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Mike Huckabee to speak at state GOP convention

Republican presidential candidate and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee will speak at a lunch banquet during the California Republican Party’s Fall Convention on Sept. 18 in Anaheim.

HuckabeeThe announcement comes one week after the state GOP said Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, also a presidential candidate, will headline the convention’s big Saturday-night dinner on Sept. 19.

“As governor of Arkansas, Mike Huckabee prompted much needed reform and set the bar high for his fellow governors,” state GOP chairman Jim Brulte said in a news release. “A proven leader, I’m very excited he could join us to kick off convention with the first banquet.”

California Republican Party Vice Chairwoman Harmeet Dhillon said Huckabee “has become a strong, but reasonable voice for conservatives across the nation through his time as governor and as a bestselling author and talk show host. With his years of experience, Huckabee is sure to have a great message to share with our fellow Republicans.”

Huckabee, in the same release said he’s “excited to be kicking off the California Republican Party convention and helping build excitement and enthusiasm for the great things California Republicans are going to help us accomplish in 2016.”

Mike Huckabee was the 44th governor of Arkansas, serving from 1996 to 2007. He won the 2008 Iowa caucus, but eventually finished third for the GOP nomination behind John McCain and Mitt Romney; since then, he has made a name as an author, radio commentator and host, and at the helm of his own Fox News Channel show.

Huckabee now polls fifth and Walker polls second for the Republican nomination, according to an average of recent national polls compiled by Real Clear Politics.

6

Ron Nehring to chair Ted Cruz’s CA campaign

Former California Republican Party Chairman Ron Nehring will serve as chairman of 2016 GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz’s campaign in the Golden State.

Ron NehringNehring, 44, of El Cajon, unsuccessfully ran for lieutenant governor last year against incumbent Democrat Gavin Newsom. He was the state GOP’s chairman from 2007 to 2011, leading a robust fundraising program to pull the party out of debt; he also chaired the Republican National Committee’s State Chairmen’s committee during those years. Earlier, he chaired the Republican Party of San Diego from 2001 to 2007.

Cruz “is an exciting, Reaganite candidate for president who has demonstrated the courage needed to get the country on track,” Nehring said Monday morning, noting California’s relatively high poverty and unemployment rates “and a middle class squeezed between sky high taxes and a high cost of living.”

“To help Californians regain lost ground, we need a President who will set a new course for the nation that will re-ignite our economy by expanding economic freedoms and opportunity. Ted Cruz has proven he has the courage, skill, principles and experience to make it happen and I’m proud to join his team,” he said. “Our job in California is clear: to build the volunteer army and donor support to win the California primary in June when we’ll elect the largest delegation to the national convention in Cleveland and prepare the battlefield for the general election.”

Cruz, the junior U.S. Senator from Texas, also Monday named former Michigan GOP Chairman Saul Anuzis to chair his campaign in that state. Cruz, 44, in late March became the first major Republican to declare candidacy for 2016’s presidential race – since then, he has been joined by U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.; U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.; retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson; former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina; and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.

“I am excited to add two incredibly experienced, courageous conservatives to our team,” Cruz said in a news release. “Saul has a strong record of leadership, success, and exemplary management in Michigan. Ron has had the courage to believe the GOP can win in California and has a record to prove it in San Diego. With their guidance, our campaign is going to perform exceptionally well in both Michigan and California.”

4

SD7: Money & endorsements as endgame nears

Independent spending has continued to run amok in the all-Democrat 7th State Senate District special election since I last updated the tsunami Friday.

To recap, unions are spending big for Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, D-Concord, and against Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer – though Glazer has his own deep-pocketed, anti-union benefactors. Former Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan looks to be caught in the crossfire, and former Concord City Council candidate Terry Kremin remains beneath the radar.

Mailers are flooding the district’s mailboxes, often several a day, as the candidates plan get-out-the-vote efforts like precinct-walking and phone-banking for the campaign’s final days.

Here’s where the independent spending stands as of Wednesday:

    Bill Bloomfield, businessman: $552,984 (pro-Glazer)
    JobsPAC (California Chamber of Commerce): $297,494 (pro-Glazer or anti- the other two)
    California Charter Schools Association Advocates: $128,202 (pro-Glazer)
    EdVoice: $23,570 (pro-Glazer)
    Independent Voter PAC: $7,539 (pro-Glazer)
    California Dental Association: $336,631 (pro-Bonilla)
    California Professional Firefighters: $154,928 (pro-Bonilla)
    California Medical Association: $83,439 (pro-Bonilla)
    California Building Industry Association: $66,526 (pro-Buchanan)
    Working Families Opposing Glazer (labor unions): $240,829 (anti-Glazer)
    Asian American Small Business PAC: $122,478 (anti-Glazer or pro-Michaela Hertle, a Republican who dropped out and endorsed Glazer)

The grand total: $2,014,619. And that, of course, doesn’t include the $669,000 the three candidates had spent as of Feb. 28 – a figure that will surely rise in these final weeks before next Tuesday’s special primary.

Buchanan’s campaign bankroll includes $75,000 that she loaned out of her own pocket on Feb. 28 – about 26 percent of what her campaign has collected this year.

There’s been no movement yet on the federal trademark-infringement lawsuit that the California Republican Party filed last week against the Asian American Small Business PAC. As previously reported here, the PAC – which almost always supports Asian American Democrats – has been using union money to buy fliers on behalf of Michaela Hertle, the Pleasanton Republican who quit the race Feb. 2 and endorsed Glazer. Hertle and the state GOP contend unions are funneling money through the PAC to produce mailers urging Republicans to vote for Hertle, thereby sapping votes from Glazer.

The party complains the PAC used its elephant logo without permission; party vice chairwoman and attorney Harmeet Dhillon said Wednesday she has not yet been able to serve the committee with the complaint, but she’s sending its officers and vendors letters warning them to preserve evidence for the case.

In other news, Bonilla has continued to rack up significant endorsements in the past few weeks, including those of the California Labor Federation and former Rep. George Miller, D-Martinez. Miller called her “a proven leader who has delivered balanced budgets, improved our schools, fought to protect the Delta, and created new opportunities for middle-class families.”

Clean Water Action endorsed Buchanan last week.

1

California to host GOP presidential primary debate

The Republican National Committee announced Friday that one of the nine GOP presidential primary debates it’s sanctioning will be held somewhere in California in September.

It remains to be seen whether the California debate will be held in a GOP-friendly area like San Diego or Orange County, or if it’ll be in the belly of the liberal beast – like the dreaded San Francisco Bay Area.

head to head“The 2016 cycle is underway, and I can tell you it will be a landmark election for Republicans,” RNC chairman Reince Priebus said in a news release, issued as the national GOP holds its Winter meeting in San Diego. “By constructing and instituting a sound debate process, it will allow candidates to bring their ideas and vision to Americans in a timely and efficient way. This schedule ensures we will have a robust discussion among our candidates while also allowing the candidates to focus their time engaging with Republican voters.”

The debates are scheduled for:

  • August 2015 in Ohio, hosted by Fox News
  • September 2015 in California, hosted by CNN
  • October 2015 in Colorado, hosted by CNBC
  • November 2015 in Wisconsin, hosted by Fox Business
  • December 2015 in Nevada, hosted by CNN
  • January 2016 in Iowa, hosted by Fox News
  • February 2016 in New Hampshire, hosted by ABC News
  • February 2016 in South Carolina, hosted by CBS News
  • February 2016 in Florida, hosted by NBC/Telemundo
  • California Republican Party Chairman Jim Brulte said the fact that the Golden State – which won’t hold its presidential primary until June 7 – will host a debate “is a testament to the role California will play in the upcoming 2016 election. We are excited to be part of the streamlined debate schedule and look forward to hosting a robust group of candidates that will share their vision and passion to help move America forward beyond the failed policies of President Obama.”

    The RNC said it and the broadcast partners soon will announce conservative media partners and panelists. Other possible debates still pending are a Fox News forum in March, a CNN forum in 2016 and a conservative media event at some point along the way.

    6

    Senate 2016: A tale of three GOP chairmen

    Two former California Republican Party chairmen, both from the Bay Area, say they’re seriously considering running to succeed U.S. Sen. Barbrara Boxer in 2016 while a third ex-chairman won’t rule it out.

    But having been the state GOP’s chief executive might not be the best resume fodder for this or any statewide race.

    Tom Del BeccaroTom Del Beccaro, 53, of Lafayette, who chaired the party from 2011 to 2013, was first out of the gate – he had a publicist issue a news release last Thursday, within hours of Boxer’s announcement that she wouldn’t run.

    “My first love has been national politics and foreign affairs for decades,” he said during an interview Monday.

    “Seats like this don’t come open very often. I want to be part of the debate and I want to make sure our side has a positive image and positive things to say.”

    Duf SundheimGeorge “Duf” Sundheim, 62, of Los Altos Hills, who chaired the party from 2003 to 2007, also has floated a trial balloon.

    Sundheim said Monday he’s moved by the plight of students in failing schools, and of small businesses lacking access to capital. It’s not a matter of whether we should be in the political left lane or the right lane, he said: “We’re on the wrong road.”

    Framing a race like this as Republican versus Democrat or conservative versus liberal won’t work well for the Republican conservatives, he added, but voters would much rather hear about the future versus the status quo. If a candidate can do that, he said, “I think you have a real shot.”

    Ron NehringAnd Ron Nehring, 44, of El Cajon, who chaired the party from 2007 to 2011, said Monday he’s “very flattered that people have been talking about me as a potential candidate for the office. … Let’s just leave it at that.” Nehring is the only one of the three who has even sought elected office before: He ran for lieutenant governor last year, finishing 14 percentage points behind incumbent Democrat Gavin Newsom.

    Should they run, they could find that having chaired their state party is more liability than asset. Already each has critics within the party who are burning up various social media with reasons they shouldn’t run.

    “A necessary (but not sufficient) ingredient for a successful California senate run is the ability to raise tens of millions of dollars for your campaign, and another is significant name recognition,” one state GOP insider said Monday on condition of anonymity. “An ideal candidate would also have been elected to office before, preferable statewide or in a major city.”

    “Neither of these two candidates (Sundheim and Del Beccaro) has these necessary qualifications,” the party insider said.

    Lots more, after the jump…
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