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Trump’s first TV ad, from Morocco to Mexico

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has released his first television campaign ad.

Trump has pledged to spend at least $2 million every week as the GOP nominating contest heats up, CNN reports, and the Iowa and New Hampshire television ad buys will cost him slightly in excess of that, according to his campaign.

PolitiFact notes while the narrator describes Trump’s vow to “stop illegal immigration by building a wall on our southern border that Mexico will pay for,” the footage displayed actually depicts migrants in Morocco trying to enter a Spanish enclave (and thus, the European Union).

But Politico’s Eliza Collins tweeted a statement from the Trump campaign saying that this was intentional “and selected to demonstrate the severe impact of an open border and the very real threat Americans face if we do not immediately build a wall and stop illegal immigration. The biased mainstream media doesn’t understand, but Americans who want to protect their jobs and their families do.”

This, of course, doubles down on Trump’s longstanding contentions that some crisis exists in southern border immigration, when in fact more people have been leaving the United States over that border than entering in recent years; and that immigrants pose a special criminal threat to Americans, which statistically speaking, they don’t.

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SD7: Enter the Koch Brothers

The latest salvo in 7th State Senate District special election’s independent-spending war – which now totals at least about $6.23 million – comes from an out-of-state group with ties to the Koch brothers, America’s favorite/most-despised conservative money men.

The only good thing left to say about this East Bay Democrat-on-Democrat showdown between Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, D-Concord, and Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer might be that it’ll be over on May 19, two weeks from today.

Independent Women’s Voice, a Washington, D.C.-based conservative nonprofit, started airing a television ad Monday night on cable channels in the district, (see update below) attacking Bonilla for accepting gifts and travel from special interests:

As noted by the Center for Media and Democracy’s SourceWatch, Independent Women’s Voice has received funding from the Koch-bankrolled Center to Protect Patient Rights, and has several staffers who’ve worked for other Koch-affiliated groups.

“So why are the Koch Brothers trying to come to Steve Glazer’s rescue?” asked Steve Maviglio, who runs a union-funded independent expenditure group that’s backing Bonilla. “That’s a good question. Maybe Steve Glazer can answer it – or denounce the special interests that are working overtime to get him elected for airing it.”

Glazer “dislikes the independent expenditure activity by all sides,” spokesman Jason Bezis replied Tuesday. “He said at the recent League of Women Voters debate that voters should immediately throw away and recycle all of the flyers in the mail. Similarly, he feels that voters should ignore all of the misleading media advertising.”

Bezis said Glazer would rather that voters consult “trusted sources of analysis such as newspaper editorials and local leaders who have knowledge of these candidates.” Judge their respective endorsements for yourself: Bonilla here, and Glazer here.

By my count, about $3.2 million has been independently spend on Glazer’s behalf, mostly by Bill Bloomfield – a Republican-turned-independent businessman from southern California – and by JobsPAC, the California Chamber of Commerce’s political action committee.

And about $3.03 million has been spent independently on Bonilla’s behalf, mostly by Maviglio’s labor-funded group, Working Families Opposing Glazer; Putting the East Bay First, another union-funded group; and the California Dental Association.

Please note that these figures are changing by the hour, as more TV ads are aired and district voters’ mailboxes are increasingly choked with several mailers per day. Everyone on both sides is convinced they’re doing the right thing; I’m coming to believe that practically none of them are.

Glazer later Tuesday agreed the “campaign spending and special interest involvement in this race is over the top.” He said this underscores the importance of requiring more integrity and transparency of campaigns and elected officials, per a “clean government code of conduct” he rolled out several weeks ago.

Glazer’s plan would require lawmakers to refuse all gifts, food and drink from those trying to influence the legislative process, and would ban campaign contributions during the “crunch times” when most laws are being passed. It also would require candidates to make public any questionnaires they complete while seeking endorsements, ban any per-diem payments to lawmakers for weekends and holidays when the Legislature isn’t in session, and ban use of campaign funds to pay family members for services.

Not a blessed one of which would change anything about how this ugly this contest has become.

UPDATE SATURDAY 5/9 8:50 A.M.: It now appears this Koch-related ad has NOT aired on television as pro-Bonilla people said, only online – yet it has inspired a $150,000 contribution from Tom Steyer to the labor group supporting Bonilla. More details here.

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SD7: See Susan Bonilla’s first television ad

Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla is launching her first television ad in the 7th State Senate District special election.

The clip includes former Rep. George Miller, D-Martinez, saying “Susan Bonilla is an effective legislator bringing people together to get things done.” Contra Costa County District Attoreny Mark Peterson and others then praise her record of balanced budgets, “fixing schools, creating jobs, fighting crime, passing historic pension reform, protecting the Delta and opposing the tunnels.” Miller then returns to say Bonilla “is true to her word and her actions,” hence her support by Democrats, Republicans, businesses, law enforcement and so on.

Bonilla campaign spokesman Patrick McGarrity said the ad started airing today and will keep running through the May 19 election on cable channels in Alameda and Contra Costa counties. The campaign’s TV budget “is in the low six figures,” he said.

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SD7: Union IE group launches pro-Bonilla TV ad

The union-funded PAC that’s opposing Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer in the 7th State Senate District’s special election has launched a television ad on behalf of Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, D-Concord.

Working Families Opposing Glazer for Senate 2015 rolled out a 30-second ad Wednesday highlighting Bonilla’s efforts to expand early childhood education and her support of a bipartisan bill making it easier to fire educators who abuse children. The ad ends with the voiceover: “No wonder classroom teachers, local law enforcement, and Governor Jerry Brown trust Susan Bonilla.”

https://youtu.be/ImIQlwAHcMc

Working Families spokesman Steve Maviglio said the ad began airing Wednesday and will run for at least a week on all three cable systems serving the district; he wouldn’t specify the cost, except to say it’s a “substantial” ad buy.

Records from the Secretary of State’s office show the group has spent at least $821,000 on the race so far. But Glazer has received a lot of independent-expenditure help, too – Southern California businessman Bill Bloomfield has anted up at least $763,000 on Glazer’s behalf, and the California Chamber of Commerce’s JobsPAC has spent at least about $494,000.

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New Padilla TV ad, Peterson radio ad in SoS race

Alex Padilla, the Democratic candidate for secretary of state, launched a 30-second television ad Thursday highlighting his personal background and legislative track record.

Padilla, a state senator from Pacoima, doesn’t mention his Republican rival, Pete Peterson, at all in the ad.

The ad is running on cable channels in the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles media markets, said Rose Kapolczynski, Padilla’s campaign consultant. “We’ll be adding in broadcast a little bit later, and we’ll be on now through the election.”

She wouldn’t say how much the campaign is spending to air the ad, but said it’s not as much as usual.

“If we had all of the statewide races heavily on the air, we’d be paying a premium for every spot,” she said. “But most of the statewide candidates are not heavily advertising, so for a down-ballot race like ours, we’re getting more bang for the buck.”

Peterson hasn’t aired television ads, but has a new one-minute radio ad that urges voters to look beyond party labels, underscores that Peterson sees the job as nonpartisan, and touting his newspaper endorsements.

Campaign finance reports show Padilla had about $410,000 cash on hand but about $4,600 in debt as of Sept. 30, but it seems he has collected at least $342,000 in new contributions since then. Peterson basically was in the red as of Sept. 30 – $52,500 cash on hand but $81,100 in debt – and has raised only about $46,000 in major contributions since.

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CA17: Honda launches attack ad against Khanna

Rep. Mike Honda rolled out a new television ad Monday attacking Democratic challenger Ro Khanna for having right-wing billionaires support his campaign, for favoring tax breaks for the rich and companies that offshore jobs, and for not being committed to protecting Social Security.

But Khanna’s campaign says Honda, D-San Jose, is making up many of the ad’s charges.

Honda’s campaign says this six-figure ad buy comes after Khanna’s campaign has been on the attack for weeks, including a recent mailer attacking Honda by calling him a “liberal Democrat.”

“After losing the primary by 20 points, Khanna’s entire campaign has been about attacking Congressman Honda, and today we’re hitting back,” Honda campaign manager Doug Greven said in a news release. “Voters need to know that Khanna is more concerned with representing his wealthy right-wing donors than the people who are working hard in this district to get by.”

Khanna spokesman Tyler Law said the ad is flat-out wrong.

“It’s a shame that after 14 lackluster years in office, Congressman Honda is resorting to false attacks and a ‘guilt-by-association’ strategy that ignores the facts,” Law said. “More than ever, this race is a clear choice between an old school politician with one of the poorest records in Congress and a new leader with a clear vision for creating good-paying jobs, fostering innovation, and preparing our children for success in life.”

Khanna sent an email to his supporters Monday morning calling the ad “full of lies” and saying that while his campaign does “not have the money for television, we will respond in the press, in mailers and on the ground.” Reports filed last week with the Federal Election Commission showed Honda still had close to $1 million banked for his campaign as of Sept. 30 while Khanna’s campaign was running dangerously low – a tremendous reversal of fortune, given that Khanna had vastly more money for the campaign’s first year but spent most of it before June’s primary.

“My hope is that voters in Silicon Valley will see through this kind of politics,” Khanna wrote. “My hope is they will choose intellectually honest positions over distortion.”

Let’s examine the ad point by point, after the jump…
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