” to state his position, Harris’ campaign said in a news release, citing his refusal to answer NARAL Pro-Choice California’s questionnaire.

“NARAL Pro-Choice California is proud to endorse Kamala Harris for Attorney General. She will continue her long record of leadership to protect the right of women and their families to make personal, private decisions,” NARAL director Amy Everitt said in Harris’ news release. “California needs an Attorney General who is not afraid to lead, and who can take the time to return a phone call or fill out a questionnaire about one of the most important and fundamental rights that the A.G. has jurisdiction over. And California needs an A.G. who understands that choice is not a partisan issue. Steve Cooley has been silent on where he stands on a woman’s right to chose despite numerous phone calls, emails and letters.”

Harris’ camp says the state attorney general has statutory duties dealing with abortion rights, including implementation of new regulations surrounding federal health-care reform, enforcement of the California Freedom of Access to Clinic and Church Entrances (FACE) Act, enforcement of California’s laws ensuring timely access to emergency contraception, and more.

Steve CooleyBut Cooley’s campaign says her accusations are a load of balderdash: “The only problem with the latest Harris attack is that Steve Cooley is pro-choice. He’s always been pro-choice. Even worse, Kamala Harris knows it.”

Cooley’s news release says he didn’t answer NARAL’s questionnaire because it’s not a neutral organization “whatever claims they’ll make,” and “could be counted on to attack Cooley regardless of what our campaign did or didn’t say. Today’s presser proves it.”

“The bottom line: the trailing Harris is desperately trying to change the topic from her poor record on public safety and lack of support from law enforcement to something else. Anything else. So she is trying to manufacture phony issues with remarkably lame attacks,” Cooley’s camp claimed.

Posted on Friday, September 24th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, Attorney General, Kamala Harris, Steve Cooley | 5 Comments »

Harris campaign blasts Cooley for campaign cash

The race for state Attorney General got hotter yet today with a report that the Republican nominee, Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley, never noticed that one of his donors was using straw men to bypass campaign contribution limits, even as he prosecuted others for doing the same thing.

Steve CooleyThe LA Weekly reported that Gladwin Gill, a twice-convicted felon who is about to enter federal prison for campaign-finance fraud, had employees and associates donate to Cooley’s re-election campaign in 2003 and 2004 and then reimbursed them – exactly the kind of scheme for which Cooley prosecuted a billionaire real estate developer’s associates in 2003.

“The bottom line is that all the things that Steve Cooley has been shouting from the mountaintops at and persecuting and prosecuting and hounding people on for years, it seems that when the same thing happens under his own roof, nobody notices,” Ace Smith, campaign manager for Democratic Attorney General nominee and San Francisco District Attorney Kamala Harris, said on a conference call with reporters this afternoon. “This (Gill) is a man who had gotten in trouble with the very same DA’s office, this is a man who was involved in a well-publicized case, and it didn’t dawn on anyone? My goodness, this is unbelievable.”

Smith said Cooley should bring in criminal investigators from outside his office to do an independent probe of what Cooley and his staff knew and when they knew it. Cooley also should return all contributions and gifts to Gill and his associates, and release all records of any contacts between Gill, his associates and his business entities and Cooley’s office, Smith said – all to be accomplished “quickly, rapidly and transparently.”

Told Cooley’s office has said the statute of limitations for any possible offenses expired in 2008, Smith fumed that’s “one of the most disgraceful answers I’ve ever heard from a law enforcement person.” For someone who claims to have built a career on corruption-busting to reject an investigation on such grounds is “pathetic,” he said.

“The only thing pathetic is Ace Smith’s hollow outrage and the story they’ve contrived,” responded Cooley campaign spokesman Kevin Spillane, who accused Smith of having planted the story with the LA Weekly in the first place.

Unlike Cooley, Harris has no real record of prosecuting public corruption cases, and so this is a “pathetic, lame attempt by the Harris campaign to distract from her vulnerabilities,” Spillane added, saying law enforcement groups are overwhelmingly endorsing Cooley.

As for repaying the contributions, Smith said, “If he needs to, he should write a personal check. Maybe he should cash in some of those gifts he took.”

“We’re talking about something that was three campaigns ago,” Spillane replied, noting Los Angeles County requires that campaign accounts be closed after the races are run. “The bottom line is that the money has long since been spent.”

Cooley – who as a popular Republican already holding public office in a Democratic stronghold seems to be one of the strongest members of the GOP statewide slate this November – leads Harris slightly in the polls. Harris’ campaign has made much of the San Francisco Chronicle’s report earlier this month that Cooley accepted gifts from prominent Southern Californians; all of the gifts were reported and none exceeded any legal limits.

Posted on Thursday, August 26th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, Attorney General, campaign finance, Kamala Harris, Steve Cooley | 2 Comments »

The candidates’ positions on the Prop. 8 ruling

So the rhetoric was flying hot and heavy yesterday in the wake of U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker’s invalidation of Proposition 8’s ban on same-sex marriage as unconstitutional; statements were coming in at all hours (they still are, actually), and we got most of the salient ones online.

But now that most quarters have been heard from, I thought it might be interesting to juxtapose the statements from the major-party candidates seeking the offices of state attorney general, governor and U.S. Senator. Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley, the Republican nominee for attorney general, was last to send his statement yesterday and we never got it online until now, so let’s start with him:

“Barring a law that is unconstitutional on its face, the proper role of an Attorney General is to enforce and defend the will of the People as manifested through the initiative or legislative process. The will of the People should be respected and not overturned easily or lightly. Today’s decision by a federal judge overturning Proposition 8 should be appealed and tested at a higher level of our legal system. The California Supreme Court upheld Proposition 8 by a 6 to 1 vote and declared it to be constitutional. Likewise, if the voters had approved an initiative legalizing same-sex marriage and a federal judge had ruled against it, I would also support an appeal of that decision.”

From San Francisco District Attorney and Democratic Attorney General nominee Kamala Harris:

“Today’s historic decision in Perry v. Schwarzenegger was a monumental step forward in the fight for equality.

“From the moment Attorney General Jerry Brown issued his analysis that Prop 8 violates the equal protection clause of the United States Constitution, I have proudly concurred with him. That position has been confirmed by Federal Judge Walker’s opinion today and stands in a proud line of jurisprudence reflected so boldly in 1948 when California’s Supreme Court ruled that a ban on interracial marriage violated the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, a conclusion finally reached in 1967 by the United States Supreme Court in Loving v. Virginia.

“Attorney General Brown, Judge Walker, and I have all sworn to defend and uphold the Constitution of the United States. So, if I am given the privilege to serve as California’s next Attorney General, I will not defend the anti-gay Proposition 8 in Federal court. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for my opponent in the California Attorney General’s race, who promises to put the full weight of the state of California behind a defense of this discriminatory amendment.

“I pledge my support as this fight continues to another court and if necessary, the Supreme Court. I will continue to advocate for the defeat of Prop 8, whether we win that battle in the courts or at the ballot box. We may well face a lengthy battle on this issue but, as Dr. King said in 1967, ‘the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice.’”

From Darrel Ng, spokesman for Republican gubernatorial nominee Meg Whitman:

“Meg supported Proposition 8 and believes marriage is between a man and a woman. Meg also strongly supports California’s civil union laws. Today’s ruling is the first step in a process that will continue.”

From California Attorney General and Democratic gubernatorial nominee Jerry Brown:

“In striking down Proposition 8, Judge Walker came to the same conclusion I did when I declined to defend it: Proposition 8 violates the equal protection guarantee of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution by taking away the right of same-sex couples to marry, without a sufficient governmental interest.”

From Republican senatorial nominee Carly Fiorina:

“The people of California spoke clearly on this issue at the ballot box in 2008. That decision is being challenged through our court system and while I don’t agree with the judge’s ruling today, this is one in what will be a multi-step legal process.”

From U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif.:

“This historic decision is a step forward in the march toward equal rights and reflects a growing legal consensus that marriage equality is protected by the U.S. Constitution.”

Posted on Thursday, August 5th, 2010
Under: 2010 election, 2010 governor's race, Barbara Boxer, Carly Fiorina, Jerry Brown, Meg Whitman, same-sex marriage, Steve Cooley, U.S. Senate | No Comments »