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Trump’s first TV ad, from Morocco to Mexico

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has released his first television campaign ad.

Trump has pledged to spend at least $2 million every week as the GOP nominating contest heats up, CNN reports, and the Iowa and New Hampshire television ad buys will cost him slightly in excess of that, according to his campaign.

PolitiFact notes while the narrator describes Trump’s vow to “stop illegal immigration by building a wall on our southern border that Mexico will pay for,” the footage displayed actually depicts migrants in Morocco trying to enter a Spanish enclave (and thus, the European Union).

But Politico’s Eliza Collins tweeted a statement from the Trump campaign saying that this was intentional “and selected to demonstrate the severe impact of an open border and the very real threat Americans face if we do not immediately build a wall and stop illegal immigration. The biased mainstream media doesn’t understand, but Americans who want to protect their jobs and their families do.”

This, of course, doubles down on Trump’s longstanding contentions that some crisis exists in southern border immigration, when in fact more people have been leaving the United States over that border than entering in recent years; and that immigrants pose a special criminal threat to Americans, which statistically speaking, they don’t.

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SD7: See Susan Bonilla’s first television ad

Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla is launching her first television ad in the 7th State Senate District special election.

The clip includes former Rep. George Miller, D-Martinez, saying “Susan Bonilla is an effective legislator bringing people together to get things done.” Contra Costa County District Attoreny Mark Peterson and others then praise her record of balanced budgets, “fixing schools, creating jobs, fighting crime, passing historic pension reform, protecting the Delta and opposing the tunnels.” Miller then returns to say Bonilla “is true to her word and her actions,” hence her support by Democrats, Republicans, businesses, law enforcement and so on.

Bonilla campaign spokesman Patrick McGarrity said the ad started airing today and will keep running through the May 19 election on cable channels in Alameda and Contra Costa counties. The campaign’s TV budget “is in the low six figures,” he said.

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Florida buys ad blitz before Rick Scott’s LA visit

Florida Ports adFlorida Gov. Rick Scott is softening up southern California with an ad blitz in advance of his visit next week to poach California port jobs.

Enterprise Florida, the Sunshine State’s public-private economic development agency, this week rolled out a “Florida is Ready” ad campaign with an April 6 buy in the Journal of Commerce; the ad also will appear in the Los Angeles Times and in the nine-publication Los Angeles News Group (which is owned by the same parent company as the Bay Area News Group).

And on Thursday, Enterprise Florida released a radio ad which will run on Los Angeles stations in advance of Scott’s visit this coming Sunday and Monday. Here’s the script:

“This is breaking news from the state of Florida. Are you a business owner sick of high taxes? Are you facing burdensome regulations that are hindering your ability to compete and succeed globally? California has the nation’s highest personal income tax rate, the highest state sales tax, and one of the highest gas taxes. Florida Gov. Rick Scott is leading a delegation to California to meet with companies to tell them why Florida is the best place to do business. With no state income tax, no capital gains tax, a business tax that continues to drop and a business-friendly attitude, businesses can keep more of the money they make in Florida. If you’re looking to relocate and expand your business, look no further than the Sunshine State. Gov. Scott wants your company to succeed in Florida.”

“We are excited to travel to California next week to tell California companies why they should do business in Florida, including all of the great reasons for California shippers to consider sending their goods through Florida ports,” Scott said in a news release.

“With our low-tax, business friendly climate and our commitment to investing in our transportation infrastructure, Florida is ready to welcome more job creators to our state,” he added. “In comparison, California has some of the highest taxes in the country and is ranked 50th in regulatory freedom. Elected officials in California are not making it easier for businesses to succeed, and I look forward to meeting with California companies next week as we continue to work toward making Florida the global destination for jobs.”

Scott’s rhetoric aside, California led all other states in job creation in the 12 months ending Jan. 31. Texas, from which Gov. Rick Perry also has come to California seeking to poach jobs, and Florida ranked second and third, respectively.

Perhaps Scott is mostly just looking for a vacation from his worries. He took flak recently for banning state agencies from using the phrase “climate change,” and this week backed off his support of Medicaid expansion, an apparent flip from the previous flip he did on that issue two years ago.

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SD7: Union IE group launches pro-Bonilla TV ad

The union-funded PAC that’s opposing Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer in the 7th State Senate District’s special election has launched a television ad on behalf of Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, D-Concord.

Working Families Opposing Glazer for Senate 2015 rolled out a 30-second ad Wednesday highlighting Bonilla’s efforts to expand early childhood education and her support of a bipartisan bill making it easier to fire educators who abuse children. The ad ends with the voiceover: “No wonder classroom teachers, local law enforcement, and Governor Jerry Brown trust Susan Bonilla.”

https://youtu.be/ImIQlwAHcMc

Working Families spokesman Steve Maviglio said the ad began airing Wednesday and will run for at least a week on all three cable systems serving the district; he wouldn’t specify the cost, except to say it’s a “substantial” ad buy.

Records from the Secretary of State’s office show the group has spent at least $821,000 on the race so far. But Glazer has received a lot of independent-expenditure help, too – Southern California businessman Bill Bloomfield has anted up at least $763,000 on Glazer’s behalf, and the California Chamber of Commerce’s JobsPAC has spent at least about $494,000.

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Kashkari pays for 60-second ad during World Series

For Neel Kashkari, the new mantra might be “Go big AND go home.”

The Republican gubernatorial candidate, whom polls and pundits predict will lose to incumbent Gov. Jerry Brown by at least 15 to 20 points in next Tuesday’s election, has bought a 60-second ad during tonight’s World Series Game Six between the San Francisco Giants and the Kansas City Royals.

The ad is the same one Kashkari rolled out a week ago, continuing to berate Brown for choosing to appeal a court decision that gutted the state’s teacher tenure laws:

Sources close to Kashkari’s campaign say Tuesday night’s game, and the ad, are expected to do a “40 share” – which, translated from television ad parlance, means it will be seen by 2.5 million-plus Bay Area households. At upward of $150,000 for that one minute, it’s a huge investment especially given Kashkari’s lackluster fundraising – he’s had to sink $3.1 million of his own money into his campaign this year – but aims to build upon Kashkari’s drumbeat of criticism on the education issue.

His first ad on the matter – depicting a child drowning in a swimming pool (“betrayed” by Brown) until Kashkari rescues him – was meant to grab voters by the lapels and pay attention, and now this big ad buy is the follow-through, the campaign sources say.

Officials at KTVU, the Fox affiliate that’s airing the World Series in the Bay Area, didn’t return calls and emails Tuesday.

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New Padilla TV ad, Peterson radio ad in SoS race

Alex Padilla, the Democratic candidate for secretary of state, launched a 30-second television ad Thursday highlighting his personal background and legislative track record.

Padilla, a state senator from Pacoima, doesn’t mention his Republican rival, Pete Peterson, at all in the ad.

The ad is running on cable channels in the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles media markets, said Rose Kapolczynski, Padilla’s campaign consultant. “We’ll be adding in broadcast a little bit later, and we’ll be on now through the election.”

She wouldn’t say how much the campaign is spending to air the ad, but said it’s not as much as usual.

“If we had all of the statewide races heavily on the air, we’d be paying a premium for every spot,” she said. “But most of the statewide candidates are not heavily advertising, so for a down-ballot race like ours, we’re getting more bang for the buck.”

Peterson hasn’t aired television ads, but has a new one-minute radio ad that urges voters to look beyond party labels, underscores that Peterson sees the job as nonpartisan, and touting his newspaper endorsements.

Campaign finance reports show Padilla had about $410,000 cash on hand but about $4,600 in debt as of Sept. 30, but it seems he has collected at least $342,000 in new contributions since then. Peterson basically was in the red as of Sept. 30 – $52,500 cash on hand but $81,100 in debt – and has raised only about $46,000 in major contributions since.