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Obama to meet with tech executives Tuesday

President Obama will meet Tuesday with executives from leading tech companies – including some notable Bay Area names – to discuss progress made in addressing the glitches and breakdowns that plagued the HealthCare.gov website, a White House official said Monday.

In addition to talking about the botched rollout of the website – the portal connecting people seeking individual insurance policies under the nation’s new health care law – Obama and the tech executives will discuss how government can better deliver information technology “to maximize innovation, efficiency and customer service,” the official said.

Also on the agenda: “national security and the economic impacts of unauthorized intelligence disclosures,” and ways that the Obama administration can partner with the tech sector “to grow the economy, create jobs and address issues around income inequality and social mobility.”

Here’s the list of tech executives expected at the meeting:

  • Tim Cook, CEO, Apple
  • Dick Costolo, CEO, Twitter
  • Chad Dickerson, CEO, Etsy
  • Reed Hastings, Co-Founder & CEO, Netflix
  • Drew Houston, Founder & CEO, Dropbox
  • Marissa Mayer, President and CEO, Yahoo!
  • Burke Norton, Chief Legal Officer, Salesforce
  • Mark Pincus, Founder, Chief Product Officer & Chairman, Zynga
  • Shervin Pishevar, Co-Founder & Co-CEO, Sherpa Global
  • Brian Roberts, Chairman & CEO, Comcast
  • Erika Rottenberg, Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, LinkedIn
  • Sheryl Sandberg, COO, Facebook
  • Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Google
  • Brad Smith, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Microsoft
  • Randall Stephenson, Chairman & CEO, AT&T
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    Local DREAMers to take part in Fwd.us hackathon

    Several Bay Area DREAMers are among the 20 who’ve been invited to join a hackathon later this month organized by Fwd.us, the lobbying group launched earlier this year by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other Silicon Valley giants.

    They’ll work next to some of the region’s top engineers and designers during the event Nov. 20-21 at LinkedIn’s Mountain View headquarters, says Fwd.us founder and president Joe Green.

    “It’s well past time that we fix our broken immigration system – which isn’t working for American families in a modern global economy,” Green wrote in a statement posted on the group’s website. “Millions of DREAMers and their families with stories just like those participating in the Hackathon wait in limbo, unable to contribute fully to their communities and having to live in constant uncertainty – and we can’t wait any longer.”

    The DREAMers will form teams with experienced mentors and collaborate on prototypes of products to aid the immigration reform movement, Green wrote, with teams starting to strategize in the next few weeks before the hackathon: 24 straight hours of coding. “Some of the top product innovators of our time will be on hand to provide guidance on projects, including Mark Zuckerberg, Drew Houston, Reid Hoffman, and Andrew Mason.”

    “Our DREAMers are each an embodiment of the pressing need for meaningful immigration reform,” Green wrote. “They come from all over the country and a variety of backgrounds, but are united by the unique challenges facing undocumented families across America. Too many of our participants have gone years without seeing a family member or have been turned down for scholarships to college based solely on their undocumented status, but their courage has spurred them to continue pursuing their dreams.”

    Follow after the jump for bios (verbatim from Fwd.us) of the Bay Area DREAMers invited to the hackathon…
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    GOP holds its own Silicon Valley town hall

    Hours after President Obama held a town hall meeting on job creation Monday morning at the Mountain View headquarters of social networking site LinkedIn, three top House Republicans held a similar forum at the Palo Alto headquarters of Facebook.

    The discussion and question-and-answer session with House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va.; and Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield; and House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, D-Wisc., was moderated by Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg, who held a $35,800-a-plate fundraising dinner for President Obama on Sunday night at her Atherton home.

    Generally, they spoke about the need to reform the tax code to eliminate corporate loopholes so that everyone pays, and so everyone pays less; reforming entitlement programs such as Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid so that we can afford them; and bringing the kind of innovative interaction to Washington that has made Facebook such a success.

    Cantor said Republicans in coming weeks will be looking at rolling back regulations that they believe tie the hands of small businesses. Among those are environmental protection rules, which must be balanced with business’ needs, he said; they’ll also try to roll back some of the recent financial reforms that have made it too hard for small businesses to get credit and capital.

    McCarthy said the key to entitlement reform could be a bipartisan agreement that neither side will demonize the other, but instead, everyone will put all options on the table and let the public decide. He exhorted citizens to “join in, engage, do not sit back.”

    Ryan said he didn’t want to serve on the new Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction – often called the “super committee” – because he believes there’s so much more to do beyond that panel’s appointed task. Achieving $1.2 trillion in deficit reduction would be “a nice step in the right direction,” he said, but he’s contemplating a proposal to enact a whole new budgeting process to control future spending.

    In a “lightning round” of mini-questions from Sandberg, Ryan opted for entitlement reform even over tax reform. “Our government, both political parties, has been making promises to people we can’t keep,” he said, so current recipients should be protected but future benefits should be reigned in with higher retirement ages and wage-indexed benefits for Social Security and private insurance options under Medicare.

    The nation is at “a very precarious time right now” and must have a safety net for the needy, he said, but not “a hammock that lulls able bodied people into lives of complacency.”

    Ryan will speak and answer questions on health care reform tomorrow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

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    No press at President’s Bay Area fundraisers

    Apparently there will be no press access to President Obama’s fundraisers Sunday in Woodside and Atherton.

    This is different from his last Bay Area fundraising trip: In April, the White House travelling press corps and a designated local pool reporter – responsible for filing a report to the White House which is then disseminated to any interested media outlets – were allowed in. I was the pool reporter for the exclusive dinner at salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff’s San Francisco home, as well as for the big Masonic Auditorium rally that followed; the Chronicle’s Carla Marinucci was the pool reporter for a breakfast at San Francisco’s St. Regis Hotel the next day.

    At the Benioff dinner, the press was ushered in essentially through a back door and kept in a holding area. We were walked into the courtyard where the dinner was being held just in time to hear the President begin his remarks; we were walked out just as he started taking questions from the guests. At no time did we have an opportunity to ask questions of the guests, and certainly not of the President.

    But at least we heard what he said. The President will hold one open-press event during this trip: a town-hall style meeting on job creation Monday at the Mountain View headquarters of networking site LinkedIn.

    I can think of a few possible reasons why Sunday’s fundraisers won’t be open to the press like April’s were.

    For one, when the President was here in April, he hadn’t just announced plans to raise taxes on the wealthiest Americans to help solve the nation’s fiscal woes. Perhaps he doesn’t feel this is the right time to be seen accepting massive donations – the dinner costs $35,800 per plate, with $5,000 to his campaign and the rest to the Democratic National Committee – from those very same wealthy Americans.

    For another, Sunday’s fundraisers are happening right across the Bay from ground zero of a situation that’s still rippling through his Administration: the bankruptcy of Fremont-based solar manufacturer Solyndra after receiving a $535 million loan guarantee under the Recovery Act. It’s not an issue White House officials – or Solyndra executives, for that matter – have been eager to discuss, but it’ll certainly be on the minds of the Bay Area hoi polloi at these fundraisers.

    I asked Marjan Philhour, a San Francisco-based fundraising consultant who is executive director of the Bay Area Democrats PAC, about my ideas. “I don’t believe the decision you’ve described on press carries any particular significance,” she replied.

    Naturally, I always come at situations like this from the standpoint that the press should have access to everything the President does on a trip like this. Not everyone sees it that way.

    “I have never understood the practice of letting press into fundraising events,” said Michael Fraioli, a Washington, D.C.-based fundraiser with experience in California campaigns. “There is never a ‘good’ story about political fundraising. Some are less objectionable than others but that’s as good as it gets.”

    “Donors attend events to mix with each other and with the guest(s) of honor – not with reporters. President Obama has held firm to his position on PAC money and lobbyist money. I can’t say I agree but he has held firm and it does eliminate a fairly large pool of potential donors,” he continued. “Unlike the ‘good’ government groups which are in the habit of accusing politicians of granting special access to contributors, you will be able to see every contribution to these events on line and with details about the donors (employer and occupation). The watchdog groups give us only the information they choose to give when they choose to give it.”

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    President Obama to do town hall in Mountain View

    President Obama will take part in a town-hall meeting on job creation Monday at the Mountain View headquarters of professional networking site LinkedIn, the White House announced today.

    The President will answer questions about job creation and the economy from a live audience made up of LinkedIn members and employees, as well as questions that have been submitted from LinkedIn members across the country.

    In conjunction with this event, LinkedIn has launched an online community focused on job creation and the economy; people are invited to join the conversation with President Obama by submitting questions for the town hall, contributing comments, and sharing content with their own network.

    This group also will serve as a platform for LinkedIn users to continue the discussion on putting America back to work and let members engage with the White House and Administration officials even after the town hall. LinkedIn has more than 120 million members worldwide.

    The town hall will occur the day after the President’s previously scheduled, big-ticket Silicon Valley fundraisers.

    The President is scheduled to attend a fundraising reception at 4 p.m. Sunday at the Woodside home of John Thompson, chairman of Symantec and among those the President reportedly had considered for the job of Secretary of Commerce; the cost is $2,500 per ticket, or $7,500 to have a photo taken with the president. Then President Obama will attend a 6:30 p.m. dinner fundraiser at the Atherton home of Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg; that’s event costs $35,800 per plate, and it reportedly will include a question-and-answer period after the president’s remarks.