Part of the Bay Area News Group

CA17: Updated 2Q totals, and the ethics probe

Rep. Mike Honda’s campaign cash situation isn’t quite as dire as I first reported, although it still isn’t looking great.

A report filed this week with the Federal Election Commission shows Honda, D-San Jose, raised about $368,000 in the year’s second quarter while spending about $213,000, leaving him with about $360,000 cash on hand as of June 30 – or, less about $34,600 in debt, about $325,000 cash on hand.

But that’s somewhat better than the $265,000 cash on hand that his campaign estimated when I asked them earlier this month. Compared to the $1 million that Democratic challenger Ro Khanna had in the bank as of June 30, it’s a three-to-one margin rather than the four-to-one margin it had seemed.

Honda’s campaign told me a key member of its finance team was in labor at the time that I sought the figures earlier this month, so their estimates were a bit off. (Here’s hoping everything went well…)

Khanna’s report shows he still has much of the Silicon Valley elite on his side, with contribution from prominent venture capitalists like John Doerr, Bill Draper and Steve Krausz as well as executives like Integrated Archive Systems’ Amy Rao, Nexenta’s Tarkan Maner and a smattering of names from Salesforce and Google.

But Honda’s contributions include money from the corporate PACs of Intel, Oracle, Applied Materials, Yahoo!, Hewlett-Packard, Cisco Systems and Microsoft, so it’s not as if he’s being shunned by the tech world.

Honda remains the pick of the Democratic establishment. He had contributions this past quarter from the campaign committees or PACs of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, and Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., as well as Reps. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo; Zoe Lofgren, D-San Jose; Judy Chu, D-Monterey Park; John Larson, D-Conn.; Joaquin Castro, D-Texas; and Joe Crowley, D-N.Y.

In other CA17 news, San Jose Inside’s Josh Koehn reported this week that the Office of Congressional Ethics has been investigating the complaint Khanna supporters made last fall about allegedly improper coordination between Honda’s campaign and his official staff.

Koehn’s story links to a transcript of OCE’s interview with Ruchit Agrawal, a former Honda staffer and whistleblower. Agrawal was arrested in December 2013 after allegedly threatening violence against Honda staffers, but he was never charged and he has denied making any such threats.

Honda’s chief of staff apologized in October for her “oversight” in coordinating with Honda’s campaign, though she insisted she didn’t use official resources or time to do so. It’s not surprising that OCE is following up on the complaint, and it’ll be interesting to see what the office’s conclusion turns out to be.

Posted on Friday, July 17th, 2015
Under: Mike Honda, U.S. House | 5 Comments »

Bush, Carson & Fiorina are Bay Area-bound

As the Republican presidential field keeps on expanding, the Bay Area continues to attract candidates in search of campaign cash.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush will hit Los Angeles on Tuesday and Pasadena and Santa Barbara on Wednesday before arriving in the Bay Area.

In San Francisco, he’ll attend a reception Wednesday evening at the home of Cavalry Asset Management founder John Hurley and his wife, Kamilla. Tickets cost $2,700, but co-hosts can pay $10,000 to gain access to a separate photo reception while co-chairs can pay $27,000 for both events plus two tickets to a private VIP event with Bush in Los Angeles on Aug. 11.

And in Silicon Valley, Bush will attend a luncheon reception at midday Thursday in the Village Pub in Woodside; tickets for this cost the same as for the San Francisco event.

Politico’s Playbook says Bush’s Bay Area visit also will include hailing a ride with Uber in order to underscore the importance of innovation and disruptive technology to create jobs, as well as a tour of San Francisco-based Thumbtack, a startup that helps users connect with local professionals from disc jockeys to house painters.

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson is scheduled to have a late-afternoon fundraiser next Thursday, July 23 at an undisclosed home in Alameda County, hosted by the Frederick Douglass Foundation of California. Tickets cost $250 per person.

And Carly Fiorina – no stranger to the Bay Area, as a former Los Altos Hills resident and former Hewlett-Packard CEO – will attend a fundraising reception on Monday, Aug. 10 at the Piedmont home of real estate brokerage founder Bill Cumbelich and his wife, Sara. Tickets start at $250; $1,000 buys entry into a private reception with a photo opportunity; and $2,700 admits the contributor to a host-committee roundtable.

Posted on Monday, July 13th, 2015
Under: 2016 presidential election, campaign finance | 1 Comment »

Rep. Eric Swalwell is having a good week

It’s a banner week for the East Bay’s Rep. Eric Swalwell.

On Tuesday, the life sciences and pharmaceutical industry held a fundraising reception for Swalwell, D-Dublin, at Washington, D.C.’s Sonoma Restaurant and Wine Bar; contributors gave $500, $1,000 or $2,000 each.

On Wednesday, it became apparent that he barely needed Tuesday’s fundraiser. The first-quarter campaign finance report he filed with the Federal Election Commission showed he raised $330,136 from Jan. 1 through March 30, bringing his cash on hand to $534,161.

Mind you, that’s what he has left after giving $50,000 to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and smaller contributions (usually $500 each) to a bunch of California Democrats in tougher districts, including Ami Bera, Julia Brownley, Pete Aguilar and Scott Peters – the kind of party tithing that helps members of Congress build clout for leadership positions.

And speaking of leadership positions, Swalwell – already a regional Democratic whip – on Thursday announced he’ll chair a new “Future Forum” of 14 young Democratic House members focused on issues and opportunities for millennials.

Eric SwalwellAt a kickoff announcement in Washington, Swalwell and Democratic Policy and Communications Committee Chairman Steve Israel, D-N.Y., said forum members are starting a national listening tour with stops in New York, Boston and the Bay Area, with other cities to follow in coming months.

In the Bay Area, those events will include a town hall on rising student debt and college affordability from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. next Monday, April 20 in the event center at Chabot College, 25555 Hesperian Blvd. in Hayward. Swalwell and several other forum members also will hold a town hall on millennial entrepreneurship from 6 to 7 p.m. that night at the Impact Hub SF co-working space, 925 Mission St. in San Francisco.

“The issues of rising student loan debt, college affordability and declining millennial entrepreneurship do not just impact young Americans, they affect the health of our overall economy. Congress can’t afford to ignore these pressing challenges,” Swalwell said in a news release. “But we can’t just be talking about millennials; we need to be listening to millennials. To that end, we are crowdsourcing stories and ideas at events around the country and via social media and Medium to hear directly from our generation about how Congress can take action to better our future.”

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, said in the release that the forum members “bring the energetic, innovative, forward-looking leadership needed to meet the 21st century challenges we face. This effort is about bringing young people to the table and harnessing their dynamism, optimism, and hope to create a future where equality of opportunity exists for all, not just the ultra-wealthy and well-connected.”

Other Future Forum include Aguilar, D-Redlands; Brendan Boyle, D-Pa.; Joaquin Castro, D-Texas; Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii; Ruben Gallego, D-Ariz.; Joe Kennedy, D-Mass.; Derek Kilmer, D-Wash.; Ted Lieu, D-Torrance; Grace Meng, D-N.Y.; Seth Moulton, D-Mass.; Patrick Murphy, D-Fla.; Jared Polis, D-Colo.; and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz.

All this unfolds while there’s not yet anyone clearly preparing to challenge Swalwell in 2016.

At this time two years ago, then-state Senate Majority Leader Ellen Corbett already had announced she would take him on. But her third-place finish in last June’s top-two primary has called into question whether a challenge on Swalwell’s left flank can be effective in a district where 22.7 percent of voters are nonpartisan and 21.5 percent are Republicans.

Now, without a potential rival breathing down his neck, watch for him to spend more of his second term focused not only on serving constituents but also on shoring up his bona fides within the party to assure himself a more prominent future.

Posted on Thursday, April 16th, 2015
Under: Eric Swalwell, U.S. House | 3 Comments »

‘Draft Condi’ petition starts, but is it a ‘scam PAC?’

A conservative PAC is gathering petition signatures online to draft former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice into California’s 2016 U.S. Senate race.

Rice, who a recent Field Poll found ranked highest among those for whom Californians would be inclined to vote, has said she’s not interested in running. The only well-known declared candidate so far is state Attorney General Kamala Harris, a Democrat; two little-known Republicans, John Estrada of Fresno and Mark Hardie of Whittier, are running too though Hardie has yet to form a campaign committee.

The Conservative Action Fund, based in Virginia, has established a webpage to gather petition signatures calling for Rice to enter the race. Chairman Shaun McCutcheon then sent out an email urging supporters to sign it “and then make a generous contribution of $25, $50 or even $100 to the Conservative Action Fund, so that we can convince Condi to enter the race and ensure we’re ready to maximize her impact and help propel her to victory!”

The email offers more red meat for conservative voters.

“Friend, you know the Obama Democrats consider California their own private political preserve — the soon-to-be-vacated Senate seat permanently held for the next Big Government, nanny state liberal in line,” it reads. “The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and a host of left-wing special interests will pump tens of millions into holding the seat — by demonizing any Republican who dares to run.”

“That holds especially true for a tough, accomplished African American woman like Condi Rice — it’s their worst nightmare!” the email continues. “That’s why we need your help to encourage her to enter the race and ensure she has the support she needs to run a successful campaign!”

But whether or not there’s a genuine grassroots groundswell for Rice, potential donors might want to beware.

The Conservative Action Fund seems to be the poster child for what some are calling “scam PACs” that spend a lot more money on their own fundraising, salaries and other administrative costs than they give to or spend on behalf of candidates. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, this fund spent about 73 percent of its money in the 2014 cycle on fundraising and administrative costs.

UPDATE @ 10:32 A.M. WEDNESDAY: Apparently the Black Conservatives Fund – a somewhat more reputable PAC that spends more supporting candidates than on itself – also is launching a drive to draft Rice.

Posted on Monday, February 23rd, 2015
Under: U.S. Senate | 4 Comments »

SD7: The money and endorsements update

Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla has more money banked for the 7th State Senate District special election than any of her competitors, according to campaign finance reports filed this week.

Susan BonillaBonilla, D-Concord, reported $239,317.45 cash on hand with $1,323.41 in debts yet to be paid
as of Jan. 31; most of her money was transferred over either from her 2014 Assembly campaign committee, or from the committee she’d launched to seek this seat in 2016 (before this special election was called). Among the bigger new contributors to this latest campaign are the Peace Officers Research Association of California PAC ($8,500); New Jersey-based NRG Energy Inc. ($4,200); Florida-based Southern Wine and Spirits of America Inc. ($4,200); and Assemblymen Jim Frazier, D-Oakley, Jim Wood, D-Healdsburg, and Bill Dodd, D-Napa ($4,200 each).

Since filing that report, Bonilla on Tuesday collected $4,200 from the California Society of Anesthesiologists’ PAC and $4,200 from the California Ambulatory Surgery Association PAC.

Former Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan, D-Alamo, had $147,548.35 cash on hand but $45,110.45 in debts yet to be paid as of Jan. 31; most of her money was transferred over from her 2012 Assembly campaign committee. But since filing that report, Buchanan received $8,200 on Monday from the California Teachers Association’s Association for Better Citizenship political fund.

Michelle Henry, Buchanan’s campaign manager, said Buchanan’s campaign kickoff on Thursday night was well-attended, the money is flowing in, and the polling looks good.

“We are confident that we will have the resources to successfully communicate with voters about our positive campaign through Election Day,” Henry said. “We will not be responding to other campaigns’ self-serving comparisons, and Joan has said repeatedly that she is running a positive-only campaign”

Steve GlazerOrinda Mayor Steve Glazer, also a Democrat, reported $20,863.96 cash on hand with no debts as of Jan. 31. That includes $10,000 over from his 2014 Assembly campaign committee. The single biggest new contribution he received was $4,200 from Californians for Jobs and a Strong Economy, a political action supporting centrist Democrats; the PAC’s biggest donors in 2014 were Chevron, PG&E, the California Credit Union League, and AT&T.

UPDATE @ 1:13 P.M. MONDAY: Apparently Californians for Jobs and a Strong Economy is hedging its bets – it also gave $4,200 to Bonilla and $4,200 to Buchanan.

Since filing the report, Glazer this week collected $8,400 from David and Carla Crane of San Francisco; David Crane – formerly an economic adviser to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and a UC regent – is cofounder of Govern for California, a group that supports “courageous state legislators who put the interests of their fellow citizens ahead of personal, party or special interests.” Other big contributions to Glazer this week included $4,200 from Silicon Valley entrepreneur Thomas Layton of Palo Alto and $4,200 from Maryett Thompson of Orinda.

Glazer noted Friday that he entered the race later, and so had less time to raise funds, than Bonilla or Buchanan.

“I am surprised that Bonilla thinks that all of this fundraising from Sacramento special interests is worth touting,” he added. “I urge her to release her answers to the secret questionnaires that many of these groups require before they will contribute. I would also encourage her to back my plan to ban all fundraising during the final 60 days of each legislative session.”

Democrat Terry Kremin, a two-time Concord City Council candidate, reported no fundraising.

The special primary will be held March 17; if nobody gets more than 50 percent of the primary vote, the special general election will be held May 19.

Follow after the jump for a rundown of the endorsements made in this race in the past week…
Read the rest of this entry »

Posted on Friday, February 6th, 2015
Under: California State Senate, Joan Buchanan, Susan Bonilla | 5 Comments »

A third U.S. Senator supports Kamala Harris

A third U.S. Senator has lent her support to California Attorney General Kamala Harris’ bid to succeed Barbara Boxer in 2016.

U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., sent an email to supporters Friday morning saying that if they don’t know Harris yet, they will soon.

“Kamala’s awesome record speaks for itself: She’s been a fierce advocate for women and children, common sense gun safety reform, and equal opportunity for all Americans,” Gillibrand wrote. “She’s exactly the kind of leader we need in the Senate – but she’ll have to fight every single day to get there.”

The email included a fundraising plea, with a goal of $35,000 by midnight Friday to “get Kamala off to the strong start she needs,” Gillibrand added. “Kamala has had a slew of firsts: the first woman, first African American, and first South Asian to be elected as California’s attorney general. I have no doubt she’s up to the challenge ahead. I am truly thrilled Kamala’s in this race – and I hope you’ll join me in supporting her today.”

Gillibrand’s email follows support from U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who tweeted out a fundraising plea:

…and from U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., who did the same:

Harris also Friday rolled out an endorsement from California Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, D-San Diego. “From her relentless advocacy for California homeowners, to her innovative crime fighting strategies as California’s top cop, Kamala is exactly what California needs to carry on the strong legacy and powerful example set by Barbara Boxer,” Atkins said.

Boxer announced last Thursday that her current, fourth six-year term will be her last. Harris, 50, who was just sworn into her second term as California’s “top cop,” declared her candidacy Tuesday.

Hedge fund billionaire and environmental activist Tom Steyer, 57, a Democrat from San Francisco, seems likelier than not to enter the race. Others who’ve said they’re considering the race include Democratic former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa; Rep. Loretta Sanchez, D-Garden Grove; Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Dublin; and former California Republican Party chairmen Tom Del Beccaro of Lafayette and Duf Sundheim of Los Gatos Hills.

UPDATE @ 2:07 P.M.: Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, is about to email out her own fundraising plea on Harris’ behalf.

“I am proud to tell you that I enthusiastically endorse her candidacy, and will do everything in my power to help her cross the finish line,” Lee wrote in the email, citing Harris’ progressive credentials including her championing a Homeowners’ Bill of Rights; protecting consumers from identify theft and predatory lending; and as district attorney, creating special units to tackle hate crimes and environmental protection. “Kamala is exactly the kind of tough progressive we need fighting for California in Washington.”

Posted on Friday, January 16th, 2015
Under: Barbara Boxer, Kamala Harris, U.S. Senate | 9 Comments »

Will the rich buy California’s 2016 Senate race?

Campaign finance reform is needed to keep California’s 2016 U.S. Senate race from being bought by a small number of deep-pocketed donors, a consumer advocacy group said Wednesday.

The California Public Interest Research Group (CALPIRG) is pushing for a federal program that would match small contributions with limited public funds, so that grassroots candidates relying on small donors can compete with big-money candidates.

“California is no exception to the rule of big donor domination of politics,” CALPIRG campaign organizer Zach Weinstein said in a news release. “Any candidate who wants to run a viable campaign for Senate in 2016 will need to raise millions and millions of dollars to do so, and our current system makes that level of fundraising nearly impossible if you rely on small donors. Unless you’re connected to a network of big donors, you’re out of the running before you even start. The reforms we’re proposing could fundamentally change that system.”

U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., announced last week that she won’t seek a fifth six-year term in 2016. California Attorney General Kamala Harris declared her candidacy Tuesday, and although Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom has opted out, several other well-known names are considering whether to run.

Candidates in California’s last four Senate elections raised an average of $8.76 million, according to a memo issued Wednesday by CALPIRG; the highest amount, $23.17 million, was raised by Boxer for her 2010 re-election battle against Republican Carly Fiorina, who raised $11.63 million.

Current rules say individual donors can give up to $2,600 to a candidate for a primary election and another $2,600 for the general election for a total of $5,200 per campaign cycle; the Federal Election Commission will to revise this limit upward in the next few weeks after receiving new Consumer Price Index figures from the Labor Department.

But based on the current limit, a Senate candidate would have to raise more than $13,000 from individuals every day from now until Election Day in order to hit the average $8.76 million mark, CALPIRG notes. For a candidate relying on donors who “max out,” that’s five donors per day; for a candidate relying on small donors giving an average of $150, that’s 88 donors per day.

“When campaigns are paid for by big donors, those are the voices candidates hear the loudest,” Weinstein said. “In a democracy based on the principle of one person, one vote, small donors should be at the center of campaign finance – not an afterthought.”

Posted on Wednesday, January 14th, 2015
Under: Barbara Boxer, campaign finance, U.S. Senate | 3 Comments »

The Bay Area House races you haven’t heard about

I feel as if I’ve written a million stories and blog items about the hotly contested 17th Congressional District race between Rep. Mike Honda and challenger Ro Khanna, and I did a story last week about the lopsided race for the Bay Area’s only open House seat, in the 11th District.

Sadly, these and many other election duties precluded me from getting into the Bay Area’s other House races. It’s safe to say none of the Democratic incumbents are endangered, but I wish for the days when we had enough staff and time to cover them all individually.

For now, a summary will have to suffice – a brief look at the candidates, the challenger’s stances on a few issues, fundraising and voter education in those districts.

Dale Mensing2nd District: Rep. Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael, is challenged in his bid for a second term by Republican Dale Mensing, a supermarket cashier from Redway. Mensing calls for securing the nation’s borders; reforming Social Security to include personal retirement accounts; and replacing Obamacare with a system including personal medical accounts. Huffman reported raising $884,000, Mensing reported raising $5,400. The district is registered 49.1 percent Democrat, 21.3 percent Republican and 23 percent independent.

James Hinton5th District: Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Napa, is challenged in his bid for a ninth term by independent James Hinton of Napa. Hinton calls for a “Next New Deal” including a 1 percent Wall Street sales tax and re-regulation of financial markets; ending free trade with a protective tariff, parity price floors and other protections for U.S. producers; Medicare for all; and expanding Social Security. Thompson reported raising $1.73 million, Hinton reported no fundraising. The district is registered 51.2 percent Democrat, 21.1 percent Republican and 20.8 percent independent.

Tony Amador9th District: Rep. Jerry McNerney, D-Stockton, is challenged in his bid for a fifth term by Republican Tony Amador, a retired U.S. Marshal from Lodi. Amador calls for cutting taxes to create jobs, improving education, fixing Obamacare, and taking better care of veterans. McNerney reported raising $1.16 million, Amador reported raising $61,300. The district is registered 45.1 percent Democrat, 32.5 percent Republican and 18.3 percent independent.

John Dennis12th District: House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, is challenged in her bid for a 15th term by Republican John Dennis, a San Francisco businessman. Dennis calls for auditing the Federal Reserve, bringing U.S. troops home from overseas, ensuring civil liberties and abolishing corporate, capital gains and income taxes. Pelosi reported raising $2.4 million, Dennis reported raising $580,000. The district is registered 56.1 percent Democrat, 8.1 percent Republican and 30.9 percent independent.

Dakin Sundeen13th District: Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, is challenged in her bid for an eighth full term by Republican Dakin Sundeen, an information technology system administrator from Oakland. Sundeen calls for forcing local schools to compete for students, cracking down on surveillance abuses in the name of national security, reforming drug-sentencing laws, reforming and flattening the tax code, and repealing Obamacare. Lee reported raising $1.05 million, Sundeen reported raising $4,900. The district is registered 63.1 percent Democrat, 7.3 percent Republican and 19 percent independent.

Robin Chew14th District: Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, is challenged in her bid for a third full term by Republican Robin Chew of Redwood City, cofounder of an online education marketing company. Chew calls for infrastructure renewal, using technology to reinvent education, controlling federal spending, and new environmental policies to better address climate change. Speier reported raising $1.02 million, Chew reported raising $25,000. The district is registered 51.8 percent Democrat, 16.7 percent Republican and 27.6 percent independent.

Hugh Bussell15th District: Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Dublin, is challenged in his bid for a second term by Republican Hugh Bussell, a technology manager from Livermore. Bussell calls for reducing high taxes and heavy regulation, replacing Obamacare with other reforms, and securing the nation’s borders. Swalwell reported raising $1.93 million, Bussell reported raising $19,800. The district is registered 47.8 percent Democrat, 21.5 percent Republican and 21.9 percent independent.

Richard Fox18th District: Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, is challenged in her bid for a 12th term by Republican Richard Fox, a pediatrician and attorney from Los Gatos. Fox describes himself as “a Libertarian-Republican focused on smaller government as the best way to foster more jobs, better and more affordable healthcare, better schools, and privacy protection.” Eshoo reported raising $1.4 million, Fox reported raising $39,600. The district is registered 45.2 percent Democrat, 23.6 percent Republican and 27.3 percent independent.

Robert Murray19th District: Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-San Jose, is challenged in her bid for an 11th term by fellow Democrat Robert Murray, a Morgan Hill business executive. Murray calls for repealing Obamacare, cutting spending, improving public education, and cutting corporate and capital gains taxes. Lofgren reported raising $1.04 million, Murray reported no fundraising. The district is registered 46 percent Democrat, 22.3 percent Republican and 27.9 percent independent.

Ronald Kabat20th District: Rep. Sam Farr, D-Santa Cruz, is challenged in his bid for a 12th term by independent Ronald Paul Kabat, a Carmel accountant. Kabat’s calls for pruning the federal government’s size, reforming the tax code, reducing the national debt and creating jobs. Farr reported raising $673,000, Kabat reported raising $15,000. The district is registered 52.2 percent Democrat, 21 percent Republican and 22.1 percent independent.

Posted on Thursday, October 30th, 2014
Under: 2014 general, Anna Eshoo, Barbara Lee, Eric Swalwell, Jackie Speier, Jared Huffman, Jerry McNerney, Mike Thompson, Nancy Pelosi, Sam Farr, U.S. House | 3 Comments »

CA17: PCCC aids Honda, Newsom aids Khanna

It was a battle of the proxies Friday in the 17th Congressional District as a national liberal grassroots group came to Rep. Mike Honda’s aid while Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom made a plea on Democratic challenger Ro Khanna’s behalf.

Both say the race is basically tied, and that their chosen candidate needs a little added oomph to seal the deal.

PCCCThe Progressive Change Campaign Committee and liberal firebrand Rep. Alan Grayson, D-Fla., sent an email to PCCC members – about a million nationwide, including about 125,000 in California – urging them to donate money to or make phone calls for Honda’s campaign. PCCC also is adding Honda to its “Call Out The Vote” program, mobilizing calls to voters from its national election headquarters and volunteers across the country on his behalf.

“Mike Honda is one of my closest allies in the House — a solid progressive champion,” Grayson writes in the email. “But today he’s in a tight race against a challenger lavishly funded by corporate big shots. The latest poll in his California district shows Honda up two points – and in this progressive district, that’s only due to corporate money.”

The email lauds Honda’s record before claiming “a bunch of corporate CEOs have decided they’d rather have a tool of their own in that seat, so they’re backing Mike’s opponent – a guy who has refused to commit to protecting Social Security benefits, let alone expanding them.”

As I’ve previously reported, Khanna has balked at expanding Social Security benefits but has repeatedly vowed to protect existing benefits for “current and future seniors.”

PCCC spokeswoman Laura Friedenbach said Friday that helping Honda win is a no-brainer for her group, especially since Khanna sent out a mailer blasting Honda as being too liberal.

“Khanna can’t seem to decide what party he sides with, but he’s made one thing clear: He’s not on the side of progressives,” she said. “This race is center stage in a national battle taking place between corporate Democrats and Elizabeth Warren wing Democrats for the soul of the Democratic Party.”

The plea for help on Honda’s behalf comes as Honda appears to have the upper hand in cash to spend from now until Election Day. But Khanna spokesman Tyler Law said it’s a sign of desperation.

“Yesterday the Honda campaign sent out a desperate email saying they might have to close down a field office,” Law said. “Today they’re begging for out-of-state-support because they don’t have enough local volunteers. Actions speak louder than words, and their actions are making it pretty clear they are worried.”

Newsom, in an email blast sent out by Khanna’s campaign, urged voters to sign up to volunteer in the campaign’s final weeks.

Gavin Newsom“Silicon Valley leads the world in innovation, and it deserves a representative who works as hard and is as entrepreneurial as the people in this district,” Newsom wrote. “That’s what Ro brings to the table.

“We need someone who will fight to make sure local businesses can grow, help create good paying jobs, and make sure the economy works for everyone, not just those at the top,” he added. “Ro has concrete plans to get it done. And throughout this campaign, he’s shown that he will listen to the people in this district and fight for what matters to you.”

Honda spokesman Vivek Kembaiyan replied that Honda “is proud to fight for progressive values like raising the minimum wage and expanding Social Security, and grateful to have the backing of grassroots allies like the PCCC and it’s thousands of members. This is a stark contrast to Ro Khanna, who is relying on the millionaires, billionaires, and companies that fund his Super PAC to call the shots.”

Posted on Friday, October 24th, 2014
Under: 2014 general, Mike Honda, U.S. House | 2 Comments »

CA17: FEC reports show Ro Khanna running low

Rep. Mike Honda still had almost $1 million banked for his re-election campaign at the end of September, while Democratic challenger Ro Khanna was almost out of money, new Federal Election Commission reports show.

Honda, D-San Jose, reported raising $412,167.16 and spending $450,861.74 in this year’s third quarter, and had $964,638.14 cash on hand as of Sept. 30 with no outstanding debt.

Khanna, a former Obama administration official from Fremont, reported raising $323,291.72 and spending $972,139.27; he had $218,106.35 cash on hand as of Sept. 30, but with $140,980.31 in outstanding debt.

This is a tremendous turnaround from the campaign’s early days. Khanna had entered this race with a huge bankroll because he’d raised a record-setting $1.2 million in the final quarter of 2011, when people thought he would run to succeed Rep. Pete Stark in the 15th District. When Stark didn’t retire, Khanna pivoted instead to this 17th District race, and outraised Honda for the rest of 2013.

But Honda has outraised Khanna in the first three quarters of 2014, while Khanna spent most of his campaign’s fortune before the primary – in which he finished 20 points behind Honda.

Honda’s campaign said the new report shows Khanna’s campaign lacks enough money to meet its payroll and rent.

“With less than 20 days to go until Election Day, Ro Khanna is 15 points down and in the position of deciding whether to spend his little remaining cash on his large staff or on continued attacks on Congressman Honda,” Honda campaign manager Doug Greven said in a news release Thursday. “Our campaign has nearly $1 million in cash, $900,000 more than Khanna, and we are just now starting to spend the majority of our resources when voters are paying the most attention to the election.”

Honda’s internal poll showed him 15 points ahead; Khanna’s poll showed a dead heat, and spokesman Tyler Law said that’s helping raise new money.

“The fact that the race is now a dead heat is also helping our final push to Election Day, both in terms of grassroots enthusiasm and financing,” Law said Thursday morning. “In fact, in the three days since we released our poll, we’ve raised nearly $55,000. We expect that kind of support will continue in the final weeks of this race.

Law noted 70 percent of Khanna’s third-quarter contributions came from Northern California, while only 41 percent of Honda’s did.

“With recent polls confirming this race is wide-open and the momentum is on our side, it’s clear that our early investments in an aggressive mail program and focus on building a state-of-the-art grassroots organization are paying dividends,” Law added. “As we’ve said all along, our team will have the resources needed to win in November. Just as importantly, we did it without taking a single dollar from PACs or lobbyists and have raised the vast majority from right here in the Bay Area — a stark contrast from our special-interest and Washington-funded opponent.”

But Khanna is getting external help. Californians for Innovation – a Super PAC formed in August by Khanna supporter Ash Chopra of Menlo Park, a financial advisor with Merrill Lynch – has reported spending $211,036.36 on the race this month forvoter data, mailers and postage.

Honda launched his first TV ad of the year on Sept. 29, and has had some help from the California Democratic Party to keep it on the air. Khanna, who aired a few ads before the primary, seems to be concentrating more on direct mail for his general-election advertising push.

UPDATE @ 4:58 P.M.: Click here to read the more complete story, including who’s bankrolling the pro-Khanna Super PAC.

Posted on Thursday, October 16th, 2014
Under: 2014 general, Mike Honda, U.S. House | 2 Comments »