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Gavin Newsom raises money with Train tickets

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom is raising money for his 2018 gubernatorial campaign by raffling off tickets to a Grammy-winning band that prides itself on its San Francisco pedigree.

“We’re putting on a small concert with Train on November 3 in San Francisco, and I’m hoping you’ll be able to join me!” Newsom wrote in an email to supporters Wednesday. “When Train played the Bay Area this summer, it was for a crowd of 22,000 – but this will be a small crowd and an intimate venue (not a bad seat in the house!). We’ll get to hang out with the band before the show, and I’ll also introduce you to some of my family and friends – and Jen will be there, too, of course!”

A donation of $5 or more automatically enters the contributor to win two tickets, plus travel and hotel costs for winners coming from out of town.

Formed in San Francisco in 1993, Train has had platinum-album hits including “Meet Virginia” (1998), “Drops of Jupiter” (2001), “Calling All Angels” (2003), and “Hey, Soul Sister” (2009) – the latter from the album “Save Me, San Francisco,” of which the title track is a paean to the city by the bay.

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Dave Jones to run for Attorney General

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones announced Thursday that he’ll run for state attorney general in 2018.

Dave Jones (Oct.2015)That could set up an interesting situation, as Gov. Jerry Brown might well have to appoint someone in 2017 to fill the rest of current Attorney General Kamala Harris’ term if she’s successful in her campaign to succeed U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer next year.

Having a statewide constitutional officer’s hat already in the ring for the office could nudge Brown to appoint a “caretaker” – someone not inclined to seek election in 2018 – to the potential vacancy should Harris go to the Senate.

But plenty of others covet the post, too. Those who’ve filed statements of intention to run for attorney general in 2018 – not a commitment, just a sort of placeholder that lets them keep money in campaign committees – include former state Senate Majority Leader Ellen Corbett, D-Hayward, who has $183,405 banked for the race; former state Sen. Lou Correa; D-Santa Ana, who has $384,982 banked; former Assemblyman Dario Frommer, D-La Canada Flintridge, who has $657,535 banked; Assemblyman Don Wagner, R-Irvine, who has $2,980 banked but other money spread across other committees (including one for a 2016 state Senate run); and San Bernardino County District Attorney Mike Ramos, a Republican who has $74,975 banked.

Jones starts the race with $2.6 million cash on hand in his prior campaign account, which can be used for the Attorney General race, and a base of support throughout the state, according to a news release from campaign consultant Parke Skelton.

Jones, 53, was a Sacramento councilman from 1999 to 2004 and a state assemblyman from 2004 to 2011, when he began the first of his two terms as insurance commissioner.

“I am very excited at the prospect of working to make California’s communities safer,” he wrote in an email to prospective supporters Thursday. “I will hold accountable all who commit crimes, including corporations, corporate leaders, and public officials who violate the public trust. I will continue my work protecting consumers. And I will work hard to help all Californians succeed in an economy that is increasingly characterized by haves and have nots.”

Jones wrote that his Insurance Department already investigates major insurance crimes and protects consumers, his more than 300 law enforcement officers making more than 3,800 arrests since he began his tenure there and working closely with district attorneys across the state. He wrote that he’s starting his campaign so early due to “the reality of the cost of campaigning in California and the amount of Super PAC money likely to be spent against me by special interests.”